Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov

Birth
Kiev, City of Kiev, Ukraine
Death 10 Mar 1940 (aged 48)
Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Burial Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Memorial ID 1504 · View Source
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Author. He is remembered as a 20th century Russian author, who was known for his plays, novels, short-stories but best known for his sense of humor and penetrating satire. Originally a successful physician, his birthplace is now a museum dedicated to his memory, and the house was described in his first novel in 1925, “The White Guard.” When the novel was adapted as a play, the name was changed to “The Days of Turbins,” and was staged with great success in 1926 but eventually banned for political reasons. In 1925 he wrote two other books, which were also eventually banned: a collection of five stories,“Deviltries,” and the satirical, “Heart of a Dog.” During World War I, he served in the Russian army as a physician and was wounded twice. After using Morphine for years for his chronic pain from these wounds, he broke the habit in 1918, and in 1926, he published the book “Morphine,” detailing this low point in his life. While a physician, he was concern about the serious spread of Syphilis in the region and researched the disease. A pathological worm-eaten like appearance on the tibia bone is a symptom of the disease of Syphilis, and this symptom was given the name of the "Bulgakov's Sign.” This followed with an eight-page story, “Feast with Syphilis,” which was written in March of 1925 and published in the newspaper “Gudok.” By 1930 he was, in effect, prohibited from publishing any more of his writings, and any plea from him to Joseph Stalin was rejected. In 1932, as the literary consultant to the Moscow Art Theater staff, he wrote the tragedy on the death of French playwright Moliere, called “Moliere”. A revised version was finally staged in 1935 for seven nights before it was banned for being an “attack on Stalin and the Communist Party.” Bulgakov's most well-known novel “The Master and Margarita” is considered as one of the greatest works of the 20th Century comparing Soviet Russia of the 1930s with Judea at the time of Jesus. Since he was banned from publishing, it could not be published until the 1960s, long after his death. His diaries were recovered from the KGB archives after the fall of communism and published under the title “Manuscripts Don't Burn,” which was from a famous phrase in “Master and Margarita.” A minor planet was named “4369 Bulgakov” by Soviet astronomer Lyudmila Georgievna in 1982. Bulgakov published a total of eleven books and five plays, with many still in print and translated to English.

Bio by: Linda Davis



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 31 Dec 2000
  • Find a Grave Memorial 1504
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Mikhail Bulgakov (15 May 1891–10 Mar 1940), Find a Grave Memorial no. 1504, citing Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia ; Maintained by Find A Grave .