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James Shaw

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James Shaw Veteran

Birth
Clermontville, Clermont County, Ohio, USA
Death
14 Feb 1879 (aged 70)
Lexington, Lee County, Texas, USA
Burial
Lee County, Texas, USA GPS-Latitude: 30.4221823, Longitude: -96.9453553
Memorial ID
View Source
SHAW, JAMES (1808-1879) ~ James Shaw, veteran of the Battle of San Jacinto and Texas legislator, was born in Clermontville, Clermont County, Ohio, on August 8, 1808. He was a land surveyor and teacher. Shaw settled in what is now Milam County, Texas, in the early 1830s and served as a private in Capt. Henry Wax Karnes's company of Mirabeau B. Lamar's Cavalry corps at the battle of San jacinto; he also served as first lieutenant of a cavalry company commanded in turn by captains Thomas Robbins, William H. Smith, and John Dyers in 1836. In 1837, Shaw settled in the area then part of Burelson County (1874 Lee County): Lexington; named for the Massachusetts town where the American Revolution began. The area of Lexington was first inhabited by Tonkawa Indians in which Shaw encountered near the Indian Camp Branch, named by Shaw to honor the friendly Indians. Receiving a land grant from the Battle of San Jacinto, he built a log cabin in the area becoming the first white settler and soon other Anglo-Americans joined him, building up the town of Lexington.
Shaw also set up the first post office at nearby String Prarie in 1849, becoming postmaster. In the same year, Shaw also held the first local school session in his log cabin. The school soon grew and in 1854 a 2-story schoolhouse-lodge hall was built a mile south of Lexington. In 1860, the school became Lexington Male and Female Academy, using the same hall. A frame schoolhouse was built in 1892 and then one of brick in 1910.
Shaw became a representative and senator of five different congresses. He represented Milam County in the house of the Thrid and Fifth congresses and was senator form Milam and Robertson counties in the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth congresses. After annexation he represented the Milam district in the House of the Second, Fifth, and Sixth legislatures. He was a member of the Texas Veteran's Association.
He married Nancy A. Riggs who died in Lexington, leaving him with two sons and a daughter. On August 8, 1877 (Shaw's birthday) he married Mrs. Courtney Kray, with whom he had one son.
Shaw died in his home near Lexington in Lee County, on February 14, 1879, and was buried in the Early Chapel Cemetery. The cemetery began in 1850 when the Methodist Episcopal Church South bought the site. However, other burials occurred before 1850. As of 1967, the cemetery was noted as being in disrepair.
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Sources:
www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/SS/fsh9.html
http://www.thc.state.tx.us/
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Contributed by Stephanie Sorensen, Historian, Texas State Cemetery Research Staff, Austin, Texas. I welcome any corrections or addtions.
************************************************************
SHAW, JAMES (1808-1879) ~ James Shaw, veteran of the Battle of San Jacinto and Texas legislator, was born in Clermontville, Clermont County, Ohio, on August 8, 1808. He was a land surveyor and teacher. Shaw settled in what is now Milam County, Texas, in the early 1830s and served as a private in Capt. Henry Wax Karnes's company of Mirabeau B. Lamar's Cavalry corps at the battle of San jacinto; he also served as first lieutenant of a cavalry company commanded in turn by captains Thomas Robbins, William H. Smith, and John Dyers in 1836. In 1837, Shaw settled in the area then part of Burelson County (1874 Lee County): Lexington; named for the Massachusetts town where the American Revolution began. The area of Lexington was first inhabited by Tonkawa Indians in which Shaw encountered near the Indian Camp Branch, named by Shaw to honor the friendly Indians. Receiving a land grant from the Battle of San Jacinto, he built a log cabin in the area becoming the first white settler and soon other Anglo-Americans joined him, building up the town of Lexington.
Shaw also set up the first post office at nearby String Prarie in 1849, becoming postmaster. In the same year, Shaw also held the first local school session in his log cabin. The school soon grew and in 1854 a 2-story schoolhouse-lodge hall was built a mile south of Lexington. In 1860, the school became Lexington Male and Female Academy, using the same hall. A frame schoolhouse was built in 1892 and then one of brick in 1910.
Shaw became a representative and senator of five different congresses. He represented Milam County in the house of the Thrid and Fifth congresses and was senator form Milam and Robertson counties in the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth congresses. After annexation he represented the Milam district in the House of the Second, Fifth, and Sixth legislatures. He was a member of the Texas Veteran's Association.
He married Nancy A. Riggs who died in Lexington, leaving him with two sons and a daughter. On August 8, 1877 (Shaw's birthday) he married Mrs. Courtney Kray, with whom he had one son.
Shaw died in his home near Lexington in Lee County, on February 14, 1879, and was buried in the Early Chapel Cemetery. The cemetery began in 1850 when the Methodist Episcopal Church South bought the site. However, other burials occurred before 1850. As of 1967, the cemetery was noted as being in disrepair.
************************************************************
Sources:
www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/SS/fsh9.html
http://www.thc.state.tx.us/
************************************************************
Contributed by Stephanie Sorensen, Historian, Texas State Cemetery Research Staff, Austin, Texas. I welcome any corrections or addtions.
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