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Lee Carrington Bradley

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Lee Carrington Bradley

Birth
Death
31 May 1942 (aged 70)
Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, USA
Burial
Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, USA Add to Map
Plot
Block 16
Memorial ID
View Source

The mansion was built for Lee Carrington Bradley, who was a prominent lawyer in the city. Lee was born in Birmingham in 1871 to Richard Carrington and Sarah Gurley Bradley, who were members of a pioneer Alabama family. 

In 1890, Lee graduated from what is now known as Birmingham Southern College and began practicing law in Birmingham. Appointed Jefferson County solicitor in 1896, he was already a lynchpin of the community, aged just 25 years.

In 1896, Lee married Eleanor Lyons. Their first child was born the following year and named after his father, Lee Carrington Bradley, Jr. A second child followed in 1899, named Thomas Lyons Bradley.

Sadly, Thomas's life was cut short at the age of just 21 years. While home from college, he suffered a fatal accident at the kitchen table, according to Leland Kent. Following the tragedy, his mother reportedly always set a place for her lost son at the dining table until she passed away in 1967.

Lee's star continued to rise as he set up his own law firm of Tillman, Grubb, Bradley & Morrow in 1904, according to Leland Kent.

Word spread beyond Alabama of Lee's success as a lawyer. Eventually reaching President Woodrow Wilson, who appointed him supervising attorney for the United States Alien Property Custodian department.

He's pictured here in 1918 (third from the left) with his colleagues. The purpose of the department was to confiscate and hold assets of enemies of the USA during the First World War.

Lee made his mark in his new president-appointed high-profile role by suggesting legislation to enable his department to sell or dispose of perishable property, which would otherwise languish in warehouses, says Abandoned Southeast

Returning home from the bright lights of the political capital, Lee resumed his law practice. He was appointed as receiver for the failing Birmingham Railway, Light & Power Company, which he successfully transformed into the more robust Birmingham Electric Company.

Lee's professional life was far from quiet – the mover and shaker served as the director of Birmingham Savings Bank & Trust Company for 40 years and was a stockholder in Birmingham's baseball club.

When Lee passed away in 1942, his funeral was held at the house. He was buried in Elmwood Cemetery along with the rest of the Bradley family.

The mansion was built for Lee Carrington Bradley, who was a prominent lawyer in the city. Lee was born in Birmingham in 1871 to Richard Carrington and Sarah Gurley Bradley, who were members of a pioneer Alabama family. 

In 1890, Lee graduated from what is now known as Birmingham Southern College and began practicing law in Birmingham. Appointed Jefferson County solicitor in 1896, he was already a lynchpin of the community, aged just 25 years.

In 1896, Lee married Eleanor Lyons. Their first child was born the following year and named after his father, Lee Carrington Bradley, Jr. A second child followed in 1899, named Thomas Lyons Bradley.

Sadly, Thomas's life was cut short at the age of just 21 years. While home from college, he suffered a fatal accident at the kitchen table, according to Leland Kent. Following the tragedy, his mother reportedly always set a place for her lost son at the dining table until she passed away in 1967.

Lee's star continued to rise as he set up his own law firm of Tillman, Grubb, Bradley & Morrow in 1904, according to Leland Kent.

Word spread beyond Alabama of Lee's success as a lawyer. Eventually reaching President Woodrow Wilson, who appointed him supervising attorney for the United States Alien Property Custodian department.

He's pictured here in 1918 (third from the left) with his colleagues. The purpose of the department was to confiscate and hold assets of enemies of the USA during the First World War.

Lee made his mark in his new president-appointed high-profile role by suggesting legislation to enable his department to sell or dispose of perishable property, which would otherwise languish in warehouses, says Abandoned Southeast

Returning home from the bright lights of the political capital, Lee resumed his law practice. He was appointed as receiver for the failing Birmingham Railway, Light & Power Company, which he successfully transformed into the more robust Birmingham Electric Company.

Lee's professional life was far from quiet – the mover and shaker served as the director of Birmingham Savings Bank & Trust Company for 40 years and was a stockholder in Birmingham's baseball club.

When Lee passed away in 1942, his funeral was held at the house. He was buried in Elmwood Cemetery along with the rest of the Bradley family.



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