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 Frank Marshall Davis

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Frank Marshall Davis

Birth
Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas, USA
Death
26 Jul 1987 (aged 81)
Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown
Memorial ID
143033403 View Source

African American journalist, poet, political and labor movement activist, and businessman.

Son of Sam Davis and Jessie L. Marshall Davis.
_______
Honolulu Star-Bulletin (Honolulu, Hawaii)
29 Jul 1987, Wed • Page 10

Accomplished black poet Frank M. Davis is Dead

Frank Marshall Davis, 81, of Honolulu, died Sunday in Honolulu. He was a renowned black poet and former newspaperman. Family services will be private.
Mr. Davis' work has appeared in 75 anthologies published in and North and South American, and Europe. He wrote three volumes of poetry; "Black Man's Verse" in 1935, "I am the American Negro" in 1937, and "47th Street in 1948, the year he moved to Honolulu.
Starting in 1967, selected poems of his have been reprinted in public schools and college textbooks for general use throughout the United States.
He received a Julius Rosenwald Fellowship in poetry in 1937.
Mr Davis was born in Arkansas City, Kansas, December 31, 1905. He was a graduate of Kansas State College in Manhattan, where he studied journalism. He also attended Friends University in Wichita, Kansas.
He was the managing editor of the Atlanta Daily World, which was the first successful Negro daily in America.
In Chicago, he was the executive editor of the Associated Negro Press, a news distributing agency for the nations black newspapers.
In Chicago, he taught the history of jazz music at the Abraham Lincoln School.
He was a charter member and vice-president of the Hot (Jazz) Club of Chicago, and had a daily radio jazz show on station WJJD. His personal collection of jazz records was considered to be one of the best in Honolulu.
In Honolulu, he was a columnist for the now-defunct Honolulu Record from 1949 to 1957. He also operated Paradise Paper Co. and sold advertising specialties.
He was a board member of the National Committee to Combat Anti-Semitism and appeared in 1944 before the Democratic Platform Committee to plead for a plank outlawing anti-Semitism.
He served on the publicity staff of the Republican National Committee in 1936 and 1940, and for presidential campaigns
A collection of his published and unpublished work is in progress.
He is survived by a son, Mark; four daughters, Lynn Ockerman; Beth Charlton, Jeanne Hyde and five grandchildren.

African American journalist, poet, political and labor movement activist, and businessman.

Son of Sam Davis and Jessie L. Marshall Davis.
_______
Honolulu Star-Bulletin (Honolulu, Hawaii)
29 Jul 1987, Wed • Page 10

Accomplished black poet Frank M. Davis is Dead

Frank Marshall Davis, 81, of Honolulu, died Sunday in Honolulu. He was a renowned black poet and former newspaperman. Family services will be private.
Mr. Davis' work has appeared in 75 anthologies published in and North and South American, and Europe. He wrote three volumes of poetry; "Black Man's Verse" in 1935, "I am the American Negro" in 1937, and "47th Street in 1948, the year he moved to Honolulu.
Starting in 1967, selected poems of his have been reprinted in public schools and college textbooks for general use throughout the United States.
He received a Julius Rosenwald Fellowship in poetry in 1937.
Mr Davis was born in Arkansas City, Kansas, December 31, 1905. He was a graduate of Kansas State College in Manhattan, where he studied journalism. He also attended Friends University in Wichita, Kansas.
He was the managing editor of the Atlanta Daily World, which was the first successful Negro daily in America.
In Chicago, he was the executive editor of the Associated Negro Press, a news distributing agency for the nations black newspapers.
In Chicago, he taught the history of jazz music at the Abraham Lincoln School.
He was a charter member and vice-president of the Hot (Jazz) Club of Chicago, and had a daily radio jazz show on station WJJD. His personal collection of jazz records was considered to be one of the best in Honolulu.
In Honolulu, he was a columnist for the now-defunct Honolulu Record from 1949 to 1957. He also operated Paradise Paper Co. and sold advertising specialties.
He was a board member of the National Committee to Combat Anti-Semitism and appeared in 1944 before the Democratic Platform Committee to plead for a plank outlawing anti-Semitism.
He served on the publicity staff of the Republican National Committee in 1936 and 1940, and for presidential campaigns
A collection of his published and unpublished work is in progress.
He is survived by a son, Mark; four daughters, Lynn Ockerman; Beth Charlton, Jeanne Hyde and five grandchildren.


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