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 Edwin Augustus Abbott

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Edwin Augustus Abbott

Birth
Westborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Death 20 Jan 1876 (aged 64)
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Burial Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA
Plot Section: B, Lot: 129, Grave: 9
Memorial ID 137270485 View Source
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"Edwin A. Abbott, the later U.S. Shipping Commissioner, died at his residence, No. 113 South High Street, in the 66th year of his age, had been confined to the house after paralysis, since July last, and another attack occurred on Tuesday last, causing death at midnight, Wednesday. Mr. Abbott, who was a brother of Horace Abbott of the Abbott Rolling Mills, at Canton, was a native of Massachusetts. He came to Baltimore nearly a half century ago, and engaged on the manufacture of doors and sash in Canton, his being the direct and only factory of that kind in Baltimore. He afterwards carried on a saw mill near the drawbridge on Westfall Avenue, and also built a steam flour mill built in connection with his saw mill, and we believe this to have been the first steam mill built in the city. These mills were operated by Mr. Edwin Abbott and his sons up to about the close of the War, when the property was sold to the Calvert Sugar Refining Company, and is now occupied by that company. Mr. Abbott was a staunch Union man, and was appointed United States Shipping Commissioner in August 1872, when the Shipping Act was passed by Congress, which created the position. He was a resident for nearly forty years in the house in which he died, was school commissioner for the fourth ward for a number of terms, was a member of the Legislature in 1856, and was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1861 that abolished slavery in Maryland." (Baltimore American, January 21, 1876).

The first article of the Constitution of Maryland was prepared by Mr. Abbott, and it reads, " All men are born equally free and are entitled to the proceeds of their own labor."

Edwin was a carpenter by training and started the first sash, door, and blind factory in Baltimore. An inventor, he developed and manufactured the first band saw in 1853 and another machine for cutting barrel staves, though he never bothered to patent either. He was prominently connected with the 2nd Presbyterian Church in Baltimore from 1840 to his death in 1876.
His widow moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming, to live with her daughter Lucie Ella Abbott Freeborn.


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