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 John Milton “Jack” Moss

John Milton “Jack” Moss

Birth
Cedar Gap, Wright County, Missouri, USA
Death 26 Feb 1918 (aged 23)
Lockerby, San Juan County, Utah, USA
Burial Eastland, San Juan County, Utah, USA
Memorial ID 148505 · View Source
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This marker sits not too far from the gate, underneath a cedar tree (probably the one directly behind the sign shown in the picture above). Jack Moss’s grave was the first in this cemetery.
My grandparents, Earl & Eliza Halls, homesteaded in Lockerby, Utah (my father was born there – Lockerby no longer exists, but was near where Eastland is now), from about 1915 to 1922. In his personal history, grandfather mentioned Jack Moss:
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A number of homesteaders wanted a shorter way to Dove Creek. So we went down to the coal bed and laid out a road to make across it. There was quite a deep canyon there and it was narrow. The whole thing was laid up with sandstone which required a considerable amount of blasting. The boys had me take my forge down to sharpen steel for them. I put the forge under a big rock ledge as they had part of the road built, and sharpened steel while the rest of them did most of the drilling and blasting.
One day when they were ready to fire six shots on the far side of the canyon, Harold Hodge and Jack Moss came across to move the horses back just before they lit the fuses. They passed my forge and said they were going to move the horses back. Well, they did. They put their horses back into the trees and why, I don’t know, but they came back to the edge of the canyon and stood there.
Well after the first two or three blasts I heard Harold shout for help. I ducked out far enough to ask if any more shots were going, and they told me there wasn’t. I didn’t want to get out there when they were shooting more rock. I ran up on the hill, but of course Harold had gone back, fearing that more blasts were going. And there lay Jack on his back. I picked him up. His head flopped over in front of me. I held him up in a sitting position. Jack died in my arms and it was a pretty hard blow for all of us.
We loaded him onto a wagon and took him up to Nielsens. Mrs. Nielson wrapped his head up before we took him home to his father and mother. Three of us went to Monticello and filed on ten acres of ground for a cemetery, and Jack was the first one to be buried there. Then we fenced it and put two large cedar posts up for a gateway. I furnished the sixteen-inch board to go across the top, and a homesteader who was a good sign painter made a sign, “Mountain View Cemetery.”
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It was often said that we had to kill a man to start a graveyard.
A few years ago when I was down in Monticello, we drove out to the cemetery. The old board was laying down by the side of the fence and they had put up a different gate. The sign had been changed. And there were at least one hundred graves in the cemetery at that time.



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  • Imported from: UT State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 148505
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for John Milton “Jack” Moss (1 Jun 1894–26 Feb 1918), Find A Grave Memorial no. 148505, citing Mountain View Cemetery, Eastland, San Juan County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Utah State Historical Society (contributor 4) .