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Stephen Bogue

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Stephen Bogue

Birth
North Carolina, USA
Death
11 Oct 1868 (aged 77)
Vandalia, Cass County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Penn, Cass County, Michigan, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Stephen father was Joseph and Mary (Newby) Bogue of Perquimans County, North Carolina and was the youngest of fifteen children. His grandfather Josiah Bogue was a Scotchman that sail to America and settled in Edenton, North Carolina.

He was a devoted member of the Society of Friends, and he was instrumental in effecting the Birch Lake Monthly Meetings. He was one of the original members and had the first meeting at his house.

** below Bio Provided by Kent Gebhard

The Underground Railroad and the Kentucky Raid in Cass County, MI.

In Cass County, the houses of Ishmael Lee, Stephen Bogue, Zachariah Shugart and
Josiah Osborn (all Quakers), were stations of much importance. W. S. Elliott,
conductor, brought fugitive slaves through to these men from L. P. Alexander,
agent at Niles, and they were sent onward toward Canada by way of Flowerfield,
in St. Joseph County, and Schoolcraft, in Kalamazoo County. William Wheeler was
the agent at the former, and Dr. Nathan M. Thomas at the latter station. William
Jones, of Calvin, known as "Nigger Bill," and Wright Modlin, of Williamsville,
were famous "nigger runners," and made frequent trips to the Ohio River, and
sometimes to Kentucky soil, for the purpose of assisting and guiding fugitives
to freedom. The number of runaway slaves who passed through Cass County, prior
to 1848, and who were given aid in one way or another by the Abolitionists, was
probably not less than fifteen hundred. Dr. Thomas, of Schoolcraft, estimated
that he had assisted at least a thousand upon their way, and he by no means
received all who journeyed through this county.

In February, 1848, the Kentuckians brought suit to recover the value of their
slaves, in the United States Circuit Court, at Detroit. The defendants were D.
T. Nicholson, Stephen Bogue, Josiah Osborn, Ishmael Lee, Zachariah Shugart,
Jefferson Osborn, William Jones and Ebenezer McIlvain, Abner Pratt, of Marshall,
and Francis Trautman (the Kentuckian who acted as leader in the Calhoun County
raid) appeared in behalf of the plaintiffs, and Jacob M. Howard, of Detroit
(afterward United States Senator) James L. Jerneygan, of South Bend, Ind., and
Ezekiel S. Smith, were the attorneys for defendants, the last named being the
attorney of record.

The case was continued several times, and finally came to trial in the latter
part of 1850. In January, 1851, it was concluded, the jury disagreeing. The
principal witness for the prosecution, Jonathan Cruise, of South Bend, was
arrested on the charge of perjury as soon as he left the stand, and the jury
before which he was tried, stood nine to three for his conviction.

At the disagreement of the jury, D. T. Nicholson paid the sum of $1,000 to clear
himself and Ishmael Lee. This virtually settled the cause of the Kentucky slave
owners against the Michigan Abolitionists. The total costs of the case, which
amounted to about $3,000, were borne by the several defendants, Nicholson
included. The number of witnesses subpoenaed by both sides was somewhere from
forty to fifty, and many depositions were taken, especially by the plaintiffs.
The witnesses for the defense charged, as a rule, only the amount of their
actual expenses. Had they received the legal fees, the costs of the suit would
have been much larger.

The sum of $1,000 paid by Mr. Nicholson, was according to rumor, appropriated by
Abner Pratt, Esq., as his fee in the case, and the slave owners never received
any portion of it. And so ended, as far as the Cass County people were
immediately interested, this "celebrated ease." The Kentucky raid, however, had
other effects than those locally observable. With the Van Zant case in Ohio, it
had a strong bearing upon the passage of the fugitive slave law of 1850, which,
in turn, brought slavery into a more pronounced position as a political issue,
and powerfully influenced in one way or another all subsequent legislation upon
the "peculiar institution."

From:
History of Cass County, Michigan
With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches
of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.
Waterman, Watkins & Co., Chicago 1882.

Thanks,

Kent Gebhard**
Stephen father was Joseph and Mary (Newby) Bogue of Perquimans County, North Carolina and was the youngest of fifteen children. His grandfather Josiah Bogue was a Scotchman that sail to America and settled in Edenton, North Carolina.

He was a devoted member of the Society of Friends, and he was instrumental in effecting the Birch Lake Monthly Meetings. He was one of the original members and had the first meeting at his house.

** below Bio Provided by Kent Gebhard

The Underground Railroad and the Kentucky Raid in Cass County, MI.

In Cass County, the houses of Ishmael Lee, Stephen Bogue, Zachariah Shugart and
Josiah Osborn (all Quakers), were stations of much importance. W. S. Elliott,
conductor, brought fugitive slaves through to these men from L. P. Alexander,
agent at Niles, and they were sent onward toward Canada by way of Flowerfield,
in St. Joseph County, and Schoolcraft, in Kalamazoo County. William Wheeler was
the agent at the former, and Dr. Nathan M. Thomas at the latter station. William
Jones, of Calvin, known as "Nigger Bill," and Wright Modlin, of Williamsville,
were famous "nigger runners," and made frequent trips to the Ohio River, and
sometimes to Kentucky soil, for the purpose of assisting and guiding fugitives
to freedom. The number of runaway slaves who passed through Cass County, prior
to 1848, and who were given aid in one way or another by the Abolitionists, was
probably not less than fifteen hundred. Dr. Thomas, of Schoolcraft, estimated
that he had assisted at least a thousand upon their way, and he by no means
received all who journeyed through this county.

In February, 1848, the Kentuckians brought suit to recover the value of their
slaves, in the United States Circuit Court, at Detroit. The defendants were D.
T. Nicholson, Stephen Bogue, Josiah Osborn, Ishmael Lee, Zachariah Shugart,
Jefferson Osborn, William Jones and Ebenezer McIlvain, Abner Pratt, of Marshall,
and Francis Trautman (the Kentuckian who acted as leader in the Calhoun County
raid) appeared in behalf of the plaintiffs, and Jacob M. Howard, of Detroit
(afterward United States Senator) James L. Jerneygan, of South Bend, Ind., and
Ezekiel S. Smith, were the attorneys for defendants, the last named being the
attorney of record.

The case was continued several times, and finally came to trial in the latter
part of 1850. In January, 1851, it was concluded, the jury disagreeing. The
principal witness for the prosecution, Jonathan Cruise, of South Bend, was
arrested on the charge of perjury as soon as he left the stand, and the jury
before which he was tried, stood nine to three for his conviction.

At the disagreement of the jury, D. T. Nicholson paid the sum of $1,000 to clear
himself and Ishmael Lee. This virtually settled the cause of the Kentucky slave
owners against the Michigan Abolitionists. The total costs of the case, which
amounted to about $3,000, were borne by the several defendants, Nicholson
included. The number of witnesses subpoenaed by both sides was somewhere from
forty to fifty, and many depositions were taken, especially by the plaintiffs.
The witnesses for the defense charged, as a rule, only the amount of their
actual expenses. Had they received the legal fees, the costs of the suit would
have been much larger.

The sum of $1,000 paid by Mr. Nicholson, was according to rumor, appropriated by
Abner Pratt, Esq., as his fee in the case, and the slave owners never received
any portion of it. And so ended, as far as the Cass County people were
immediately interested, this "celebrated ease." The Kentucky raid, however, had
other effects than those locally observable. With the Van Zant case in Ohio, it
had a strong bearing upon the passage of the fugitive slave law of 1850, which,
in turn, brought slavery into a more pronounced position as a political issue,
and powerfully influenced in one way or another all subsequent legislation upon
the "peculiar institution."

From:
History of Cass County, Michigan
With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches
of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.
Waterman, Watkins & Co., Chicago 1882.

Thanks,

Kent Gebhard**


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