Advertisement

Lieut James G. Howard

Advertisement

Lieut James G. Howard

Birth
Death
7 Dec 1895 (aged 56)
Burial
Brattleboro, Windham County, Vermont, USA
Memorial ID
14163799 View Source

James G. Howard, a prominent farmer of this place, was accidentally killed in the woods while drawing logs with his horse. His body was discovered about 5 o'clock last Saturday night with his neck broke. Mr. Howard was in the employ of the Estery Organ Company here for many years and was an old soldier. He leaves a widow and one sister.

Bellows Falls times., December 12, 1895

Lieut. James G. Howard was instantly killed Saturday afternoon in some manner which will probably never be exactly know. He left his home on the old Newfane road in district No 6. about 2 o'clock to draw to the main road trees which had been cut on the northeast part of his farm. About 5 o'clock Mrs. Howard Johnson became alarmed at her husband a long absence and summoned her brother and nearest neighbor, Joel S. Johnson, who started out to investigate. Mr. Johnson found that the horse had come to a point near the main road, and had stopped there, the tree which was being dragged having caught in the brush. Going further down the lot into the hoods Mr. Johnson was horrified to find Mr. Howard's body, cold and stiff in death. He was lying with his face upon a rock, his arms extended at his sides. the appearance of the body was almost that of a person who had lain down to sleep. C. S. Wall and other neighbors, who had also been around and who appeared soon after Mr. Johnson reached the body, assisted him in carrying it to the house. An examination by Dr. Holton showed that Mr. Howard's neck was broken, causing instant death. There was a contusion on one side of the face, made by striking the rock in falling, but there were no other marks on the body. The most reasonable theory is that Mr. Howard was thrown by catching his foot on a bush or small stump and fell headlong, striking with sufficient force to break his neck. Others thing that he may have been hit by a falling limb. There is, however, nothing about the spot where he was found to indicate exactly the way in which he was killed. James G. Howard was born in Keene, N. H., in July, 1839. His father moved to this town when he was a small boy, and the larger part of Mr. Howard's life was spent here; since 1865 he has lived here continuously. As a young man Mr. Howard was employed in different capacities, and he was in New York state near the Vermont border when he determined to answer his country's call. He enlisted Oct. 26, 1861, 15 days later was made first sergeant, and Dec. 24, 1864, he received his commission as first lieutenant of the company. He was mustered out of the service July 15, 1865. He was shot through the left arm in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, but was back in his company in about two months. Few soldiers who wore the blue had records equal to that of Lieut. James G. Howard. He was a Yankee fighter of the best type. He was in 26 engagements, and a cooler man under fire never went from Vermont. Not only was his record for bravery of the highest, but in the trying days when the young man in the ranks were beset by so many temptations he never faltered from the path of Christian rectitude. He was never known to touch liquor or tobacco, nor to engage in any questionable action during the days that he was at the front. He was, in brief, a Christian soldier, and a worthy example to the other Vermonters of the Second regiment. This regiment had its share in almost every battle fought by the Army of the Potomae from the first Bull Run to the surrender of Lee, and its quality as a fighting regiment is indicated by the fact that its list of killed and wounded in action numbered no less than 751, or 40 per cent of the aggregate of 1858 officers and men, while its ratio of killed and mortally wounded was more than eight times the general ratio of killed and mortally wounded in the Union army. Brattleboro people have a special interest in the Second regiment. It was while Lieut. Col. John S. Tyler was acting as its commander in the battle of the Wilderness that he received his death wound. The later Major Elijah Wales was one of the officers of the regiment who distinguished himself for gallantry. The first man in the Vermont troops who was killed in action was Russell H. Benjamin of Brattleboro, a corporal in company C. He was struck by a fragment of a shell at the first battle of Bull Run and instantly killed. After the war Lieut. Howard returned to Brattleboro and in a short time began work for J. Estey & Co. He continued in the employ of the organ company until 1892, for several years carrying work to his home. He had lived on the farm in district No. 6 about ten years. Mr. Howard and Miss Mary Johnson of Stamford were married in that town in May, 1866. Mrs. Howard has been in feeble health for several years. Mr. Howard also leaves one sister, who is the wife of Joel P. Butterfield of Marlboro. The funeral was held at the house Tuesday, Rev. Mr. Temple of the Baptist church, of which Mr. Howard was a member, delivered the funeral sermon, and Rev. Mr. Smith of West Brattleboro spoke of Mr. Howard's characteristics. Six Grand Army comrades acted as bearers - Col. H. E. Taylor, J. P. Elmer, R. N. Hescock, H. I. Bangs, P. S. Chase, A. F. Wilder. About 30 members of Sedgwick post did escort duty as the procession moved from the common to the Prospect Hill cemetery. Lieut Howard displayed as a citizen the manly qualities which characterized him as a soldier - unassuming, of unquestioned probity, and possessed of the moral courage which led him always to do his duty, and made him a man upon whom absolute dependence could be placed.

