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 Arbury Eleven Eastman

Arbury Eleven Eastman

Birth
Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, USA
Death Oct 1908 (aged 63)
Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, USA
Burial Woodruff, Rich County, Utah, USA
Memorial ID 146360 · View Source
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The following except was taken from the book "The First 100 Years in Woodruff" and said it was taken from the journal of Arbury Eastman:

Arbury Eleven Seller Eastman was the son of Harm Eastman and Mary Philbrick. He was born June 17, 1845, in Rumford, Oxford County, Maine. Arbury's father was a farmer, so Arbury was raised on a farm and attended the district school until he was sixteen years old. He enlisted in the Army, running away with some other boys from school. He was in nine regular battles during his war experience. He arrived home in June 1865, and invested his money in a farm, buying a few head of stock and two fine horses and a new buggy. He planted three acres of hops and in three years he had cleared about $1,000.00
July 1, 1866, he was married to Emma Athalinda Twombly and they lived a happy life. Eleven sons and daughter were born to them and all of them died young except three--William Byron, born in Bountiful, Elmer Daniel and Minnie Emma, born in Woodruff, Utah.
In 1868, A.W. Putnam had commenced preaching the principle of Mormonism in Arbury's neighborhood. Arbury read the Book of Mormon and the Bible through and became convinced that those principles were true so he and his wife were baptized by A.W. Putnam. In the fall of 1868, Elder Perry G. Sessions came there as missionary and induced them to sell all they had or give it away and come out to Utah. When the people knew they were going to Utah, they would not pay anything or a trifle for their substances. Out of about $2,000.00 worth of property, Arbury received about $500 and it was so with the rest. He left his interest in the farm to his father's folks and never got anything out of it.
They started from Maine on March 28, 1868, and arrived in Bountiful, Utah on April 9. They lived there with George Eastman family until 1870 when they moved to Woodruff, Utah. They spent the first winter with Indians as neighbors, they being the only white people within ten miles of Randolph, a new settlement, and Evanston, Wyoming, a railroad town that was quite a place. They caught trout from the creek that was full of beaver dams and killed plenty sage hens and rabbits and had plenty of fresh meat. In the spring of 1871, Arbury left to get work at a sawmill in Hard Scrabble Canyon at $50.00 per month and the next season he took charge of the whole outfit. He could only get half of his pay so in the winter of 1872, he went back to Woodruff and lived in a dugout where the church now stands. The next summer he got logs and built a house.
Byron Session moved out to Woodruff from Bountiful and he and Arbury formed a partnership and took some land over the river and started a ranch. They were together twelve years. In 1874 Arbury started a store and ran it for 12 years. While in the store business, he extended credit to everyone. He never refused anyone the necessities of life whether they were poor or were owning him much or little.
In 1878, he was elected Justice of the Peace. He was appointed Postmaster in the spring of 1844 and served six years. He taught school and took his pay mostly in cedar posts. He was very anxious to build up the town of Woodruff. In 1884, he took up a homestead and perfected it--in 1888 he sold al the land that was claimed in town to the people. Arbury prospected for three seasons and struck some good copper but did not have enough money to develop them. He also had the privilege of washing out gold.
In 1885, he took a trip back east to Main in company with W.K. Walton. They were set apart as Visiting Missionaries and were there about two and a half months.
He moved to Evanston in 1890 with his family. His business was buying butter, eggs and all kinds of vegetable and fruits. He ran a wagon over to Almy every day. In February of 1891, he moved back to Woodruff to his home. he put in a garden and raised vegetables, small fruits, etc.
On August 22, 1902 his wife passed away after being an invalid for four years. In july of 1907, Arbury moved back to Main and died there in October, 1908.


It appears that Arbury Eastman is buried in Roxybury, Oxford, Maine. However, his family also included his name on the headstone in the Woodruff, Utah cemetery. See memorial #38133785 also.


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  • Maintained by: A.Bell
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 146360
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Arbury Eleven Eastman (17 Jun 1845–Oct 1908), Find A Grave Memorial no. 146360, citing Woodruff Cemetery, Woodruff, Rich County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by A.Bell (contributor 46518784) .