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Saint John Bosco

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Saint John Bosco Famous memorial

Birth
Castelnuovo Don Bosco, Provincia di Asti, Piemonte, Italy
Death
31 Jan 1888 (aged 72)
Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
Burial
Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy
Memorial ID
14503750 View Source

Roman Catholic Saint. At the age of nine, in a dream he saw what his mission must be and he prepared himself, amidst hardships and obstacles, working and studying to be able to realize it. He studied in Chieri, a few kilometers from Turin and every day, morning and evening he went to the Church of Santa Maria della Scala (the cathedral). By praying and reflecting in front of the altar of the Chapel of the Madonna delle Grazie, he decided his future. At the age of 19, he made the decision to become a Franciscan priest. After much prayer, and after consulting with friends and with his confessor Don Giuseppe Cafasso, he entered the seminary to study theology. He was then ordained a priest in Turin in the church of the Immaculate Conception on June 5, 1841. He firmly made three resolutions; strictly occupying time, suffering, act, humiliating himself in everything and always when it comes to saving souls. Arriving in Turin, he was immediately struck to see hundreds of boys and young people in disarray, without guidance and work and wanted to consecrate his life for their salvation. On December 8, 1841, in the church of San Francesco d'Assisi, he met the first of the many young people who would have known and followed him, Bartolomeo Garelli. Thus began the work of the Oratory, itinerant at the beginning, then from Easter 1846, in its permanent home in Valdocco, the Mother House of all Salesian works. Hundreds of boys studied and learned the trade in the workshops that he built for them. In his educational work he was helped by his mother who supported him and acted as a mother to many of his children who had lost their parents. In 1859 the first collaborators arrived to join him in the Salesian Congregation, oratories, professional schools, colleges, vocation centers, parishes, missions etc. In 1872 he founded the Institute of the Figlie di Maria Ausiliatrice (FMA) who will work in various works for female youth. Co-founder and first superior was Maria Domenica Mazzarello (1837 to 1881) who was proclaimed a saint on June 21, 1951 by Pius XII. But he also knew how to call numerous lay people to share the same educational devotion as him with the Salesians and the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians. Since 1869 he had initiated the Pious Union of Cooperators who are fully part of the Salesian Family and live its spirit by doing their utmost in ecclesial service. Until the end of his life he dedicated every moment to young people. He was beatified on June 2, 1929 and declared a saint by Pius XI on April 1, 1934, Easter Sunday.

Roman Catholic Saint. At the age of nine, in a dream he saw what his mission must be and he prepared himself, amidst hardships and obstacles, working and studying to be able to realize it. He studied in Chieri, a few kilometers from Turin and every day, morning and evening he went to the Church of Santa Maria della Scala (the cathedral). By praying and reflecting in front of the altar of the Chapel of the Madonna delle Grazie, he decided his future. At the age of 19, he made the decision to become a Franciscan priest. After much prayer, and after consulting with friends and with his confessor Don Giuseppe Cafasso, he entered the seminary to study theology. He was then ordained a priest in Turin in the church of the Immaculate Conception on June 5, 1841. He firmly made three resolutions; strictly occupying time, suffering, act, humiliating himself in everything and always when it comes to saving souls. Arriving in Turin, he was immediately struck to see hundreds of boys and young people in disarray, without guidance and work and wanted to consecrate his life for their salvation. On December 8, 1841, in the church of San Francesco d'Assisi, he met the first of the many young people who would have known and followed him, Bartolomeo Garelli. Thus began the work of the Oratory, itinerant at the beginning, then from Easter 1846, in its permanent home in Valdocco, the Mother House of all Salesian works. Hundreds of boys studied and learned the trade in the workshops that he built for them. In his educational work he was helped by his mother who supported him and acted as a mother to many of his children who had lost their parents. In 1859 the first collaborators arrived to join him in the Salesian Congregation, oratories, professional schools, colleges, vocation centers, parishes, missions etc. In 1872 he founded the Institute of the Figlie di Maria Ausiliatrice (FMA) who will work in various works for female youth. Co-founder and first superior was Maria Domenica Mazzarello (1837 to 1881) who was proclaimed a saint on June 21, 1951 by Pius XII. But he also knew how to call numerous lay people to share the same educational devotion as him with the Salesians and the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians. Since 1869 he had initiated the Pious Union of Cooperators who are fully part of the Salesian Family and live its spirit by doing their utmost in ecclesial service. Until the end of his life he dedicated every moment to young people. He was beatified on June 2, 1929 and declared a saint by Pius XI on April 1, 1934, Easter Sunday.

Bio by: Ruggero


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Tom
  • Added: 4 Jun 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 14503750
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14503750/john-bosco: accessed ), memorial page for Saint John Bosco (16 Aug 1815–31 Jan 1888), Find a Grave Memorial ID 14503750, citing Basilica Santuario di Maria Ausiliatrice, Turin, Città Metropolitana di Torino, Piemonte, Italy; Maintained by Find a Grave .