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Pvt William W. Coulter

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Pvt William W. Coulter

Birth
Winston County, Mississippi, USA
Death
17 Jun 1862 (aged 19–20)
Richmond City, Virginia, USA
Burial
Richmond, Richmond City, Virginia, USA
Plot
Sec. B, Row O, Grave 66
Memorial ID
128944045 View Source

Enlisted: Ensign to Musician, Co. A, 13th Mississippi Infantry. When: May 16, 1861; Where: Corinth, MS.. Period 1 year. Travel to enlist 142 miles. Company Muster Rolls: May & June 1861 present. Sept. to Dec. 1861 present. Remarks: Muster into band. Jan. & Feb. 1862 present. Chimborazo Hospital No. 1, Richmond, VA.. Admitted: June 13, 1862. Died: June 17, 1862 from Typhoid Fever. Description: Born Winston Co., MS.. Age 19 years, height 5 feet 11 inches, Dark complexion, Hazel eyes, Dark hair, Occupation Musician & Dance Teacher. Engagements: 1st Manassas, Leesburg, Va.. His father John Coulter filed claims and received $117.80.

In 1866 the Women of Oakwood raised money to put wooden whitewash headboards on the graves that they could read. This was unheard of since the south was still recovering from the war. But they did it. In 1876 the headboards were rotting away they removed them because they became unsightly. The graves laid unmarked until 1900 when they put the marble headstones with numbers on them you see today. As of today no one knows how many soldiers are buried there. The picture was taken in April 5-8 1865 by Mathew Brady after the city fell on April 3, 1865.

Enlisted: Ensign to Musician, Co. A, 13th Mississippi Infantry. When: May 16, 1861; Where: Corinth, MS.. Period 1 year. Travel to enlist 142 miles. Company Muster Rolls: May & June 1861 present. Sept. to Dec. 1861 present. Remarks: Muster into band. Jan. & Feb. 1862 present. Chimborazo Hospital No. 1, Richmond, VA.. Admitted: June 13, 1862. Died: June 17, 1862 from Typhoid Fever. Description: Born Winston Co., MS.. Age 19 years, height 5 feet 11 inches, Dark complexion, Hazel eyes, Dark hair, Occupation Musician & Dance Teacher. Engagements: 1st Manassas, Leesburg, Va.. His father John Coulter filed claims and received $117.80.

In 1866 the Women of Oakwood raised money to put wooden whitewash headboards on the graves that they could read. This was unheard of since the south was still recovering from the war. But they did it. In 1876 the headboards were rotting away they removed them because they became unsightly. The graves laid unmarked until 1900 when they put the marble headstones with numbers on them you see today. As of today no one knows how many soldiers are buried there. The picture was taken in April 5-8 1865 by Mathew Brady after the city fell on April 3, 1865.


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