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Rev Joseph Proud

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Rev Joseph Proud

Birth
Beaconsfield, South Bucks District, Buckinghamshire, England
Death
3 Aug 1826 (aged 81)
England
Burial
Hockley, Metropolitan Borough of Birmingham, West Midlands, England Add to Map
Memorial ID
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His father, John Proud (d. 1784), was a general baptist minister at Beaconsfield, and (from 1756) at Wisbech, Cambridgeshire.

On 24 Feb. 1789 he baptised, by immersion, nine persons as members of the ‘new church;’ he co-operated with its London leaders, and wrote, in three months, no less than three hundred original hymns for use in its worship.

A 'temple' was built for him in Cross Street, Hatton Garden ; he ordained his successor at Birmingham on 7 May 1797, and opened Hatton Garden 'temple' on 30 July.

Proud was now at the height of his popularity. His oratory drew overflowing congregations; his voice had much charm, in spite of a provincial accent, and his manner was singularly impressive.

He is described as wearing 'a purple silk vest, a golden girdle, and a white linen gown' (White).

In 1815-16 he undertook missionary journeys, in pursuance of the plan of a missionary ministry adopted by the 'general conference' of the 'new church.'

He is said during the course of his life to have preached seven thousand times and written three thousand sermons.

His personal character was high; he seems to have lacked geniality in private life, his manner was reserved, but he showed much fortitude under many domestic trials.

He died in a cottage of his own building at Handsworth, near Birmingham, on 3 Aug. 1826, and was buried in St. George's churchyard, Birmingham.

His funeral sermon was preached (20 Aug.) by Edward Madeley.

He was first married on 3 Feb. 1769, and by his first wife, who died in 1785, he had eleven children, two of whom survived him. On her death he married a widow, Susannah, who died on 21 Nov. 1826, aged 76.
His father, John Proud (d. 1784), was a general baptist minister at Beaconsfield, and (from 1756) at Wisbech, Cambridgeshire.

On 24 Feb. 1789 he baptised, by immersion, nine persons as members of the ‘new church;’ he co-operated with its London leaders, and wrote, in three months, no less than three hundred original hymns for use in its worship.

A 'temple' was built for him in Cross Street, Hatton Garden ; he ordained his successor at Birmingham on 7 May 1797, and opened Hatton Garden 'temple' on 30 July.

Proud was now at the height of his popularity. His oratory drew overflowing congregations; his voice had much charm, in spite of a provincial accent, and his manner was singularly impressive.

He is described as wearing 'a purple silk vest, a golden girdle, and a white linen gown' (White).

In 1815-16 he undertook missionary journeys, in pursuance of the plan of a missionary ministry adopted by the 'general conference' of the 'new church.'

He is said during the course of his life to have preached seven thousand times and written three thousand sermons.

His personal character was high; he seems to have lacked geniality in private life, his manner was reserved, but he showed much fortitude under many domestic trials.

He died in a cottage of his own building at Handsworth, near Birmingham, on 3 Aug. 1826, and was buried in St. George's churchyard, Birmingham.

His funeral sermon was preached (20 Aug.) by Edward Madeley.

He was first married on 3 Feb. 1769, and by his first wife, who died in 1785, he had eleven children, two of whom survived him. On her death he married a widow, Susannah, who died on 21 Nov. 1826, aged 76.

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  • Created by: Athanatos
  • Added: Jul 25, 2015
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/149790460/joseph-proud: accessed ), memorial page for Rev Joseph Proud (22 Mar 1745–3 Aug 1826), Find a Grave Memorial ID 149790460, citing St. George's Churchyard, Hockley, Metropolitan Borough of Birmingham, West Midlands, England; Maintained by Athanatos (contributor 46907585).