Vermont Phoenix., December 13, 1895

James G. Howard, a prominent farmer of this place, was accidentally killed in the woods while drawing logs with his horse. His body was discovered about 5 o'clock last Saturday night with his neck broke. Mr. Howard was in the employ of the Estery Organ Company here for many years and was an old soldier. He leaves a widow and one sister.

Bellows Falls times., December 12, 1895

Lieut. James G. Howard was instantly killed Saturday afternoon in some manner which will probably never be exactly know. He left his home on the old Newfane road in district No 6. about 2 o'clock to draw to the main road trees which had been cut on the northeast part of his farm. About 5 o'clock Mrs. Howard Johnson became alarmed at her husband a long absence and summoned her brother and nearest neighbor, Joel S. Johnson, who started out to investigate. Mr. Johnson found that the horse had come to a point near the main road, and had stopped there, the tree which was being dragged having caught in the brush. Going further down the lot into the hoods Mr. Johnson was horrified to find Mr. Howard's body, cold and stiff in death. He was lying with his face upon a rock, his arms extended at his sides. the appearance of the body was almost that of a person who had lain down to sleep. C. S. Wall and other neighbors, who had also been around and who appeared soon after Mr. Johnson reached the body, assisted him in carrying it to the house. An examination by Dr. Holton showed that Mr. Howard's neck was broken, causing instant death. There was a contusion on one side of the face, made by striking the rock in falling, but there were no other marks on the body. The most reasonable theory is that Mr. Howard was thrown by catching his foot on a bush or small stump and fell headlong, striking with sufficient force to break his neck. Others thing that he may have been hit by a falling limb. There is, however, nothing about the spot where he was found to indicate exactly the way in which he was killed. James G. Howard was born in Keene, N. H., in July, 1839. His father moved to this town when he was a small boy, and the larger part of Mr. Howard's life was spent here; since 1865 he has lived here continuously. As a young man Mr. Howard was employed in different capacities, and he was in New York state near the Vermont border when he determined to answer his country's call. He enlisted Oct. 26, 1861, 15 days later was made first sergeant, and Dec. 24, 1864, he received his commission as first lieutenant of the company. He was mustered out of the service July 15, 1865. He was shot through the left arm in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, but was back in his company in about two months. Few soldiers who wore the blue had records equal to that of Lieut. James G. Howard. He was a Yankee fighter of the best type. He was in 26 engagements, and a cooler man under fire never went from Vermont. Not only was his record for bravery of the highest, but in the trying days when the young man in the ranks were beset by so many temptations he never faltered from the path of Christian rectitude. He was never known to touch liquor or tobacco, nor to engage in any questionable action during the days that he was at the front. He was, in brief, a Christian soldier, and a worthy example to the other Vermonters of the Second regiment. This regiment had its share in almost every battle fought by the Army of the Potomae from the first Bull Run to the surrender of Lee, and its quality as a fighting regiment is indicated by the fact that its list of killed and wounded in action numbered no less than 751, or 40 per cent of the aggregate of 1858 officers and men, while its ratio of killed and mortally wounded was more than eight times the general ratio of killed and mortally wounded in the Union army. Brattleboro people have a special interest in the Second regiment. It was while Lieut. Col. John S. Tyler was acting as its commander in the battle of the Wilderness that he received his death wound. The later Major Elijah Wales was one of the officers of the regiment who distinguished himself for gallantry. The first man in the Vermont troops who was killed in action was Russell H. Benjamin of Brattleboro, a corporal in company C. He was struck by a fragment of a shell at the first battle of Bull Run and instantly killed. After the war Lieut. Howard returned to Brattleboro and in a short time began work for J. Estey & Co. He continued in the employ of the organ company until 1892, for several years carrying work to his home. He had lived on the farm in district No. 6 about ten years. Mr. Howard and Miss Mary Johnson of Stamford were married in that town in May, 1866. Mrs. Howard has been in feeble health for several years. Mr. Howard also leaves one sister, who is the wife of Joel P. Butterfield of Marlboro. The funeral was held at the house Tuesday, Rev. Mr. Temple of the Baptist church, of which Mr. Howard was a member, delivered the funeral sermon, and Rev. Mr. Smith of West Brattleboro spoke of Mr. Howard's characteristics. Six Grand Army comrades acted as bearers - Col. H. E. Taylor, J. P. Elmer, R. N. Hescock, H. I. Bangs, P. S. Chase, A. F. Wilder. About 30 members of Sedgwick post did escort duty as the procession moved from the common to the Prospect Hill cemetery. Lieut Howard displayed as a citizen the manly qualities which characterized him as a soldier - unassuming, of unquestioned probity, and possessed of the moral courage which led him always to do his duty, and made him a man upon whom absolute dependence could be placed.

Vermont Phoenix., December 13, 1895


Inscription

Co. A. 2nd Regt Vt Vols


Family Members

Parents
Spouse

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement