Ward Allison Dorrance

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Ward Allison Dorrance

Birth
Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, USA
Death
16 Sep 1996 (aged 92)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA
Burial
Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Plot
Row K, Plot 35a
Memorial ID
View Source
Lt. U.S. Coast Guard, World War II

Ward Allison Dorrance (1904-) was a writer and teacher of Jefferson City, Mo., and Washington, D.C. He taught at the University of Missouri, 1926-1953, and Georgetown University, 1958-1974.

Ward's parents were Claudia Chapel Richardson and Randolph Millard Dorrance.

Claudia was the sixth child born to Susan Elizabeth Allison and Joseph Marion Richardson. She was born on April 26, 1884, in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Randolph was the first child born to Elmedia Bradley and Isaac R. Dorrance. He was born on September 8, 1876, in Elk Fork Township, Pettis County, Missouri.

Ward's sister was Mildred Eloise; and his brother was Jack Courtney.

Ward went to the University of Missouri and majored in French and English. While he did graduate work, he taught freshman French classes and flunked his brother in class.

He was on leave of absence from the University of Missouri and at the Sorbonne to take his doctor's degree when his mother died on November 2, 1930. He destroyed his writings in France and returned to the United States on December 19, 1930, on the passenger ship, Lafayette.

Ward taught French and English at the University of Missouri from 1926 to 1953 except for his studies in France and his service during World II.

His military record listed him as Commander Greenland Patrol, Argentia, Newfoundland; United States Coast Guard from September 28, 1942, to April 16, 1946; American and Victory Ribbons, Europe Theatre Ribbon; and his rank/grade, Lieutenant.

Ward withdrew from the University faculty in 1953; lived in England; moved to Alexandria, Virginia; later moved to Washington, D.C.; and in 1958 joined the English department of Georgetown University, Washington, D. C., from which he retired in 1974.

According to his letters, he taught at William and Mary, Cambridge, and Oxford as a visiting professor between 1953 and 1958. His travels overseas were documented on passenger lists.

Ward's writings were included in the Southern Historical Collection, Manuscripts Department, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Papers 1935-1974; Missouri's Literary Heritage, Central Missouri; Biography & Genealogy Master Index (BGMI); Best Shorts Stories for 1949 and 1957; TIME, Book Notes on The Sundowners, 1942; essays and short stories published in the Sewanne Review and Hudson Review; John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation 1940 Fellow; and the Missouri State Capitol.

His writings included: The Survival of French in the Old District of Sainte Genevieve; Three Ozark Streams; We're From Missouri; Where the Rivers Meet; The White Hound, Stories; The man about the house; a novella; Mrs. Purefoy; and The Sundowners.

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Dorrance may have been in residence at the Sorbonne doing research and writing when his mother died, but he did not actually take his PhD degree there. He received his PhD from the University of Missouri in 1935. The year that his PhD was conferred by the University of Missouri (and the year that is stamped on his dissertation) is 1935. His dissertation is housed in the University of Missouri libraries. It is entitled: The survival of French in the old district of Sainte Genevieve. I believe his dissertation was later published as a separate paper/book--and these I also found in the University of Missouri library catalog. I can't help but wonder of Dr. Dorrance helped perpetuate the idea that he received his doctorate from the Sorbonne, as that is what is written in his bio related to receipt of his Guggenheim award. He was a serious Francophile, and in later life really turned his back on the University of Missouri and Missouri in general. I live in Columbia MO and have been researching Dr. Dorrance in relation to his ownership of Confederate Hill and his family history, so am writing about this with some authority.

Contributor: P.S. Cooper, Member #51328811
Lt. U.S. Coast Guard, World War II

Ward Allison Dorrance (1904-) was a writer and teacher of Jefferson City, Mo., and Washington, D.C. He taught at the University of Missouri, 1926-1953, and Georgetown University, 1958-1974.

Ward's parents were Claudia Chapel Richardson and Randolph Millard Dorrance.

Claudia was the sixth child born to Susan Elizabeth Allison and Joseph Marion Richardson. She was born on April 26, 1884, in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Randolph was the first child born to Elmedia Bradley and Isaac R. Dorrance. He was born on September 8, 1876, in Elk Fork Township, Pettis County, Missouri.

Ward's sister was Mildred Eloise; and his brother was Jack Courtney.

Ward went to the University of Missouri and majored in French and English. While he did graduate work, he taught freshman French classes and flunked his brother in class.

He was on leave of absence from the University of Missouri and at the Sorbonne to take his doctor's degree when his mother died on November 2, 1930. He destroyed his writings in France and returned to the United States on December 19, 1930, on the passenger ship, Lafayette.

Ward taught French and English at the University of Missouri from 1926 to 1953 except for his studies in France and his service during World II.

His military record listed him as Commander Greenland Patrol, Argentia, Newfoundland; United States Coast Guard from September 28, 1942, to April 16, 1946; American and Victory Ribbons, Europe Theatre Ribbon; and his rank/grade, Lieutenant.

Ward withdrew from the University faculty in 1953; lived in England; moved to Alexandria, Virginia; later moved to Washington, D.C.; and in 1958 joined the English department of Georgetown University, Washington, D. C., from which he retired in 1974.

According to his letters, he taught at William and Mary, Cambridge, and Oxford as a visiting professor between 1953 and 1958. His travels overseas were documented on passenger lists.

Ward's writings were included in the Southern Historical Collection, Manuscripts Department, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Papers 1935-1974; Missouri's Literary Heritage, Central Missouri; Biography & Genealogy Master Index (BGMI); Best Shorts Stories for 1949 and 1957; TIME, Book Notes on The Sundowners, 1942; essays and short stories published in the Sewanne Review and Hudson Review; John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation 1940 Fellow; and the Missouri State Capitol.

His writings included: The Survival of French in the Old District of Sainte Genevieve; Three Ozark Streams; We're From Missouri; Where the Rivers Meet; The White Hound, Stories; The man about the house; a novella; Mrs. Purefoy; and The Sundowners.

**************************
Dorrance may have been in residence at the Sorbonne doing research and writing when his mother died, but he did not actually take his PhD degree there. He received his PhD from the University of Missouri in 1935. The year that his PhD was conferred by the University of Missouri (and the year that is stamped on his dissertation) is 1935. His dissertation is housed in the University of Missouri libraries. It is entitled: The survival of French in the old district of Sainte Genevieve. I believe his dissertation was later published as a separate paper/book--and these I also found in the University of Missouri library catalog. I can't help but wonder of Dr. Dorrance helped perpetuate the idea that he received his doctorate from the Sorbonne, as that is what is written in his bio related to receipt of his Guggenheim award. He was a serious Francophile, and in later life really turned his back on the University of Missouri and Missouri in general. I live in Columbia MO and have been researching Dr. Dorrance in relation to his ownership of Confederate Hill and his family history, so am writing about this with some authority.

Contributor: P.S. Cooper, Member #51328811

Inscription

"Grandson"
Buried in same plot as Joseph Marion Richardson.