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Dr Joseph Goldberger

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Dr Joseph Goldberger Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Giraltovce, okres Svidník, Prešovský, Slovakia
Death
17 Jan 1929 (aged 54)
Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA
Burial
Cremated, Ashes scattered. Specifically: Over the Potomac River, Washington, DC Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Physician. He discovered the causes and effect of pellagra, which eliminated the disease from the United States. Born in Europe's Austro-Hungarian Empire, near what is now defined as Slovakia, his family immigrated to America in November 1883, where they joined his older brothers. Settling in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, his father Samuel opened a grocery store where Joseph and his younger brothers helped and made deliveries. The family encouraged education. Joseph was a bright student and excelled in mathematics and science, graduating at age 16, he went on to study engineering. At age 18 Joseph attended a lecture with a friend at Bellevue Hospital Medical School. The professor's talk about the human body caught Joseph and changed his life. He immediately decided to go into medicine. Borrowing money from his half-brother he began his studies, graduating with honors, completing his internship in 1897. Deciding that private practice was not really for him, Joseph wanted to perform medical research, to figure out better ways to treat patients. Once again a friend pointed the way to the U.S. Marine Hospital Service, looking for medical officers. June 1899, Joseph went to the next phase of the hiring process, difficult oral and written exams, diagnosing illnesses inpatients and identifying microorganisms under a microscope. Just after his twenty-fifth birthday, Joseph was accepted and became an assistant surgeon in the Marine Hospital Service. Other posts and challenges followed, Joseph was not only exposed, but contracted and survived yellow fever in 1902 while in Mexico, when in Texas the dengue fever and contracting typhus after being bitten by an infected monkey. In the summer of 1909, Surgeon General Walter Wyman, sent Joseph to investigate a strange skin disease causing strange red rashes. People had been suffering for eight years from this unexplained rash, causing great discomfort, itching so badly they could not sleep. His methodology of examining locations of the outbreak, the homes and ships, talking to the physicians, the patients and the families and his keen observations, quickly led him to rule out what others had theorized. Joseph searched for a common factor and discovered the victims all slept on straw stuffed bedding. Using himself as a test subject, he placed his arm between the mattress for over an hour. The next morning the same rash developed as he'd observed on the patients. Joseph then shook out a mattress, sieved the dust and examined under a lens the tiny mites responsible for so much misery. After eight years of this medical mystery, Joseph Goldberger had figured out the cause and effect in only a few days. In early 1914 with the reassignment from then Surgeon General Rupert Blue, Joseph Goldberger would be set on the path of his life's work, joining the pellagra investigation. Dr. Joseph Goldberger would spend the rest of his life examining and investigating the disease of pellagra. Often called 'red death' and 'red madness' his research, field trials and deductions would eventually define and eliminate pellagra as a cause of death in the United States. Joseph eliminated all of the transmission vectors until only one remained - diet. His fifteen years of untiring effort lead to the results that dietary education and inexpensive supplements, such as brewer's yeast, could not only prevent pellagra, but even reverse the effects on patients with advanced symptoms. His dynamic research methods, careful notes and observations lead to the elimination of pellagra as a cause of death, especially in the southern US. Fall of 1928, Dr. Joseph Goldberger found himself not feeling well and losing weight, quickly becoming unable to go the laboratory each day. His collages would come to him to discuss results of ongoing experiments. On Thursday 17 January 1929, the fifty-four year old Dr. Joseph Goldberger died in the Naval Hospital, Washington, DC. After his death an autopsy revealed a rare kidney cancer as his cause of death. His body was cremated and his ashes were scattered over the Potomac River.
Physician. He discovered the causes and effect of pellagra, which eliminated the disease from the United States. Born in Europe's Austro-Hungarian Empire, near what is now defined as Slovakia, his family immigrated to America in November 1883, where they joined his older brothers. Settling in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, his father Samuel opened a grocery store where Joseph and his younger brothers helped and made deliveries. The family encouraged education. Joseph was a bright student and excelled in mathematics and science, graduating at age 16, he went on to study engineering. At age 18 Joseph attended a lecture with a friend at Bellevue Hospital Medical School. The professor's talk about the human body caught Joseph and changed his life. He immediately decided to go into medicine. Borrowing money from his half-brother he began his studies, graduating with honors, completing his internship in 1897. Deciding that private practice was not really for him, Joseph wanted to perform medical research, to figure out better ways to treat patients. Once again a friend pointed the way to the U.S. Marine Hospital Service, looking for medical officers. June 1899, Joseph went to the next phase of the hiring process, difficult oral and written exams, diagnosing illnesses inpatients and identifying microorganisms under a microscope. Just after his twenty-fifth birthday, Joseph was accepted and became an assistant surgeon in the Marine Hospital Service. Other posts and challenges followed, Joseph was not only exposed, but contracted and survived yellow fever in 1902 while in Mexico, when in Texas the dengue fever and contracting typhus after being bitten by an infected monkey. In the summer of 1909, Surgeon General Walter Wyman, sent Joseph to investigate a strange skin disease causing strange red rashes. People had been suffering for eight years from this unexplained rash, causing great discomfort, itching so badly they could not sleep. His methodology of examining locations of the outbreak, the homes and ships, talking to the physicians, the patients and the families and his keen observations, quickly led him to rule out what others had theorized. Joseph searched for a common factor and discovered the victims all slept on straw stuffed bedding. Using himself as a test subject, he placed his arm between the mattress for over an hour. The next morning the same rash developed as he'd observed on the patients. Joseph then shook out a mattress, sieved the dust and examined under a lens the tiny mites responsible for so much misery. After eight years of this medical mystery, Joseph Goldberger had figured out the cause and effect in only a few days. In early 1914 with the reassignment from then Surgeon General Rupert Blue, Joseph Goldberger would be set on the path of his life's work, joining the pellagra investigation. Dr. Joseph Goldberger would spend the rest of his life examining and investigating the disease of pellagra. Often called 'red death' and 'red madness' his research, field trials and deductions would eventually define and eliminate pellagra as a cause of death in the United States. Joseph eliminated all of the transmission vectors until only one remained - diet. His fifteen years of untiring effort lead to the results that dietary education and inexpensive supplements, such as brewer's yeast, could not only prevent pellagra, but even reverse the effects on patients with advanced symptoms. His dynamic research methods, careful notes and observations lead to the elimination of pellagra as a cause of death, especially in the southern US. Fall of 1928, Dr. Joseph Goldberger found himself not feeling well and losing weight, quickly becoming unable to go the laboratory each day. His collages would come to him to discuss results of ongoing experiments. On Thursday 17 January 1929, the fifty-four year old Dr. Joseph Goldberger died in the Naval Hospital, Washington, DC. After his death an autopsy revealed a rare kidney cancer as his cause of death. His body was cremated and his ashes were scattered over the Potomac River.

Bio by: Gaye Hill



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Gaye Hill
  • Added: Oct 4, 2014
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/136792685/joseph-goldberger: accessed ), memorial page for Dr Joseph Goldberger (16 Jul 1874–17 Jan 1929), Find a Grave Memorial ID 136792685; Cremated, Ashes scattered; Maintained by Find a Grave.