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Rev. John Milton Akers

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Rev. John Milton Akers

Birth
Akersville, Fulton County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death
3 Feb 1889 (aged 52)
Saint Charles, Winona County, Minnesota, USA
Burial
Saint Charles, Winona County, Minnesota, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
Bedford, PA: Bedford Inquirer, issue of Friday, 11 October 1861, p. 1, col. 1

Poetry.

For the Inquirer.

OUR COUNTRY.

By Rev. J. Milton Akers.

May the God of our fathers defend
The land and the homes of the brave,
And grant that rebellion shall end,
And treason be laid in the grave.
May the morn of prosperity dawn,
And the bright sun of harmony rise,
May the clouds of disunion be gone
And darken no more our fair skies.

May "peace" be our ruler and king
With the coronet Liberty crowned,
Upon it the "banner" we sing
With the "eagle" and "peace branch" are found.
May his throne like a monument stand
O'er the top of contention's deep grave,
Whose ghost may not visit the land,
To trouble the white or the slave.

Next to God shall the land of my birth,
Be cherished as dear to my heart,
No nation so prosperous on earth
From my country I never shall part.
May our nation continue to shine,
As a star in God's galaxy here,
And brighten with glories divine,
Though eternity's unending year.

Bottle's Run, Md., Oct. 1st, 1861.
-----
For the Inquirer.

THE POET'S LAMENT.

By Rev. J. Milton Acres.

O, God! I am weary, forlorn and oppressed,
By care and anxiety deeply distressed.
The pride and the hope of my life's early day,
Forever from me have now passed away;
But the scar they have left though the fact it reveals,
The cause of my anguish forever conceals.
My harp that once trilled with the pleasures of youth,
Or echoed the songs of friendship and truth,
Is broken and silent, to tune it is vain,
It can never be wakened to music again.
Sometimes in a vision my youth reappears,
And I wander through vistas of happier years,
While o'er them the sunshine of realized bliss
Streams down for to contrast the former with this.
The home of my childhood, and friends that I knew,
Are standing before exposed to my view,
Loved ones are around me to welcome me home,
And tell me again that I never shall roam.
The cot of my fathers before me doth stand,
With the hills and the vales of my own native land,
My father and mother are waiting for me,
And sister and brother I plainly can see.
The one that I loved now responds to my knock,
There nothing is here my pleasure to mock,
I am perfectly happy no care in my breast,
No mortal on earth so supremely is blest.
But alas for my pleasures! my vision has flown,
And again I am silent, forsaken, alone.
I wearily wander a stranger below,
Surrounded by danger, temptation, and wo.
The home-place is silent since I am away,
The door-latch is rusty, the buildings decay;
The one that I loved is "no one knows where,"
While I am a stranger distracted with care.
My father and mother are far, far away,
And sister and brother are with them to-day.
O, Father in heaven! relieve my distress,
And grant that Thy presence my pathway may bless.
May Thy grace and Thy glory through Jesus be given,
And receive me at last in the kingdom of heaven.

Pleasant Grove, Md. 1861.
_______________________________

1880 MN Census: Olmsted Co. Byron Village, Church St., ed 212, p. 2, lines 18-20
Series T9, roll 628, dwelling 13, family 13, 3 June 1880

J. Milton AKERS, age 44, Married, M.E. Minister, b. Penna., parents b. Penna.
Millie, age 42, Wife, Married, Keeping house, b. Penna., parents b. Penna.
Nannie, age 6, dau, at school, b. Minn., parents b. Penna.
_______________________________

Altoona, PA: Altoona Tribune, issue of Thursday, 7 February 1889, p. 6, col. 5

Rev. J. Milton Akers.

The Rev. J. Milton Akers was born in Akersville, Fulton county, Pa., February 12, 1836, and died at the Methodist Episcopal parsonage in St. Charles, Minn., February 2, 1889.

Rev. Akers was admitted on trial in the East Baltimore annual conference of the Methodist Episcopal church at its session ion Chambersburg in March, 1861. He was ordained deacon in York in March, 1863, and elder in Danville in March, 1865. He was admitted to full membership in the East Baltimore conference in 1863. He became a member of the Central Pennsylvania conference in 1869 by the division of the conference, and was transferred to the Minnesota conference in 1870.

His fields of labor were successively as follows: 1861, Pleasant Grove, Md.; 1862, Clinton; 1863, Orangeville; 1864, Sunbury; 1865, La Porte; 1866, Elysburg; 1867, Newport; 1868, supernumerary; 1869, Principal Dravosburg high school; 1870-2, Sauk Centre and Osakis, Minn.; 1873-4, Princeton; 1875-7, Berlin; 1878-80, Byron; 1882-2, Faribault circuit; 1883, Reed's and Wabasha; 1884-6, Pine Island; 1887-8, St. Charles.

He had just closed a glorious revival in the church of which he was pastor, in which more than one hundred persons professed saving faith in Christ, when he was seized with pneumonia which rapidly bore away his life and he was at rest.

He came to the close of life in the full assurance of his royal kinship and destiny. His faith was unshaken, his prospect of a blissful immortality glorious.

He leaves a wife and daughter in Minnesota, and one brother, the Rev. J. Benson Akers, of Shrewsbury, Pa., to mourn their loss.
_______________________________

Hillside Cemetery, Saint Charles, Winona Co. MN
Findagrave memorial 141714672

In memory of
REV.
J. MILTON
AKERS.
Born in
Akersville, Pa.
Feb. 12, 1836
died at
St. Charles Minn.
[unclear] 1889
_______________________________
Bedford, PA: Bedford Inquirer, issue of Friday, 11 October 1861, p. 1, col. 1

Poetry.

