Archibald Llewellyn Williams

Archibald Llewellyn Williams

Birth
Quincy, Adams County, Illinois, USA
Death 28 Aug 1907 (aged 66)
Mountain View, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA
Burial Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, USA
Memorial ID 139511839 · View Source
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For additional information please visit:
http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/304714
http://www.kshs.org/archives/304714
http://www.kshs.org/archives/40544
Archibald L. Williams, son of Judge Williams, located in Kansas in 1861, a short time before his father came to the State, and entered upon the practice of the law, a profession in which his eminence is only second to that of his distinguished father. At different times he served as city and county attorney and for four years he was acting United States attorney. In 1870 and again in 1872, he was elected by the Republican party, Attorney General of Kansas. For years and from its beginning, he was consulting attorney for the old Kansas Pacific Railroad Company at Topeka and continued in office with the different railroad organizations which succeeded it. In 1887 he became general attorney for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, in Kansas, a position requiring every
qualification of an able, experienced, tactful and judicious lawyer.
While Mr. Williams' eminence in the profession is well known in all
departments of the law, his services to the State, in 1874, in curtailing the fraudulent organizing of western counties, added credit to an administration of the attorney generalship, which in every feature had been a credit to the State. It was through his almost unaided efforts that the practice of organizing western counties by fraud was broken up. A short time previously, the counties of Barbour (since changed to Barber), Harper and Comanche had been organized,
and they had issued, between them, about $250,000 in bonds. This sum had, to put it mildly, been unloaded partly on the State School Fund but more extensively on unsuspecting Eastern investors. In the course of time this produced trouble and a public investigation was demanded. The Legislature appointed an investigating committee which was composed of one member from each House and the Attorney
General, Mr. Williams. The member of the Senate and the member of the House started out on a tour of investigation as ordered, but certain ones who had reason to fear a searching visit of the authorities had devised a scheme by which Justice should be turned aside and they should go their way without molestation, Those were days when
Indian outrages were not uncommon and as the legislators were only human and had families dependent upon them, they gave credence to the tales poured in their ears of savage uprisings in the far western counties whither their duty led them and prudently turned back. When this scheme was tried on Attorney General Williams, the conspirators found they had to deal with a man of different mettle. He made his way to the lands in question, visiting Barbour, Harper and Comanche counties and returned alive and very willing to make a report. He found
that Barbour County had a few bona fide residents although not numerous enough to legalize the organization of the county, but that Harper and Comanche counties were not settled at all. The meaningless report submitted by the other members of the committee, from hearsay, was supplemented by that of the Attorney General and it has been preserved not only as a historic paper but as a contribution to humorous literature. We submit an excerpt: "There is no population in Comanche County. If Marius sat amid the ruins of Carthage and wept, I camped upon the town-site of Smallwood, the county-seat, and feasted upon wild turkey, with no white man to molest or make me afraid. In
Smallwood there are two log cabins, both deserted, without doors, windows, sash or blinds. About a mile off is a deserted ranch. These compose the houses of the householders of the county. In this county there is not an acre of land or a dollar's worth of property subject to taxation; its sole inhabitants are the Cheyennes and the coyote, the wolf and the Arrapahoes, and its organization is and always has been a fraud. Harper and Comanche counties were organized solely for plunder. The vast amount of bonds issued has seriously injured our credit abroad. To issue these bonds required wholesale perjury and forgery. When these counties are properly attached to some other county for judicial purposes, the thieves who issued these bonds should be attended to. The State, through its Attorney General and the proper county attorneys, should put every engine of the law in force; should pursue, capture, try, convict and lock up these rogues, so that our credit may be restored and other incipient rascals of a like character,
quickened with a similar ambition, may be deterred from the crime through a fear of a like fate." This vigorous protest had the effect desired and the whole credit rests with Mr. Williams. He still continues in the practice of his profession and his name still is, as it always has been, held in the highest honor. On August 28, 1862, Archibald L. Williams was married in Posey County, Indiana, to Elizabeth (Cloud) Ferguson, and they have six children, all of whom are residents of Topeka. Extracted from: HISTORY OF SHAWNEE COUNTY, KANSAS
AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS




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  • Maintained by: Downing
  • Originally Created by: Susan
  • Added: 2 Dec 2014
  • Find a Grave Memorial 139511839
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Archibald Llewellyn Williams (2 Sep 1840–28 Aug 1907), Find a Grave Memorial no. 139511839, citing Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, USA ; Maintained by Downing (contributor 47086797) .