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William Henry Gentry

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William Henry Gentry Veteran

Birth
Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky, USA
Death
25 Apr 2000 (aged 81)
Blacksburg, Montgomery County, Virginia, USA
Burial
Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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1st Lt. William H. Gentery was a member of C Company, 192nd Tank Battalion. He was a Kentucky National Guardsman called to federal service when his tank company was federalized, in 1940, as D Company, 192nd Tank Battalion.
Gentry was stationed in the Philippine Islands when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Ten hours later, he lived through the bombing of Clark Airfield. For four months, he fought, with the other soldiers on Bataan, to slow Japan’s conquest of the Philippines. He was commanding officer of the first American tank battle victory in World War II.
Without food, without adequate supplies, and no hope of being relieved, he became a Prisoner of War on April 9, 1942, when Bataan was surrendered to the Japanese. As a POW, he was held at Camp O’Donnell and Cabanatuan in the Philippines. He remained in the camp until liberated on January 30, 1945, by U.S. Army Rangers in what is now called "The Great Raid."

1st Lt. William H. Gentery was a member of C Company, 192nd Tank Battalion. He was a Kentucky National Guardsman called to federal service when his tank company was federalized, in 1940, as D Company, 192nd Tank Battalion.
Gentry was stationed in the Philippine Islands when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Ten hours later, he lived through the bombing of Clark Airfield. For four months, he fought, with the other soldiers on Bataan, to slow Japan’s conquest of the Philippines. He was commanding officer of the first American tank battle victory in World War II.
Without food, without adequate supplies, and no hope of being relieved, he became a Prisoner of War on April 9, 1942, when Bataan was surrendered to the Japanese. As a POW, he was held at Camp O’Donnell and Cabanatuan in the Philippines. He remained in the camp until liberated on January 30, 1945, by U.S. Army Rangers in what is now called "The Great Raid."



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