For the Inquirer.

OUR COUNTRY.

By Rev. J. Milton Akers.

May the God of our fathers defend
The land and the homes of the brave,
And grant that rebellion shall end,
And treason be laid in the grave.
May the morn of prosperity dawn,
And the bright sun of harmony rise,
May the clouds of disunion be gone
And darken no more our fair skies.

May "peace" be our ruler and king
With the coronet Liberty crowned,
Upon it the "banner" we sing
With the "eagle" and "peace branch" are found.
May his throne like a monument stand
O'er the top of contention's deep grave,
Whose ghost may not visit the land,
To trouble the white or the slave.

Next to God shall the land of my birth,
Be cherished as dear to my heart,
No nation so prosperous on earth
From my country I never shall part.
May our nation continue to shine,
As a star in God's galaxy here,
And brighten with glories divine,
Though eternity's unending year.

Bottle's Run, Md., Oct. 1st, 1861.
-----
For the Inquirer.

THE POET'S LAMENT.

By Rev. J. Milton Acres.

O, God! I am weary, forlorn and oppressed,
By care and anxiety deeply distressed.
The pride and the hope of my life's early day,
Forever from me have now passed away;
But the scar they have left though the fact it reveals,
The cause of my anguish forever conceals.
My harp that once trilled with the pleasures of youth,
Or echoed the songs of friendship and truth,
Is broken and silent, to tune it is vain,
It can never be wakened to music again.
Sometimes in a vision my youth reappears,
And I wander through vistas of happier years,
While o'er them the sunshine of realized bliss
Streams down for to contrast the former with this.
The home of my childhood, and friends that I knew,
Are standing before exposed to my view,
Loved ones are around me to welcome me home,
And tell me again that I never shall roam.
The cot of my fathers before me doth stand,
With the hills and the vales of my own native land,
My father and mother are waiting for me,
And sister and brother I plainly can see.
The one that I loved now responds to my knock,
There nothing is here my pleasure to mock,
I am perfectly happy no care in my breast,
No mortal on earth so supremely is blest.
But alas for my pleasures! my vision has flown,
And again I am silent, forsaken, alone.
I wearily wander a stranger below,
Surrounded by danger, temptation, and wo.
The home-place is silent since I am away,
The door-latch is rusty, the buildings decay;
The one that I loved is "no one knows where,"
While I am a stranger distracted with care.
My father and mother are far, far away,
And sister and brother are with them to-day.
O, Father in heaven! relieve my distress,
And grant that Thy presence my pathway may bless.
May Thy grace and Thy glory through Jesus be given,
And receive me at last in the kingdom of heaven.

Pleasant Grove, Md. 1861.
_______________________________

1880 MN Census: Olmsted Co. Byron Village, Church St., ed 212, p. 2, lines 18-20
Series T9, roll 628, dwelling 13, family 13, 3 June 1880

J. Milton AKERS, age 44, Married, M.E. Minister, b. Penna., parents b. Penna.
Millie, age 42, Wife, Married, Keeping house, b. Penna., parents b. Penna.
Nannie, age 6, dau, at school, b. Minn., parents b. Penna.
_______________________________

Altoona, PA: Altoona Tribune, issue of Thursday, 7 February 1889, p. 6, col. 5

Rev. J. Milton Akers.

The Rev. J. Milton Akers was born in Akersville, Fulton county, Pa., February 12, 1836, and died at the Methodist Episcopal parsonage in St. Charles, Minn., February 2, 1889.

Rev. Akers was admitted on trial in the East Baltimore annual conference of the Methodist Episcopal church at its session ion Chambersburg in March, 1861. He was ordained deacon in York in March, 1863, and elder in Danville in March, 1865. He was admitted to full membership in the East Baltimore conference in 1863. He became a member of the Central Pennsylvania conference in 1869 by the division of the conference, and was transferred to the Minnesota conference in 1870.

His fields of labor were successively as follows: 1861, Pleasant Grove, Md.; 1862, Clinton; 1863, Orangeville; 1864, Sunbury; 1865, La Porte; 1866, Elysburg; 1867, Newport; 1868, supernumerary; 1869, Principal Dravosburg high school; 1870-2, Sauk Centre and Osakis, Minn.; 1873-4, Princeton; 1875-7, Berlin; 1878-80, Byron; 1882-2, Faribault circuit; 1883, Reed's and Wabasha; 1884-6, Pine Island; 1887-8, St. Charles.

He had just closed a glorious revival in the church of which he was pastor, in which more than one hundred persons professed saving faith in Christ, when he was seized with pneumonia which rapidly bore away his life and he was at rest.

He came to the close of life in the full assurance of his royal kinship and destiny. His faith was unshaken, his prospect of a blissful immortality glorious.

He leaves a wife and daughter in Minnesota, and one brother, the Rev. J. Benson Akers, of Shrewsbury, Pa., to mourn their loss.
_______________________________

Hillside Cemetery, Saint Charles, Winona Co. MN
Findagrave memorial 141714672

In memory of
REV.
J. MILTON
AKERS.
Born in
Akersville, Pa.
Feb. 12, 1836
died at
St. Charles Minn.
[unclear] 1889
_______________________________


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