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Ens Stephen Leonard Fuld
Monument

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Ens Stephen Leonard Fuld Veteran

Birth
New York County, New York, USA
Death
9 Sep 1942 (aged 34)
At Sea
Monument
Manhattan, New York County, New York, USA Add to Map
Plot
Tablets of the missing
Memorial ID
View Source
Suggested edit from FAG Contributor (48021049) •
October 17, 1907, Stephen Leonard Fuld was born in New York City to Solomon and Dr. Florence Fuld. He had two siblings, Freddy and Ruth. Fuld, who would find his success in the burgeoning medium of radio, was born, notably, on the same day that Guglielmo Marconi began the first commercial transatlantic wireless service between Nova Scotia, Canada, and Clifden, Ireland.

Fuld grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and attended the prestigious Horace Mann School in Riverdale, where he graduated in 1925. He spent one year at Dartmouth College, before leaving in 1926. Fuld continued his education throughout the years at both New York University and Columbia University noting, “I did not attempt to establish formal credits for my coursework as I was concerned with self-improvement and did not contemplate obtaining a degree.”

Shortly after leaving Dartmouth, Fuld worked as a bond salesman before finding his footing in radio. First, he worked at the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) as a radio salesman, and then at the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). Fuld started as an account executive in the sales department and worked his way up to the Manager of Field Operations.

Fuld was married for six years to Jewel Dean Butler. After their divorce, the national press speculated on his involvement in a number of high profile romances, most notably to Hollywood star Dorothy Lamour. Fuld told the New York Daily News in 1939, “We’re from two different worlds, she’s a public figure and I’m just a radio man. But I’m very fond of her. More so than of any girl I ever knew.” In late 1942 Lamour, perhaps inspired by Fuld’s death, became known as the “Bond Bombshell,” and helped sell more war bonds than any other actress in Hollywood.
In between his schooling and various early jobs, Fuld showed a deep love of the sea. He joined the Merchant Marines while still in school and his positions ranged, in his words, from, “steward to an ordinary seaman.” His travels with the Merchant Marines took him as far as Shanghai, China and Yokohama, Japan.

Working in the world of broadcasting, Fuld was sure to have heard much about the early years of World War II, so it is not surprising that, although he was past draft age, he wanted to participate in the war effort. With his love of the sea, the U.S. Coast Guard seemed a natural fit. Fuld’s application for the U.S. Coast Guard included references from several high profile figures of the time: famed newsman Walter Winchell, aviation pioneer Sherman Fairchild (who wrote that Fuld was, “(A out) alert, aggressive, frank and honest”), and Jack Howard of the Scripps-Howard newspaper empire. It was Howard who further noted, “Fuld is a personable man of character, with a particular ability for administrative work requiring quick action without any sacrifice or thoroughness.” Fuld was quickly admitted and reported for service on June 23, 1942, in New York City with the rank of ensign.

Fuld served aboard the USS Muskeget. According to U.S. Coast Guard records, the Muskeget was a former freighter ship that was commissioned for service on July 1, 1942. The Muskeget had a permanent station out of Boston, Massachusetts for duty with the Weather Observation Patrol. Sadly, the Muskeget did not get to do her duty for very long, and she became the only weather ship lost in World War II. The official U.S. Coast Guard history from this point notes:

The USS Muskeget departed Boston on the afternoon of 24 August. The last report on the weather was received from her September 9th, 1942. On September, 11th 1942, the Monomoy reported she was unable to effect relief of the Muskeget due to failure to establish communications. Aircraft and ships in the vicinity were directed to search for and report any positive results. This search on 16 September proved fruitless.

