Corp Samuel Sutherland Allen

Photo added by Russell Perkins

Corp Samuel Sutherland Allen

  • Birth 15 Aug 1835 Hardin County, Kentucky, USA
  • Death 3 Apr 1864 Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, USA
  • Burial Andersonville National Historic Site, Macon County, Georgia, USA
  • Plot 329
  • Memorial ID 13635640

SAMUEL SUTHERLAND ALLEN was born August 15, 1835 in Hardin County, Kentucky, and died April 03, 1864 in Andersonville, Georgia, during Civil War. He married SARAH ELIZABETH DEWITT January 13,1859 in Taylor County, Kentucky. He was 23, she 22 years of age. Consent given by Aaron Dewitt. Bondsman Jesse Morris. She was the daughter of AARON DEWITT and LUCINDA HASH. She was born December 03, 1836 in Taylor County, Kentucky, and died January 24, 1887 in Taylor County, Kentucky. She is buried in Hash Cemetery in #2, Taylor County, Kentucky.
Sam Allen was the second of 8 children. Little is known of his childhood, schooling, etc. His father, William J. Allen was the son of Elijah Allen b. abt 1770 and Elizabeth Scott. Elizabeth Scott was dau. of John Scott, b. 1741 and Judith Atkinson, b. 1741.
Sam married Sarah Elizabeth Dewitt on January 13, 1859. She was the daughter of Aaron H. Dewitt and Lucinda A. Hash. Consent was proven by John Thomas Oaks. The marriage was at Aaron Dewitt's by Rev. Solomon Skaggs. Witness: Elijah J. Allen & John T. Oaks.
On Nov 5, 1861, Sam enrolled in the U. S. Army for 3 years and was mustered in on Dec 30, 1861 at Camp Hobson, Near Greensburg, Kentucky by Captain S. M. Kellogg. He was assigned to Company F, 13th KY Infantry and attained the rank of Corporal. Some other men from his community that were connected to our family history and were in his company were: Joseph H. Arvin, Archibald Hash, Sylvester Price, Berry Whitlock, Richard Dewitt, Thomas Hash, James Hash, and James B. Allen.
At the time of his enlistment, Sarah was pregnant with Laura Ermine Allen who was born on February 4, 1862. On the 14th of February, the 13th left Greensburg and started on a line of march to the south. From Kentucky the 13th marched to Nashville after the fall of Donelson, and from there proceeded with Buell's army to Pittsburg Landing.
In the battle of Shiloh the 13th was in Crittenden's division, Boyles Brigade. Gen. Boyle's brigade consisted of the 13th and 9th Ky., 19th and 59th Ohio. He says, in his report, that he disembarked his four regiments at Pittsburg Landing the night of the 6th, and formed in rear of Gen. Nelson's line. Next morning at 5 O'clock, he formed on the right of Nelson. Marching steadily forward the enemy was encountered and heavy fighting began. He thus speaks of the 13th: "The 13th led by Col. Hobson in a gallant charge upon the enemy, drove them back with great slaughter, forcing them to desert their guns. In this charge Col. Hobson and Maj. Hobson, acting lieutenant-colonel, and Fowler, acting major, and acting adjt. Stewart, behaved with great coolness and courage, and with the exception of a recoil caused by a portion of Wisconsin troops breaking through their lines, creating some disorder, they steadily led their brave men forward, driving the enemy before them, Maj. Hobson had his horse shot from under him."
From the bloody field of Shiloh, the 13th marched with the army to Corinth, and after the Federal occupation of that place, marched with Buell's army by way of Iuka, Florence, Tuscumbia and Huntsville to Sequatchie Valley, during the summer of 1862.
When Bragg moved to Kentucky, the 13th accompanied Buell's army, and marched by way of Nashville, Bowling Green, Munfordville to Louisville, and out to Perryville. Being with Crittenden's Corps on that field it did not get into the engagement, but pursued Bragg out of the state. After the battle and Bragg retreated the 13th pursued his army to Wild Cat Mountain, near Livingston, KY, where they had a last engagement with him before he made his escape over the mountains into east Tennessee. The 13th returned to Kentucky and remained guarding railroad bridges and scouting until August 1863.
After Buell's retirement from Kentucky, the 13th was held in the state on duty at various points. It remained on guard duty in Kentucky through the winter and spring of 1863. During much of the summer of 1863, Sam Allen was sick at home and absent from duty.
The 13th was kept on duty in Kentucky at Munfordville and other places in the summer of 1863, until Gen. Burnside organized his force for the East Tennessee expedition. It was then placed in the 2nd Brigade of Gen Julius White's Division, and marched through the mountains of Kentucky to East Tennessee.
At Louden, the 13th was stationed to guard the crossings of the Tennessee River. When Longstreet advanced upon the place in overwhelming numbers, Col. Hobson was selected to cover the retreat of Burnside upon Knoxville. At Huff's Ferry he encountered Longstreet's advance, and heroically fought for several hours, losing 41 men, and staying the advance until the Union retreat was secure. For this exploit the colonel received the thanks of Gen. Burnside, and was regarded as the "hero of Huff's Ferry."
The engagement at Huff's Ferry was on the 14th of November, in which many of the men were killed and wounded, though the 13th was only engaged 10 or 15 minutes. The 13th retreated toward Knoxville, had quite a little battle at Lenoir Station and Campbell's Station during the retreat. They had a hard battle at Knoxville, November 29 and the city was surrounded by Longstreet, and the Regiment was under a state of siege for over a month.
On December 14, 1863, Corporal Sam Allen was captured by the rebels while "on the road to his regiment." He was taken to Belle Island, VA., a prisoner of war camp.
The Confederates lacked food and other necessities to care for the prisoners at Belle Island. In November 1863, Confederate Capt. W. Sidney Winder was sent to the village of Andersonville in Sumter County, in South-central Georgia, near the present day towns of Americus and Plains, to assess the potential of building a prison for captured Union Soldiers. The Deep South location, the availability of water, and its proximity to the Southwestern Railroad, made Andersonville a favorable prison location. The settlement of Andersonville, with the 1863 population of less than 20 persons, could not politically resist the building of such an unpopular facility. Andersonville thus became the site for a prison that was soon to become infamous in the North for prison conditions and the thousands of prisoners that would die there before war's end.
A prison for enlisted soldiers, it was designed to hold 10,000, but by August 1864, due to deteriorating resources and the breakdown of the prisoner exchange system, the prison population had swelled to over 32,000. This atrocious overcrowding quickly led to health and nutritional conditions that resulted in 12,912 deaths by war's end in May 1865. The prison guards, composed mostly of older men and boys, watched from sentry boxes (called "pigeon roosts" by the prisoners) perched atop the stockade and shot any prisoner who crossed a wooden railing, called the "deadline". The prison pen initially covered 16-1/2 acres, but was enlarged in June to 26-1/2 acres. A small, slow moving stream running through the middle of the stockade enclosure supplied water to most of the prison. Eight small earthen forts located around the exterior of the prison were equipped with artillery to put down disturbances and to defend against union cavalry attacks.
Available shelter was reduced to crude shelters, huts of scrap wood, tent fragments, or simple holes dug in the ground. Many had no shelter of any kind against the elements of rain, heat, and cold. No clothing was provided, and many prisoners were left with rags or nothing at all. The daily ration for the prisoners was the same as for the guards: one and one-fourth pound of corn meal and either one pound of beef or 1/3 pound of bacon. This sparse diet was only occasionally supplemented with beans, peas, rice, or molasses. The prisoners didn't even have sifters to sift the ground corn cobs from the corn meal.
Living in these unspeakably miserable conditions, almost 30 percent of the prisoners confined to Andersonville prison died at the camp during its 14-month existence. Diseases such as dysentery, gangrene, diarrhea, and scurvy took many. The Confederates lacked adequate facilities, personnel, and medical supplies to combat the diseases
Sam Allen was among the first prisoners to be transported to Andersonville Prison, arriving there on February 10, 1864, already in a weakened condition. On March 22, he was listed in the hospital. He died at Andersonville on April 3, 1864 of Chronic Diarrhea. He is buried in the National Cemetery there, Grave no. 329, along with nearly 13,000 others.

