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 Mary Gertrude Fendall

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Mary Gertrude Fendall

Birth
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Death Jan 1971 (aged 81)
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Burial Burial Details Unknown
Memorial ID 144857991 View Source

Mary was the daughter of Benjamin Truman Fendall V (1851-1923) and Florence Phillips Mason (1858-1941).

She never married

Mary graduated from Bryn Mawr College, located in Philadelphia in 1912, where she matriculated in math and physics. She traveled in France several times including a trip there in the early 20's when she was active in the suffrage movement. Mary was a woman's political activist. She was secretary to Mrs. August Belmont, a Woman Suffragist leader. Mary held what was then radical views, to the horror of her father. She campaigned for the National Woman's Party in the West in 1916.
While campaigning for national legislation to give the ballot to women outside of the White House in 1917, Mary had the distinction of being approached by Vice President Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964). He asked if she, along with some of her fellow picketers, would care to come in from the icy wind and have some hot tea or coffee, this being by request of President Woodrow Wilson (1836-1924). She indignantly refused.
She was Treasurer of the Executive Committee of the National Women's Party from June 1917, to December 1919. Mary was arrested and sentenced to 3 days, Jan. 1919, for applauding in court. She went to France to lobby the U.S. Armistice Commission. Mary was also Executive Secretary of the Joint Amnesty Committee in 1923, which was located at Lenox Building, 1523 L Street, Washington D.C. The Joint Amnesty Committee was affiliated with the American Civil Liberties Union, and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mary also served as Chairman of Literature for the Congressional Union. She was known in Washington as “the girl who had managed the picket line...” Mary came to Oregon politicking for Hon. Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948) a Republican running against Woodrow Wilson (1836-1924) and William Howard Taft (1857-1930) in the 1912 Presidential Election. She was transported by the "Golden Limited" train. Her address in Washington D.C. in 1922-23 was 1620 P NW. She also lived in Baltimore in 1940.


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