The Muskeget was presumed lost in action with no survivors. At the time of her sinking, she had 121 men on board: nine commissioned officers, 107 enlisted men, one Public Health Service officer, and four civilian employees of the U.S. Weather Service. The government initially determined that there was not enough information to determine what sunk the Muskeget. After the war, German naval records recovered indicated that the German submarine U-755 reported torpedoing a U.S. auxiliary merchant cruiser in Muskeget's area of operation on September 9, 1942. All men aboard the ship were awarded Purple Hearts for their service.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Linda Mutch (#47891291)
Stephen Leonard Fuld was a graduate of Horace Mann & Dartmouth. He was a CBS Broadcasting Executive in Manhattan. Stephen was adored by my Grandmother and all his friends. Sadly, on September 9, 1942, he was aboard the Muskeget which was bombed by German torpedo boats. Uncle Stephen was Lost at Sea.
Along with many other brave souls. He is dearly missed.
--------------------------------------------------------

US COAST GUARD WORLD WAR II
Ensign, Stephen L. Fuld MIA/KIA
Hometown: Darien Connectecut
Ship: USCGC MUSKEGET WAG-48
Service # 220832
Awards: Purple Heart, European - African - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal
Captain: Lt. Comander Charles E. Toft

Mission: North Atlantic Weather Patrol
Mission Date: 9-Sep-42
Location: Boston - Iceland
Cause: Torpedoed U-755
Complement:
34 merchant seamen
9 commissioned officers,
107 enlisted men, 1 Public Health Service officer,
4 U.S. Weather Service employees

Crew: of 121 MIA/KIA

Ensign Fuld was lost with the crew of USS Muskeget (WAG 48) At 15.16 hours on 9 September 1942 when U-755 fired a spread of three torpedoes at an auxiliary vessel and heard two hits, followed by sinking noises. This must have been the USS Muskeget (WAG 48). All men on board were lost: nine officers, 107 ratings, one Public Health Service officer and four civilian US Weather Service employees officially declared KIA 1 year and a day later in September 1943.

Fuld appears Tablets of the Missing East Coast Memorial
Manhattan New York New York. He also has a cenotaph memorial marker at The Evergreens Cemetery Brooklyn Kings County New York his body was never recovered.

Built as American steam merchant Cornish for Eastern SS Lines Inc, Boston MA and served on the Great Lakes. On 29 Dec, 1941 acquired by the US Navy and converted to the auxiliary patrol yacht USS YAG-9 by the Sullivan Drydock & Repair Co, New York. The vessel was armed with one 4in, one 3in and four 20mm guns and two depth charge tracks and commissioned on 3 Jan, 1942. She was assigned to the Third Naval District and used for patrol duty off New York until renamed and reclassified USS Muskeget (AG 48) on 30 May 1942.

On 1 Jul, 1942, transferred to the US Coast Guard, reclassified as USS Muskeget (WAG 48) and assigned to the station at Boston for duty as weather ship in the Weather Observation Patrol. The ship then patrolled on Weather Station No. 2 (53°N/42°30W) from 6 to 27 July.

Notes on event
On 24 Aug, 1942, the USS Muskeget (WAG 48) departed for her second patrol as weather ship on the Weather Station No. 2 (53°N/42°30W) and sent weather reports until 9 September, but then no further messages were received. When the weather ship USS Monomoy (WAG 275) failed to locate her on relief four days later, a combined search by aircraft and ships was carried out on 16 September, but proved fruitless and the ship was reported missing.

Visit the virtual cemetery of USCGC Muskeget
" Click Here "
Suggested edit from FAG Contributor (48021049) •
October 17, 1907, Stephen Leonard Fuld was born in New York City to Solomon and Dr. Florence Fuld. He had two siblings, Freddy and Ruth. Fuld, who would find his success in the burgeoning medium of radio, was born, notably, on the same day that Guglielmo Marconi began the first commercial transatlantic wireless service between Nova Scotia, Canada, and Clifden, Ireland.

Fuld grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and attended the prestigious Horace Mann School in Riverdale, where he graduated in 1925. He spent one year at Dartmouth College, before leaving in 1926. Fuld continued his education throughout the years at both New York University and Columbia University noting, “I did not attempt to establish formal credits for my coursework as I was concerned with self-improvement and did not contemplate obtaining a degree.”

