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 Clyde <I>Dixon</I> Connell

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Clyde Dixon Connell Famous memorial

Birth
Belcher, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, USA
Death
1 May 1998 (aged 96)
Elm Grove, Bossier Parish, Louisiana, USA
Burial
Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, USA
Plot
Section B, Lot 77
Memorial ID
14720368 View Source

Sculptress, primitive artist and civil rights advocate. Featured in People magazine and on PBS and was the subject of at least two books. Her works were featured in the show "Different Drummers" at the Hirschhorn Museum of Art at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., and in the "The Dream of Egypt" at the Centro Cutural/Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City. The state of Louisiana declared her a "state treasure" in 1998. She blended wood carving and mixed media, and over the course of years developed a style of crafting almost architectural forms that echoed primitive totems. She fashioned art from wood on the Caddo Parish Penal Farm that her husband, T.D. Connell, administered, and created woodcut portraits of the prisoners, often giving these to her subjects. By the 1970s, her primitive but gentle sculptures and wall hangings were sought by collectors and praised by critics across the country and abroad. Her moss-shaded house on the shores of Lake Bistineau was a magnet for art students and professional artists alike. Pieces in major galleries and museums across the world are mainly from her "Totems" and "Habitats" series, but she also created "Swamp Songs," two-dimensional works with rune-like inscriptions. Daughter of a plantation owner from Belcher in rural Caddo Parish, named after the River Clyde in Scotland.

Sculptress, primitive artist and civil rights advocate. Featured in People magazine and on PBS and was the subject of at least two books. Her works were featured in the show "Different Drummers" at the Hirschhorn Museum of Art at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., and in the "The Dream of Egypt" at the Centro Cutural/Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City. The state of Louisiana declared her a "state treasure" in 1998. She blended wood carving and mixed media, and over the course of years developed a style of crafting almost architectural forms that echoed primitive totems. She fashioned art from wood on the Caddo Parish Penal Farm that her husband, T.D. Connell, administered, and created woodcut portraits of the prisoners, often giving these to her subjects. By the 1970s, her primitive but gentle sculptures and wall hangings were sought by collectors and praised by critics across the country and abroad. Her moss-shaded house on the shores of Lake Bistineau was a magnet for art students and professional artists alike. Pieces in major galleries and museums across the world are mainly from her "Totems" and "Habitats" series, but she also created "Swamp Songs," two-dimensional works with rune-like inscriptions. Daughter of a plantation owner from Belcher in rural Caddo Parish, named after the River Clyde in Scotland.

Bio by: John Andrew Prime


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: John Andrew Prime
  • Added: 24 Jun 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 14720368
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14720368/clyde-connell: accessed ), memorial page for Clyde Dixon Connell (19 Sep 1901–1 May 1998), Find a Grave Memorial ID 14720368, citing Forest Park Cemetery, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave .