Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh

Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh

Birth
Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, USA
Death 17 Nov 1977 (aged 86)
Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Burial Mayfield Heights, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Plot Sec. B, Lot 803, E/C
Memorial ID 13777043 · View Source
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Major League Baseball Player, Manager. He's best known for being the youngest manager in big-league history and the American League's Most Valuable Player in 1925. The shortstop played 17 years for the Cleveland Naps (1910 to 1913), the New York Highlanders/Yankees (1913 to 1921), the Washington Senators (1922 to 1926) and the Chicago White Sox (1927). The Indians traded him to the Highlanders on May 20, 1913 for shortstop Bill Stumpf and outfielder Jack Lelivelt. At age 23, he replaced manager Frank Chance on September 16, 1914 and guided the team the rest of the season to a 10-10 record. Wild Bill Donovan took the reins in 1915. His best years with the Yankees were 1920 and 1921. He hit .270 with 109 runs scored in 1920 and followed that up with .288 with 128 runs scored. He played in the 1921 World Series against the crosstown Giants, who won in eight games, and he batted only .179. The Yankees dealt him with pitchers Jack Quinn, Harry "Rip" Collins and Bill Piercy to Boston in December 1921 for shortstop Everett Scott and pitchers Joe Bush and Sad Sam Jones. The Red Sox, in turn, shipped him to the Senators on January 10, 1922 in a three-cornered trade that also involved the Philadelphia Athletics. When the Senators beat the Giants in seven in the 1924 World Series, he batted .417 (5 for 12). During his MVP year he hit .272 with 20 doubles and a career-high 73 runs batted in, but the 1925 World Series was a disaster for him as he committed a record eight errors in Pittsburgh's seven-game triumph. He was traded to the White Sox on January 15, 1927 for pitchers Hollis "Sloppy" Thurston and Leo Mangum. His lifetime statistics were .259 for 2,012 games played with 256 doubles, 48 homers, 739 RBIs, 1,006 runs scored and 207 stolen bases. He managed the Indians from 1928 to 1933. His team went 62-92 and finished in seventh place in 1928, but the Indians climbed to third with an 81-71 record in 1929. Then came three consecutive fourth-place finishes with records of 81-73, 78-76 and 87-65. With the club at 26-25 and in fourth place in 1933, he was fired on June 7 and replaced by Walter Johnson. After a player rebellion, led by Mel Harder, Hal Trosky, Bob Feller, Jeff Heath, Odell Hale, Oscar Grimes and others, against manager Oscar Vitt during the 1940 season earning them the "Cry Babies" nickname, the Indians again turned to Peckinpaugh for the 1941 campaign. The change was made despite the club finishing just one game behind the Detroit Tigers for the pennant. Cleveland wound up tied for fourth with Detroit in 1941 with a 75-79 record and, in an ironic twist, he was replaced by 24-year-old shortstop Lou Boudreau. He then moved into the general manager's job and served until Bill Veeck acquired the team in 1946.

Bio by: Ron Coons



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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Ron Coons
  • Added: 29 Mar 2006
  • Find A Grave Memorial 13777043
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh (5 Feb 1891–17 Nov 1977), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13777043, citing Acacia Masonic Memorial Park Cemetery, Mayfield Heights, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .