Covington “Covami” Hall

Covington “Covami” Hall

Birth
Woodville, Wilkinson County, Mississippi, USA
Death 21 Feb 1952 (aged 80)
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA
Burial New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA
Memorial ID 134587502 · View Source
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William Covington Hall (he never used his first name) was a poet, editor, and radical labor organizer. He was the author of several books, including "Labor Struggles in the Deep South" (2000), a posthumous collection available from the IWW (Industrial Workers of the World) Literature Department.

A biography published in his book of poems "Battle Hymns of Toil" (Oklahoma City, 1946) reads as follows.

Covington Hall, widely known under his pen name of "Covami",was born in Woodville, Mississippi, Friday, August 25, 1871. His father was Rev. William A. Hall, a Presbyterian minister and educator. His mother was Mary Elizabeth Pierce, youngest daughter of Phoebe Ould Fuqua Pierce of Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. His father and mother were separated early in life and he was, with his brothers and sisters, reared by his half-uncle, Dr. A. V. Woods, whom the children called "Uncle Ami."

He says, "I was born in the midst of tumults and riots and, if I live a few years or months longer, I expect to die in the midst of tumults and riots". To this early experience he attributes his lifelong rebellion against things as they are, especially in the Land of Dixie, which he holds to be the First Conquered Province of the American Plutocratic Empire. "I have", he says, "seen the collapse and downfall of two great social systems, Southern Feudalism and, now, of Capitalism; and I see no hope for a free and democratic Republic and World other than in a Cooperative Democracy, a Confederation of the World based on the Jeffersonian principle of 'Equal rights and opportunities to ALL and special privileges to NONE.'"

For more than forty years he has been active as a writer, speaker and publicity agent in many fights made by the Workers and Farmers for economic freedom. He has fought with them in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, North Dakota, South Dakota, Florida, and all over Dixie. He began this activity as a follower of William J. Bryan. He has taken an active part in many strenuous political campaigns, such as the Farmers'Non-partisan League of North Dakota, where, in 1920 and 1921, he acted as one of the publicity chiefs for the League under Governor Frazier and his Attorney General, now Congressman William Lemke.

In addition to this, he was Adjutant (Secretary) of Camp Beauregard, United Sons of Confederated Veterans, during the Reunion of 1903, a Captain on the Staff of General John B.Gordon, and, after the Reunion, was conscripted by Commander Fassouyx to be his Adjutant General for the Sons for the term of 1903-4.

He has written thousands of poems in defense of and to stir up the Farmers and Workers everywhere. These poems have gone all over the English speaking world and many have been translated into other tongues. Always, even when they were merely propaganda verse, the purpose has been to call the Workers and Farmers to battle for the Brotherhood for which the Rebel Carpenter of Nazareth fought and died.


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  • Created by: wayne
  • Added: 19 Aug 2014
  • Find A Grave Memorial 134587502
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Covington “Covami” Hall (25 Aug 1871–21 Feb 1952), Find A Grave Memorial no. 134587502, citing Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA ; Maintained by wayne (contributor 46954396) .