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Dr Warren M. Angell

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Dr Warren M. Angell

Birth
Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, USA
Death
6 May 2006 (aged 98)
Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
Burial
Rock Creek Township, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Copied with permission from the Shawnee News-Star:
May 9, 2006:

SHAWNEE -- Dr. Warren M. Angell, dean emeritus of Oklahoma Baptist University's Warren M. Angell College of Fine Arts, died Saturday morning in Asheville, N.C. He was 98.
Funeral services will be in Potter Auditorium of OBU's John Wesley Raley Chapel at 2 p.m. Friday. Burial will follow the ceremony, in Shawnee's Resthaven Memorial Park Cemetery.

"Dr. Angell epitomized Oklahoma Baptist University," said OBU President Mark Brister. "He was a gifted educator who poured his life into the lives of his students. He used his gifts to strengthen Christian ministry, through those he trained and sent out, and through his personal work with musicians across the country. His legacy is one which we strive to uphold on our campus.

"We were able to visit last fall, as he was inducted into the Oklahoma State Higher Education Hall of Fame," Brister said. "That was a prominent moment in history, as we celebrated his leadership and achievement. We are grateful for the influence Warren Angell has had and will continue to have on Oklahoma Baptist University."

Angell died just one week before his 99th birthday. He suffered a stroke April 26, and had been hospitalized since that time.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on May 13, 1907, Angell graduated from Ilion, N.Y., High School, and received both bachelor and master of music degrees in piano and composition from Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y. He earned a doctor of education degree from Columbia University Teachers College in 1944. He spent four summers studying in Europe and did summer study at the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, N.Y.

Angell taught piano and theory at Murray State Teachers College, Murray, Ky., as head of the piano department from 1934-36.

Angell moved to Oklahoma in 1936 when he was named dean of the College of Fine Arts and professor of piano, organ, and theory at OBU --a school that was struggling for survival in the midst of the Great Depression.

"OBU seemed to offer what I wanted -- a chance to settle somewhere and grow with the school," Angell said.

Over the next 37 years, Angell built a College of Fine Arts with a faculty of 29 and an enrollment of 300. In addition to his academic leadership, he was a respected teacher, a noted composer and arranger, a widely recognized pianist, and a well-known choral conductor.

In 1938 he founded the Bison Glee Club and directed the organization until his retirement in 1973. He also founded the Bisonette Glee Club in 1954 and the Tuneclippers in 1962.

His work with choral techniques in the Bison Glee Club earned the group national prominence. During his tenure, the BGC made seven commercial records, appeared in 1965 on the Great Choirs of America "Voice of Christmas" series on NBC, and was featured on other television and radio programs.

Angell was granted a leave of absence from OBU from 1942 to 1944 to complete his doctoral work at Columbia. During his time in New York City, he sang top tenor with Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians and was a member of the Robert Shaw Collegiate Chorale, often singing solos.

He became OBU's key public relations representative and student recruiter by virtue of travel with his music groups and his leadership of choral workshops throughout the country. In 1956 the OBU board of trustees named the College of Fine Arts in his honor.

He wrote five books on vocal and choral techniques, published by Convention Press, Nashville, Tenn.

He had more than 53 published compositions in the choral field and four published piano numbers.
Copied with permission from the Shawnee News-Star:
May 9, 2006:

SHAWNEE -- Dr. Warren M. Angell, dean emeritus of Oklahoma Baptist University's Warren M. Angell College of Fine Arts, died Saturday morning in Asheville, N.C. He was 98.
Funeral services will be in Potter Auditorium of OBU's John Wesley Raley Chapel at 2 p.m. Friday. Burial will follow the ceremony, in Shawnee's Resthaven Memorial Park Cemetery.

"Dr. Angell epitomized Oklahoma Baptist University," said OBU President Mark Brister. "He was a gifted educator who poured his life into the lives of his students. He used his gifts to strengthen Christian ministry, through those he trained and sent out, and through his personal work with musicians across the country. His legacy is one which we strive to uphold on our campus.

"We were able to visit last fall, as he was inducted into the Oklahoma State Higher Education Hall of Fame," Brister said. "That was a prominent moment in history, as we celebrated his leadership and achievement. We are grateful for the influence Warren Angell has had and will continue to have on Oklahoma Baptist University."

Angell died just one week before his 99th birthday. He suffered a stroke April 26, and had been hospitalized since that time.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on May 13, 1907, Angell graduated from Ilion, N.Y., High School, and received both bachelor and master of music degrees in piano and composition from Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y. He earned a doctor of education degree from Columbia University Teachers College in 1944. He spent four summers studying in Europe and did summer study at the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, N.Y.

Angell taught piano and theory at Murray State Teachers College, Murray, Ky., as head of the piano department from 1934-36.

Angell moved to Oklahoma in 1936 when he was named dean of the College of Fine Arts and professor of piano, organ, and theory at OBU --a school that was struggling for survival in the midst of the Great Depression.

"OBU seemed to offer what I wanted -- a chance to settle somewhere and grow with the school," Angell said.

Over the next 37 years, Angell built a College of Fine Arts with a faculty of 29 and an enrollment of 300. In addition to his academic leadership, he was a respected teacher, a noted composer and arranger, a widely recognized pianist, and a well-known choral conductor.

In 1938 he founded the Bison Glee Club and directed the organization until his retirement in 1973. He also founded the Bisonette Glee Club in 1954 and the Tuneclippers in 1962.

His work with choral techniques in the Bison Glee Club earned the group national prominence. During his tenure, the BGC made seven commercial records, appeared in 1965 on the Great Choirs of America "Voice of Christmas" series on NBC, and was featured on other television and radio programs.

Angell was granted a leave of absence from OBU from 1942 to 1944 to complete his doctoral work at Columbia. During his time in New York City, he sang top tenor with Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians and was a member of the Robert Shaw Collegiate Chorale, often singing solos.

He became OBU's key public relations representative and student recruiter by virtue of travel with his music groups and his leadership of choral workshops throughout the country. In 1956 the OBU board of trustees named the College of Fine Arts in his honor.

He wrote five books on vocal and choral techniques, published by Convention Press, Nashville, Tenn.

He had more than 53 published compositions in the choral field and four published piano numbers.


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  • Maintained by: SBee
  • Originally Created by: Kay Sugg Best
  • Added: May 10, 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14247077/warren_m-angell: accessed ), memorial page for Dr Warren M. Angell (13 May 1907–6 May 2006), Find a Grave Memorial ID 14247077, citing Resthaven Memorial Park, Rock Creek Township, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, USA; Maintained by SBee (contributor 47990045).