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 Joyce Margaret LePage

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Joyce Margaret LePage

Birth
Benton County, Washington, USA
Death
22 Jul 1971 (aged 21)
Pullman, Whitman County, Washington, USA
Burial
Richland, Benton County, Washington, USA
Memorial ID
134664724 View Source

Joyce LePage, 21, was last seen on July 22, 1971, on the campus of Washington State University, where she was an undergraduate. Nine months later, her skeletal remains were found wrapped in carpeting and military blankets, bound with rope, in a deep ravine south of Pullman, Washington. Multiple suspects—including Bundy—have "never been cleared", according to investigators.[378] Joyce Margaret LePage was born Dec. 4, 1949, into a farming family that lived just outside the city.
As an athletic and intelligent student, her decision to attend Washington State University was not a surprise to the LePage family. But Joyce would not graduate. In fact, Joyce would never grow beyond the age of 21 years old.
In the summer of 1971, the WSU junior disappeared without a trace.
Nine months after her disappearance, her remains were found April 16, 1972, in a gully roughly 10-15 miles south of Pullman, west of Colton just off Wawawai Road in remote Wawawai Canyon.
Her mostly skeletal remains were wrapped inside a military blanket and green carpet. The green carpet had gone missing roughly 10 days before she was reported missing from the university's Stevens Hall, which was under construction at the time she disappeared.
Joyce was known to hang out on the first floor of the vacant dormitory, where she would study, play piano and relax from the stress of taking extra classes during the summer term.
An extensive cold-case file shows the Whitman County Sheriff's Office reported she was most likely killed when WSU police first investigated the missing carpet.
"Joyce was someone's daughter, sister, and friend. She was a person, For the LePage family, they mourned. There are still families who miss and love her." She was the second out of five children. Joyce was the second after her sister, Phyllis LePage. She had three younger brothers — Bruce, Steven, and David. Joyce, and her brothers and sisters, grew up on the family farm on LaPorte Drive.
As a child, Joyce would often pester her brothers and leave them scattered notes when they were too noisy or bothersome.
The family reported her missing after she didn't come home for a weekend visit in Pasco.
"We have a theft case and a missing person case, but it was not until April of 1972 that we discovered that her body was deliberately put somewhere in the carpet," he said.
The Whitman County Sheriff's Office reported her remains were sent to the FBI for examination. The FBI discovered seven possible knife markings on her ribs that they reported being the cause of death. However, after nine months in a gully of Wawawai Canyon, animals and scavengers had consumed part of Joyce's decomposed remains. "A unique set of hurdles have been placed for this case," Myers said. "She wasn't reported missing for 10 days and DNA testing didn't really hit the scene for another 20 years.
"Most of the material and resources are well over 50 years old. The timeline factors in, too. "Between her going missing and her officially being declared a murder victim, a lot of information we need is missing."
There have been numerous suspects and persons of interest throughout the years. However, any of those individuals would be well into their elderly age or have died. One person of interest — a convicted serial killer in particular — died in 1989. Ted Bundy — who confessed to 30 murders and was confirmed in 20 — was a person of interest in the disappearances of Joyce LePage and Laure Patridge, of Spokane. Bundy, however, never confessed to Joyce's murder. And he denied responsibility for Joyce's death before his execution in 1989 in Florida's "Old Sparky" electric chair.
"We have to broaden it (the case) out and take all the possibilities. Ted Bundy is one of them," Bruce LePage said. "But sometimes you get too broad and get distracted and the probability goes out. We can just hope for an opening in the case in some way."
In the last few years, Bruce has placed a reward for anyone who can provide information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for Joyce's death. The reward is $100,000 — $40,000 for information that leads to an arrest, with an additional $60,000 if that leads to a conviction. "I will remain involved and keep the reward up for $100,000 for as long as I am alive," Bruce said.
Anyone with information on Joyce LePage's disappearance and homicide should contact the Whitman County Sheriff's Office at (509) 397-6266.

Joyce LePage, 21, was last seen on July 22, 1971, on the campus of Washington State University, where she was an undergraduate. Nine months later, her skeletal remains were found wrapped in carpeting and military blankets, bound with rope, in a deep ravine south of Pullman, Washington. Multiple suspects—including Bundy—have "never been cleared", according to investigators.[378] Joyce Margaret LePage was born Dec. 4, 1949, into a farming family that lived just outside the city.
As an athletic and intelligent student, her decision to attend Washington State University was not a surprise to the LePage family. But Joyce would not graduate. In fact, Joyce would never grow beyond the age of 21 years old.
In the summer of 1971, the WSU junior disappeared without a trace.
Nine months after her disappearance, her remains were found April 16, 1972, in a gully roughly 10-15 miles south of Pullman, west of Colton just off Wawawai Road in remote Wawawai Canyon.
Her mostly skeletal remains were wrapped inside a military blanket and green carpet. The green carpet had gone missing roughly 10 days before she was reported missing from the university's Stevens Hall, which was under construction at the time she disappeared.
Joyce was known to hang out on the first floor of the vacant dormitory, where she would study, play piano and relax from the stress of taking extra classes during the summer term.
An extensive cold-case file shows the Whitman County Sheriff's Office reported she was most likely killed when WSU police first investigated the missing carpet.
"Joyce was someone's daughter, sister, and friend. She was a person, For the LePage family, they mourned. There are still families who miss and love her." She was the second out of five children. Joyce was the second after her sister, Phyllis LePage. She had three younger brothers — Bruce, Steven, and David. Joyce, and her brothers and sisters, grew up on the family farm on LaPorte Drive.
As a child, Joyce would often pester her brothers and leave them scattered notes when they were too noisy or bothersome.
The family reported her missing after she didn't come home for a weekend visit in Pasco.
"We have a theft case and a missing person case, but it was not until April of 1972 that we discovered that her body was deliberately put somewhere in the carpet," he said.
The Whitman County Sheriff's Office reported her remains were sent to the FBI for examination. The FBI discovered seven possible knife markings on her ribs that they reported being the cause of death. However, after nine months in a gully of Wawawai Canyon, animals and scavengers had consumed part of Joyce's decomposed remains. "A unique set of hurdles have been placed for this case," Myers said. "She wasn't reported missing for 10 days and DNA testing didn't really hit the scene for another 20 years.
"Most of the material and resources are well over 50 years old. The timeline factors in, too. "Between her going missing and her officially being declared a murder victim, a lot of information we need is missing."
There have been numerous suspects and persons of interest throughout the years. However, any of those individuals would be well into their elderly age or have died. One person of interest — a convicted serial killer in particular — died in 1989. Ted Bundy — who confessed to 30 murders and was confirmed in 20 — was a person of interest in the disappearances of Joyce LePage and Laure Patridge, of Spokane. Bundy, however, never confessed to Joyce's murder. And he denied responsibility for Joyce's death before his execution in 1989 in Florida's "Old Sparky" electric chair.
"We have to broaden it (the case) out and take all the possibilities. Ted Bundy is one of them," Bruce LePage said. "But sometimes you get too broad and get distracted and the probability goes out. We can just hope for an opening in the case in some way."
In the last few years, Bruce has placed a reward for anyone who can provide information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for Joyce's death. The reward is $100,000 — $40,000 for information that leads to an arrest, with an additional $60,000 if that leads to a conviction. "I will remain involved and keep the reward up for $100,000 for as long as I am alive," Bruce said.
Anyone with information on Joyce LePage's disappearance and homicide should contact the Whitman County Sheriff's Office at (509) 397-6266.


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