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 Edward Vincent Dockweiler

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Edward Vincent Dockweiler

Birth
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Death
30 Mar 1961 (aged 59)
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Culver City, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Plot
Section P Lot 201
Memorial ID
145012722 View Source

Rear Admiral (USN, ret.) and chief harbor engineer of the Los Angeles Harbor. A member of the prominent Dockweiler family of Los Angeles, he attended Loyola High School before attending the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating 10th in his class in 1924. He later received a master of science degree in naval construction from MIT. Prior to his appointment by the Board of Harbor Commissioners,he had illustrious 25 year career in the Navy. His most memorable wartime experiences were the fall of the Philippines to the Japanese and subsequent 3 year, 8 month imprisonment. He was lieutenant commander in charge of ship repair and construction at Cavite Naval Base when the war broke out. He escaped from Corregidor and later Cebu and for almost 6 months was one of the officers against the invaders. He and 26 other U.S. officers surrendered on the island of Negros after learning that the Japanese would kill all prisoners unless the guerilla resistance ceased. He was decorated with the Bronze Star and the Distinguished Service Cross for his gallantry.

Rear Admiral (USN, ret.) and chief harbor engineer of the Los Angeles Harbor. A member of the prominent Dockweiler family of Los Angeles, he attended Loyola High School before attending the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating 10th in his class in 1924. He later received a master of science degree in naval construction from MIT. Prior to his appointment by the Board of Harbor Commissioners,he had illustrious 25 year career in the Navy. His most memorable wartime experiences were the fall of the Philippines to the Japanese and subsequent 3 year, 8 month imprisonment. He was lieutenant commander in charge of ship repair and construction at Cavite Naval Base when the war broke out. He escaped from Corregidor and later Cebu and for almost 6 months was one of the officers against the invaders. He and 26 other U.S. officers surrendered on the island of Negros after learning that the Japanese would kill all prisoners unless the guerilla resistance ceased. He was decorated with the Bronze Star and the Distinguished Service Cross for his gallantry.


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