Czeslawa Kwoka

Czeslawa Kwoka

Birth
Lubelskie, Poland
Death 12 Mar 1943 (aged 14)
Oświęcim, Powiat oświęcimski, Małopolskie, Poland
Burial Oświęcim, Powiat oświęcimski, Małopolskie, Poland
Memorial ID 144012368 View Source
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She was the daughter of Katarzyna Kwoka and she was born on 15 August 1928 in Wólka Z³ojecka, Poland. She was a Catholic Pole who entered Auschwitz on 13 Dec 1942. She was given prisoner number 26947.

After her arrival at Auschwitz, Czes³awa Kwoka was photographed for the Reich's concentration camp records, and she has been identified as one of the approximately 40,000 to 50,000 subjects of such "identity pictures" taken under duress at Auschwitz-Birkenau by Wilhelm Brasse, a young Polish inmate in his twenties (known as Auschwitz prisoner number 3444). Trained as a portrait photographer at his aunt's studio prior to the 1939 German invasion of Poland beginning World War II, Brasse and others had been ordered to photograph inmates by their Nazi captors, under dreadful camp conditions and likely imminent death if the photographers refused to comply.

These photographs that he and others were ordered to take capture each inmate "in three poses: from the front and from each side." Though ordered to destroy all photographs and their negatives, Brasse became famous after the war for having helped to rescue some of them from oblivion.

Such acts of courage as Brasse's and his colleagues enabled many like Kwoka not to become forgotten as mere bureaucratic statistics, but to be remembered as individual human beings.

She died on 12 March 1943 from unknown causes. She was only 14-years-old.Auschwitz Nazi Concentration Camp

Prisoner of German Nazis

Czesɫawa Kwoka (pronounced in Polish Ches- wah-vah Kvoh - kah) was a Polish child born in Wolka Zɫojecka, Poland who died in the Auschwitz Nazi Concentration Camp during World War II. She was prisoner number 26947 who was one of approximately 230,000 children and young people who were arbitrarily detained and deported to Auschwitz from 1940 to 1945. Czesɫawa was deported and transported from Zamosc, Poland on December 13, 1942. She was one of thousands who were photographed for the Reich's concentration camp records ("identity photographs"). Her photos were taken under duress by Wilhelm Brasse, a trained portrait photographer, himself a Polish inmate in his twenties. As the war was coming to an end, Brasse (prisoner number 3444) and others disobeyed direct Nazi orders to destroy the photos and negatives. They saved as many as 40,000 photos. The photos of Czesɫawa and thousands of others are now kept in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum (Block no. 6) and at Yad Vashem, in Israel. In an interview, Brasse recalled the occasion of photographing Czesɫawa: "She was so young and terrified. The girl didn't understand why she was there and she couldn't understand what was being said to her....Such a beautiful young girl, so innocent. She cried but she could do nothing." Czesɫawa did not survive. She died at age 14 years; the cause of death is uncertain.Menina polonesa vítima da brutalidade do nazismo, número do acampamento: 26947. Em sua foto podermos perceber o horror, a fome, e todo o sofrimento que só quem passou pelo horror de uma guerra pode descrever. Presa com sua mãe, morreu aos 14 anos, segundo informações de mídia aberta, com uma injeção letal de fenol em 12/03/1943.
A foto foi colorida pela artista brasileira Marina Amaral♥..•..•:*¨¨*:•..♥..•:*¨¨*:•..•..♥

Czesława was a Polish Catholic girl who was murdered at the age of 14 in Auschwitz. One of thousands of child victims of German World War II crimes against Poles in German-occupied Poland, she is among those memorialized in an Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum exhibit,

For, behold, I create new heavens and a new earth: and the former shall not be remembered, nor come into mind. Isaiah 65:17

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She is the daughter of Katarzyna Kwoka, born 15 August 1928 in Wólka Z³ojecka, Poland.
She was a Catholic Pole who entered Auschwitz on 13 Dec 1942. She was given prisoner number 26947.

After her arrival at Auschwitz, Czesawa Kwoka was photographed for the Reich's concentration camp records, and she has been identified as one of the approximately 40,000 to 50,000 subjects of such "identity pictures" taken under duress at Auschwitz-Birkenau by Wilhelm Brasse, a young Polish inmate in his twenties (known as Auschwitz prisoner number 3444). Trained as a portrait photographer at his aunt's studio prior to the 1939 German invasion of Poland beginning World War II, Brasse and others had been ordered to photograph inmates by their Nazi captors, under dreadful camp conditions and likely imminent death if the photographers refused to comply.

These photographs that he and others were ordered to take capture each inmate "in three poses: from the front and from each side." Though ordered to destroy all photographs and their negatives, Brasse became famous after the war for having helped to rescue some of them from oblivion.

Such acts of courage as Brasse's and his colleagues enabled many like Kwoka not to become forgotten as mere bureaucratic statistics, but to be remembered as individual human beings.

She died on 12 March 1943 from unknown causes. She was only 14-years-old.∼Auschwitz Nazi Concentration Camp

Prisoner of German Nazis

Czesɫawa Kwoka (pronounced in Polish Ches- wah-vah Kvoh - kah) was a Polish child born in Wolka Zɫojecka, Poland who died in the Auschwitz Nazi Concentration Camp during World War II. She was prisoner number 26947 who was one of approximately 230,000 children and young people who were arbitrarily detained and deported to Auschwitz from 1940 to 1945. Czesɫawa was deported and transported from Zamosc, Poland on December 13, 1942. She was one of thousands who were photographed for the Reich's concentration camp records ("identity photographs"). Her photos were taken under duress by Wilhelm Brasse, a trained portrait photographer, himself a Polish inmate in his twenties. As the war was coming to an end, Brasse (prisoner number 3444) and others disobeyed direct Nazi orders to destroy the photos and negatives. They saved as many as 40,000 photos. The photos of Czesɫawa and thousands of others are now kept in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum (Block no. 6) and at Yad Vashem, in Israel. In an interview, Brasse recalled the occasion of photographing Czesɫawa: "She was so young and terrified. The girl didn't understand why she was there and she couldn't understand what was being said to her....Such a beautiful young girl, so innocent. She cried but she could do nothing."

Czesɫawa did not survive. She died at age 14 years; the cause of death is uncertain.

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