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Leo B Brady

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Leo B Brady Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA
Death
18 Nov 1984 (aged 67)
Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA
Burial
Cheltenham, Prince George's County, Maryland, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section A C4 Row 4 Site 7
Memorial ID
View Source
Writer. He was an American writer and theater artist who also achieved great success as a professor of young playwrights. He was the author of four novels, a half-dozen plays and several adaptations of plays and novels that were produced on stage and on television. After writing some well-received plays as an undergrad at Catholic University in Washington, District of Columbia, he published a play version of Richard Connell's short story "Brother Orchid," which became a staple of the Samuel French catalog and inspired Hollywood to adapt the story for a film starring Edward G. Robinson. (He received no credit.) In collaboration with Walter Kerr, he wrote "Yankee Doodle Boy," a musical about the life of Broadway showman George M. Cohan, which debuted to great success in Washington and received national media exposure along with the endorsement of Cohan himself. He received his first major New York credit as the co-author (again with Kerr) of a 1942 Broadway musical revue called "Count Me In." After serving in the US Army during World War II, where he continued creating as a writer and radio producer for the Army Recruitment Service, he returned to civilian life as a drama teacher at his alma mater. In 1949, he published his first novel, "Edge of Doom," which Samuel Goldwyn produced as a feature film in 1950. He followed up "Edge of Doom" with "Signs and Wonders" in 1953. He then published "The Quiet Gun," a literary western, and "The Love Tap," a mystery, in the 1970s. He married in 1945 to Eleanor Frances Buchroeder (1920–2004), and they had eight children and 4 grandchildren.
Writer. He was an American writer and theater artist who also achieved great success as a professor of young playwrights. He was the author of four novels, a half-dozen plays and several adaptations of plays and novels that were produced on stage and on television. After writing some well-received plays as an undergrad at Catholic University in Washington, District of Columbia, he published a play version of Richard Connell's short story "Brother Orchid," which became a staple of the Samuel French catalog and inspired Hollywood to adapt the story for a film starring Edward G. Robinson. (He received no credit.) In collaboration with Walter Kerr, he wrote "Yankee Doodle Boy," a musical about the life of Broadway showman George M. Cohan, which debuted to great success in Washington and received national media exposure along with the endorsement of Cohan himself. He received his first major New York credit as the co-author (again with Kerr) of a 1942 Broadway musical revue called "Count Me In." After serving in the US Army during World War II, where he continued creating as a writer and radio producer for the Army Recruitment Service, he returned to civilian life as a drama teacher at his alma mater. In 1949, he published his first novel, "Edge of Doom," which Samuel Goldwyn produced as a feature film in 1950. He followed up "Edge of Doom" with "Signs and Wonders" in 1953. He then published "The Quiet Gun," a literary western, and "The Love Tap," a mystery, in the 1970s. He married in 1945 to Eleanor Frances Buchroeder (1920–2004), and they had eight children and 4 grandchildren.

Bio by: Mayvee Smith


Inscription

MSGT US ARMY
WORLD WAR II



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Stan Jett
  • Added: Mar 3, 2014
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/125823540/leo_b-brady: accessed ), memorial page for Leo B Brady (23 Jan 1917–18 Nov 1984), Find a Grave Memorial ID 125823540, citing Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, Prince George's County, Maryland, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.