Sarah Caroline, Sam's sister said the day Samuel Allen died in the Civil War that a white dove with blood on its beak flew through an open window. This was passed down through the family.
The following is a letter written by Lt. W. J. Atkins who was in Company B of the 13th Kentucky Infantry Regt. He wrote it to the Sheriff of Adair County. This may give a clue to what happened to Sam Allen when he was captured:

Strawberry Plains
January 4, 1864
Sir
I have complied with your request. I have got all of the names of men from the age of 21 & over. I should have sent you this list before this, but I was cut off from my command. Didn't get thru to my Regt until 28th of December, run a narrow risk of being captured. Capt. B. N. Banks was captured with 53 others - I stood in the lines 4 days & nights. Had one meal in that time that I spent about 12 o'clock on Thursday night there was some others with me. I don't now whether
they got out or not they talked of given them selves up. The last time I talked with them. I found the boys all well. They are wanting clothing pretty bad. I don't think that half of them have a change & some of them no Blankets & shoes are bad. We are on half Rations & they haven't had any coffee or sugar for 6 weeks. The boys are sick of eastern Tennessee. We send out party's to forage every day. Potatoes are worth $2.50 apples $5.00 Brandy $5.00 per canteen. I will close write to me soon.
I remain your friend
W. J. Atkins

From the Compendium of the War of the Rebellion:
Losses: Tennessee
Dec 14 - Bean's Station; 16 Killed and mortally wounded, 51 wounded, 48 captured and missing
Dec 22 – Cleveland; 1 Killed and Mortally wounded, 6 captured and missing.
Dec 24-28 - Operations about Dandridge and Mossy Creek; 20 Killed, 88 wounded, 19 captured & missing.

Bean's Station is near Clinch Mountain where records say Sam Allen was captured. I believe he could be one of the 48 captured here even though the 13th Kentucky Infantry was not engaged here, they were in the area and Sam was "Captured while on road to regiment." Kentucky 11th and 27th Infantry were involved in the Bean's Station engagement.
When the active service was over in East Tennessee, the 13th remained in camp until the opening of the spring of 1864. It then marched to Chattanooga and in May united with Gen. Sherman's army in the Atlanta campaign. It was then in the 1st Brigade, of Hascall's division, 23rd Army Corps, Gen. Schofield. Until June the regiment was under the command of Col. W. E. Hobson, when he was placed in command of the brigade and the regiment was led by Lieut. Col. Estes. It bore a gallant part in this great campaign, being at Resaca, Dallas, Cassville, Allatoona, Kennesaw, and all the battles around Atlanta, going on the grand movement south of the city to Jonesboro and Lovejoy.
The following extract from the published account already used, shows the movements of the 13th and the brigade to which it belonged:
"In all the battles of Sherman's Georgia campaign, from Buzzard's Roost and Resaca, Col. Hobson took a conspicuous part, and brought his command to a high state of perfection in drill and discipline. Near Kennesaw he was put in command of the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Division, which position he now occupies. Nobly has this brigade and its commander borne their parts through the June and July battles. It is indeed a proud privilege to write in reference to the noble Kentucky regiments now before Atlanta, and we shall endeavor to resume our narrative when we have collected the facts. All have distinguished themselves on every battlefield. They are Kentucky names, and we love to repeat them; they are heroes and we are proud of them; they are patriots and we honor them."
After the fall of Atlanta, the 13th was ordered to Kentucky. It went on duty at Bowling Green and Col. Hobson commanded the post. It so continued until in January 1865, when it was ordered to Louisville and was mustered out of service, January 12, 1865.
The following extract from a letter written by Gen. Julius White after the war, shows his estimate of this excellent and faithful regiment:
"I have commanded during the war some sixty regiments of infantry. and among them all there was not one better, if as good, as the 13th Ky. Not only was that regiment wholly reliable during an engagement (for they were always as brave as the bravest), but in camp, on the march, on all occasions and everywhere, that regiment could be depended upon for the prompt performance of every duty. The country owes the 13th Ky. a heavy debt of gratitude for its lofty patriotism and unyielding courage and endurance."
Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 50 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 Officers and 181 Enlisted men by disease. Total 245.
When Samuel S. Allen did not return from the Civil War, Sarah married William Robert Hash in 1866.
The Children of SAMUEL ALLEN and SARAH DEWITT are:
(1) MILTON DAVID ALLEN, b. June 24, 1860; d. February 24, 1937, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery)(His headstone has '1861-1937'); m. LAURA ANN BUCHANAN; b. 1865, Taylor County, Kentucky (Also have seen her birthday as 1855); d. 1918, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery.
(2) LAURA ERMINE ALLEN, b. February 04, 1862, Taylor County, Kentucky; d. October 14, 1924, LaRue County, Kentucky. She is buried in Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery; m. (1) FRANKLIN D. JONES, December 12, 1877, LaRue County, Kentucky. He 21 and she was 16 years of age; b. 1856, Taylor County, KY; d. (May have died about 1880-1881); m. (2) JOHN CHARLES (CHARNER) HUBER, March 02, 1882, Taylor County, Kentucky. Second marriage for both. He 30, she 20 yrs old. By Elder S. Underwood at G. H. Childers. Wit: G. H. Childers, Wm. Huber; b. November 25, 1850, Taylor County, Kentucky; d. April 25, 1931, Taylor County, Kentucky. He is buried in Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery.
In the 1870 LaRue County Census, Otter Creek District, Laura and her brother, Milton, were living with their grandparents. William and Elizabeth Allen, Family #133. Their mother, Sarah, has remarried to W. R. Hash and has 3 small children by him by this time.

Before Marrying John Charles Huber, Laura Allen had been previously married to Franklin Jones. They
had one child, named Jennie Jones.
Laura was the daughter of Samuel S. Allen and Sarah Elizabeth Dewitt. After Samuel S. Allen did not return from the Civil War, Sarah married W. R. Hash. The children and descendants of this marriage are all related to me. That would include all the Hash's of the area. The relationship and listing of these descendants of Sarah and W. R. Hash are covered more extensively in my book, "The Otter Creek Separate Baptist Church Cemetery, The People Buried There and Their Relatives."



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  • Maintained by: Russell Perkins
  • Originally Created by: Bev
  • Added: 16 Mar 2006
  • Find A Grave Memorial 13635640
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Corp Samuel Sutherland Allen (15 Aug 1835–3 Apr 1864), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13635640, citing Andersonville National Cemetery, Andersonville National Historic Site, Macon County, Georgia, USA ; Maintained by Russell Perkins (contributor 47213352) .