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Newton Washington Allphin

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Newton Washington Allphin

Birth
West, McLennan County, Texas, USA
Death
24 Dec 1972 (aged 97)
Tahoka, Lynn County, Texas, USA
Burial
Tahoka, Lynn County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Plot
Block 11
Memorial ID
View Source
Song writer and a member of the church of Christ.

Newton W. Allphin, song writer, music instructor and composer, born November 25, 1875 in the West community near Waco, Texas, passed away December 24, 1972 at the age of 97 years and one month. He is survived by his wife, Lorena of the home, a daughter, Mrs. John Cearley of Pecos, two grandchildren, Mrs. Coy Hudson of Pecos and John Allen Cearley of Alice, Texas, and four great-grandchildren. Brother Allphin was largely self-taught, having been orphaned at age eight. He evidenced unusual music talent at an early age as he attended singing schools which were well known at that time. He studied under many good teachers such as F.I. Eiland and Dr. J.B. Herbert. His career began in 1897 as a music instructor, song leader and preacher for the church of Christ. He was married to Miss Chessie Lorena Bradley on December 25, 1909 in Kaufman and she became his co-worker in teaching music and conducting singing schools. His best years in teaching music were from 1902 until 1932. He founded the New Song Music Co. in Fort Worth, was editor of the Musical Light Magazine for several years and co-founded the Analytic and New Light Normal School of Fort Worth. During his musical career he composed both words and music for about 125 religious songs and has written the lyrics for more than 1,000 songs. Many of his songs were published under the pen-names of Carl Cross, Lawrence Love and Paul Ponder. He compiled and published twelve song books, a book on music theory, and authored a commentary on the Book of Revelation. He also wrote for many church papers and publications. Writing and correcting musical scores for other composers continued during his declining years, correcting his last manuscript about three months ago. He was in demand as an able leader of congregational singing and directed singing in gospel meetings for 84 evangelists. He also preached for churches and in meetings at intervals from 1897 until 1949. His work was not confined to religious themes. He composed solo work for the piano and wind instruments, corrected music scores for many well-known writers, wrote marches for bands and other compositions for concert bands including the Texas Tech Band of Lubbock. His works have been played from Lubbock to Cincinnati. He has also written many columns for newspapers in both humorous and serious veins. Many of these were published under pen-names. He moved to Tahoka in 1929 from Abilene and has been a member of this church of Christ since that time. His last morning was spent listening to his favorite church service over the radio and his Bible remained open at the last passage he read. He never mentioned a favorite passage but read extensively the last years of his life until he was familiar with the whole book. He was able to quote from memory much of the Bible to the very last of his life. He cared little for the material things of this life except as stepping stones to the life beyond. -- Gordon Musick. Gospel Advocate, January 11, 1973, p. 31.

"A Texan who at one time was a well known songwriter among churches of Christ was Newton W. Allphin, who lived from 1875 to 1972. In addition to his religious music work, he produced piano solos in sheet music and band marches. Later in life, he was a tax accountant. Perhaps his best known song is 'You Will Reap What You Sow,' from 1938 with music by Virgil O. Stamps. But he also provided both words and music for a little prayer hymn which has appeared in some of our books."

Blessed Savior, now we pray, Be Thou near us, all the day;
While, before Thy throne we boy, Hear us, Lord, and bless us now.
Gracious Father, hear our prayer--May we, now, Thy blessings share;
Guide us safely all the way To that home of endless day.
May our faith and trust, dear Lord, Ever be in Thy blest word;
Keep us ever near Thy side. Let us in Thy love abide.
Chorus: Savior, Savior, keep us near Thy blessed side;
Savior, Savior, let us in Thy love abide.
Song writer and a member of the church of Christ.

Newton W. Allphin, song writer, music instructor and composer, born November 25, 1875 in the West community near Waco, Texas, passed away December 24, 1972 at the age of 97 years and one month. He is survived by his wife, Lorena of the home, a daughter, Mrs. John Cearley of Pecos, two grandchildren, Mrs. Coy Hudson of Pecos and John Allen Cearley of Alice, Texas, and four great-grandchildren. Brother Allphin was largely self-taught, having been orphaned at age eight. He evidenced unusual music talent at an early age as he attended singing schools which were well known at that time. He studied under many good teachers such as F.I. Eiland and Dr. J.B. Herbert. His career began in 1897 as a music instructor, song leader and preacher for the church of Christ. He was married to Miss Chessie Lorena Bradley on December 25, 1909 in Kaufman and she became his co-worker in teaching music and conducting singing schools. His best years in teaching music were from 1902 until 1932. He founded the New Song Music Co. in Fort Worth, was editor of the Musical Light Magazine for several years and co-founded the Analytic and New Light Normal School of Fort Worth. During his musical career he composed both words and music for about 125 religious songs and has written the lyrics for more than 1,000 songs. Many of his songs were published under the pen-names of Carl Cross, Lawrence Love and Paul Ponder. He compiled and published twelve song books, a book on music theory, and authored a commentary on the Book of Revelation. He also wrote for many church papers and publications. Writing and correcting musical scores for other composers continued during his declining years, correcting his last manuscript about three months ago. He was in demand as an able leader of congregational singing and directed singing in gospel meetings for 84 evangelists. He also preached for churches and in meetings at intervals from 1897 until 1949. His work was not confined to religious themes. He composed solo work for the piano and wind instruments, corrected music scores for many well-known writers, wrote marches for bands and other compositions for concert bands including the Texas Tech Band of Lubbock. His works have been played from Lubbock to Cincinnati. He has also written many columns for newspapers in both humorous and serious veins. Many of these were published under pen-names. He moved to Tahoka in 1929 from Abilene and has been a member of this church of Christ since that time. His last morning was spent listening to his favorite church service over the radio and his Bible remained open at the last passage he read. He never mentioned a favorite passage but read extensively the last years of his life until he was familiar with the whole book. He was able to quote from memory much of the Bible to the very last of his life. He cared little for the material things of this life except as stepping stones to the life beyond. -- Gordon Musick. Gospel Advocate, January 11, 1973, p. 31.

"A Texan who at one time was a well known songwriter among churches of Christ was Newton W. Allphin, who lived from 1875 to 1972. In addition to his religious music work, he produced piano solos in sheet music and band marches. Later in life, he was a tax accountant. Perhaps his best known song is 'You Will Reap What You Sow,' from 1938 with music by Virgil O. Stamps. But he also provided both words and music for a little prayer hymn which has appeared in some of our books."

Blessed Savior, now we pray, Be Thou near us, all the day;
While, before Thy throne we boy, Hear us, Lord, and bless us now.
Gracious Father, hear our prayer--May we, now, Thy blessings share;
Guide us safely all the way To that home of endless day.
May our faith and trust, dear Lord, Ever be in Thy blest word;
Keep us ever near Thy side. Let us in Thy love abide.
Chorus: Savior, Savior, keep us near Thy blessed side;
Savior, Savior, let us in Thy love abide.


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