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Rev Lathrop Cooley

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Rev Lathrop Cooley

Birth
Genesee County, New York, USA
Death
4 Jan 1910 (aged 88)
Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Burial
Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Plot
Section 27 Lot 5
Memorial ID
125610205 View Source

History of the Western Reserve, Volume 3
By Harriet Taylor Upton, Harry Gardner Cutler

Rev. Lathrop Cooley. On the 2nd of January, 1910, was summoned to the life eternal this venerable, distinguished and honored citizen, one of the grand old adopted sons of the historic Western Reserve and one whose life was signally exalted and consecrated, making, him a power for good during long years of faithful and effective service in the aiding and uplifting of his fellow men. A man of scholarly attainments, a deep thinker, a true gentleman of the courtly and dignified old school type, he was as broad and liberal in spirit as he was sincere and devout in his convictions. His was the gentle simplicity of true nobility of character, and it is most consonant that in this publication be accorded a tribute of recognition to his life and labors. His was the faith that makes faithful and he ever held the highest sense oLhis stewardship as a clergyman and as a man among men. For' more than three score of years Mr. Cooley was active in the work of the ministry. He exerted a wide influence in the clarifying and invigorating of the moral and religious atmosphere of the Western Reserve and was eminently entitled to the uniform veneration and respect in which he was held by young and old.
Rev. Lathrop Cooley was born in Genesee county, New York, on the 25th of October, 1821, being one in a family of nine children, all of whom grew to maturity and reared families. He was a son of Chester Cooley and the original American progenitor of the line came to the new world from England, becoming one of the early settlers of Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Chester Cooley was born and reared among the picturesque hills of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, whence he removed to Genesee county, New York, in the early part of the nineteenth century.
The subject of this memoir, familiarly and affectionately known to his old neighbors and friends as Elder Cooley, gained his preliminary education in the common schools of his native state, after which he continued his studies in Brooklyn Academy and still later at Bethany College, at Bethany, West Virginia.
Early manifestating strong religious tendencies and deep spiritual convictions, he studied for the ministry, taught school for a time, and began preaching at the age of twenty-two years. His first sermon was at his home church, North Eaton, Lorain county, Ohio, to which state he had come after leaving college in West Virginia. For many years it had been his custom to visit this North Eaton church on the second Sunday of July, marking the anniversary of his delivery of his first sermon in the original edifice. Had he lived until July, 1910, he would have been able to make his sixty-sixth anniversary pilgrimage to the church that was endeared to him through memories and associations of many years.
At the age of twenty-four years Mr. Cooley was called to the pastorate of the Franklin Circle church at Cleveland, Ohio, being the first regular incumbent of this pastoral charge. With the exception of a year passed in Chicago and vicinity, his life work was done in the Western Reserve, and for more than sixty years he had been an active minister of the Disciples' church. He had long pastorates in Cleveland, Akron, Painesville, North Royalton and North Eaton. In 1877 he started the Disciples' mission that met at the corner of Erie and Hamilton streets in the city of Cleveland. In 1883, this mission became the Cedar Avenue church, and in 1909 the church removed its headquarters to Crawford road.
In each of the many places in which he served in the ministerial office Mr. Cooley won the love and esteem not only of his immediate parishioners but also of the community at large. There can be naught of inconsistency in offering the statement that he was without doubt one of the most influential and popular clergymen known in the history of the Western Reserve. He was ever tolerant and kindly in his attitude to other "households of faith," having no room in his heart for bigotry and ever holding the needs of humanity as of more importance than mere dogmas and creeds. He counted works and life above mere professions of faith, and the cardinal thought in his teaching was the care for and uplifting of the immortal soul. He had the strongest convictions and there was naught of vacillation in his course as a clergyman or as a man. He was a forceful and eloquent speaker, drawing, upon the abundant resources of a large and mature mind, and his zeal and devotion never flagged in the slightest degree. He was president of the Christian Missionary Society, and was a valued member of the board of trustees of Hiram College, to whose support he contributed with much liberality. During his long years of service as a clergyman Mr. Cooley had officiated at more than five hundred weddings and conducted more than two thousand funeral services. He was a man of fine physique and noble cast of features, and was frequently referred to as one of the best-looking men of the historic old Western Reserve. Although nearly ninety years of age at the time of his demise, he was active in his work up to the last. For many years he passed the summer seasons in Medina, passing the winters in his pleasant home in the city of Cleveland, where he died on the 2nd of January, 1910, surrounded by his immediate family and friends—a veritable patriarch and a noble citizen whose loss is mourned in the Western Reserve, where he so long lived and labored.
Mr. Cooley was twice married. In 1848 he wedded Miss Laura Reid, daughter of Harris Reid, who was a pioneer settler of Medina county. Mrs. Cooley was summoned to the life eternal in 1893, an----------------------------------------------------------
A fountain was erected in his honor in Medina:
http://www.sculpturecenter.org/oosi/items/show/267

History of the Western Reserve, Volume 3
By Harriet Taylor Upton, Harry Gardner Cutler

Rev. Lathrop Cooley. On the 2nd of January, 1910, was summoned to the life eternal this venerable, distinguished and honored citizen, one of the grand old adopted sons of the historic Western Reserve and one whose life was signally exalted and consecrated, making, him a power for good during long years of faithful and effective service in the aiding and uplifting of his fellow men. A man of scholarly attainments, a deep thinker, a true gentleman of the courtly and dignified old school type, he was as broad and liberal in spirit as he was sincere and devout in his convictions. His was the gentle simplicity of true nobility of character, and it is most consonant that in this publication be accorded a tribute of recognition to his life and labors. His was the faith that makes faithful and he ever held the highest sense oLhis stewardship as a clergyman and as a man among men. For' more than three score of years Mr. Cooley was active in the work of the ministry. He exerted a wide influence in the clarifying and invigorating of the moral and religious atmosphere of the Western Reserve and was eminently entitled to the uniform veneration and respect in which he was held by young and old.
Rev. Lathrop Cooley was born in Genesee county, New York, on the 25th of October, 1821, being one in a family of nine children, all of whom grew to maturity and reared families. He was a son of Chester Cooley and the original American progenitor of the line came to the new world from England, becoming one of the early settlers of Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Chester Cooley was born and reared among the picturesque hills of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, whence he removed to Genesee county, New York, in the early part of the nineteenth century.
The subject of this memoir, familiarly and affectionately known to his old neighbors and friends as Elder Cooley, gained his preliminary education in the common schools of his native state, after which he continued his studies in Brooklyn Academy and still later at Bethany College, at Bethany, West Virginia.
Early manifestating strong religious tendencies and deep spiritual convictions, he studied for the ministry, taught school for a time, and began preaching at the age of twenty-two years. His first sermon was at his home church, North Eaton, Lorain county, Ohio, to which state he had come after leaving college in West Virginia. For many years it had been his custom to visit this North Eaton church on the second Sunday of July, marking the anniversary of his delivery of his first sermon in the original edifice. Had he lived until July, 1910, he would have been able to make his sixty-sixth anniversary pilgrimage to the church that was endeared to him through memories and associations of many years.
At the age of twenty-four years Mr. Cooley was called to the pastorate of the Franklin Circle church at Cleveland, Ohio, being the first regular incumbent of this pastoral charge. With the exception of a year passed in Chicago and vicinity, his life work was done in the Western Reserve, and for more than sixty years he had been an active minister of the Disciples' church. He had long pastorates in Cleveland, Akron, Painesville, North Royalton and North Eaton. In 1877 he started the Disciples' mission that met at the corner of Erie and Hamilton streets in the city of Cleveland. In 1883, this mission became the Cedar Avenue church, and in 1909 the church removed its headquarters to Crawford road.
In each of the many places in which he served in the ministerial office Mr. Cooley won the love and esteem not only of his immediate parishioners but also of the community at large. There can be naught of inconsistency in offering the statement that he was without doubt one of the most influential and popular clergymen known in the history of the Western Reserve. He was ever tolerant and kindly in his attitude to other "households of faith," having no room in his heart for bigotry and ever holding the needs of humanity as of more importance than mere dogmas and creeds. He counted works and life above mere professions of faith, and the cardinal thought in his teaching was the care for and uplifting of the immortal soul. He had the strongest convictions and there was naught of vacillation in his course as a clergyman or as a man. He was a forceful and eloquent speaker, drawing, upon the abundant resources of a large and mature mind, and his zeal and devotion never flagged in the slightest degree. He was president of the Christian Missionary Society, and was a valued member of the board of trustees of Hiram College, to whose support he contributed with much liberality. During his long years of service as a clergyman Mr. Cooley had officiated at more than five hundred weddings and conducted more than two thousand funeral services. He was a man of fine physique and noble cast of features, and was frequently referred to as one of the best-looking men of the historic old Western Reserve. Although nearly ninety years of age at the time of his demise, he was active in his work up to the last. For many years he passed the summer seasons in Medina, passing the winters in his pleasant home in the city of Cleveland, where he died on the 2nd of January, 1910, surrounded by his immediate family and friends—a veritable patriarch and a noble citizen whose loss is mourned in the Western Reserve, where he so long lived and labored.
Mr. Cooley was twice married. In 1848 he wedded Miss Laura Reid, daughter of Harris Reid, who was a pioneer settler of Medina county. Mrs. Cooley was summoned to the life eternal in 1893, an----------------------------------------------------------
A fountain was erected in his honor in Medina:
http://www.sculpturecenter.org/oosi/items/show/267


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  • Created by: Msmith
  • Added: 25 Feb 2014
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 125610205
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/125610205/lathrop-cooley: accessed ), memorial page for Rev Lathrop Cooley (25 Oct 1821–4 Jan 1910), Find a Grave Memorial ID 125610205, citing Woodland Cemetery, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA; Maintained by Msmith (contributor 47320929).