Shortly after leaving Dartmouth, Fuld worked as a bond salesman before finding his footing in radio. First, he worked at the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) as a radio salesman, and then at the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). Fuld started as an account executive in the sales department and worked his way up to the Manager of Field Operations.

Fuld was married for six years to Jewel Dean Butler. After their divorce, the national press speculated on his involvement in a number of high profile romances, most notably to Hollywood star Dorothy Lamour. Fuld told the New York Daily News in 1939, “We’re from two different worlds, she’s a public figure and I’m just a radio man. But I’m very fond of her. More so than of any girl I ever knew.” In late 1942 Lamour, perhaps inspired by Fuld’s death, became known as the “Bond Bombshell,” and helped sell more war bonds than any other actress in Hollywood.
In between his schooling and various early jobs, Fuld showed a deep love of the sea. He joined the Merchant Marines while still in school and his positions ranged, in his words, from, “steward to an ordinary seaman.” His travels with the Merchant Marines took him as far as Shanghai, China and Yokohama, Japan.

Working in the world of broadcasting, Fuld was sure to have heard much about the early years of World War II, so it is not surprising that, although he was past draft age, he wanted to participate in the war effort. With his love of the sea, the U.S. Coast Guard seemed a natural fit. Fuld’s application for the U.S. Coast Guard included references from several high profile figures of the time: famed newsman Walter Winchell, aviation pioneer Sherman Fairchild (who wrote that Fuld was, “(A out) alert, aggressive, frank and honest”), and Jack Howard of the Scripps-Howard newspaper empire. It was Howard who further noted, “Fuld is a personable man of character, with a particular ability for administrative work requiring quick action without any sacrifice or thoroughness.” Fuld was quickly admitted and reported for service on June 23, 1942, in New York City with the rank of ensign.

Fuld served aboard the USS Muskeget. According to U.S. Coast Guard records, the Muskeget was a former freighter ship that was commissioned for service on July 1, 1942. The Muskeget had a permanent station out of Boston, Massachusetts for duty with the Weather Observation Patrol. Sadly, the Muskeget did not get to do her duty for very long, and she became the only weather ship lost in World War II. The official U.S. Coast Guard history from this point notes:

The USS Muskeget departed Boston on the afternoon of 24 August. The last report on the weather was received from her September 9th, 1942. On September, 11th 1942, the Monomoy reported she was unable to effect relief of the Muskeget due to failure to establish communications. Aircraft and ships in the vicinity were directed to search for and report any positive results. This search on 16 September proved fruitless.

The Muskeget was presumed lost in action with no survivors. At the time of her sinking, she had 121 men on board: nine commissioned officers, 107 enlisted men, one Public Health Service officer, and four civilian employees of the U.S. Weather Service. The government initially determined that there was not enough information to determine what sunk the Muskeget. After the war, German naval records recovered indicated that the German submarine U-755 reported torpedoing a U.S. auxiliary merchant cruiser in Muskeget's area of operation on September 9, 1942. All men aboard the ship were awarded Purple Hearts for their service.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Linda Mutch (#47891291)
Stephen Leonard Fuld was a graduate of Horace Mann & Dartmouth. He was a CBS Broadcasting Executive in Manhattan. Stephen was adored by my Grandmother and all his friends. Sadly, on September 9, 1942, he was aboard the Muskeget which was bombed by German torpedo boats. Uncle Stephen was Lost at Sea.
Along with many other brave souls. He is dearly missed.
--------------------------------------------------------

US COAST GUARD WORLD WAR II
Ensign, Stephen L. Fuld MIA/KIA
Hometown: Darien Connectecut
Ship: USCGC MUSKEGET WAG-48
Service # 220832
Awards: Purple Heart, European - African - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal
Captain: Lt. Comander Charles E. Toft

Mission: North Atlantic Weather Patrol
Mission Date: 9-Sep-42
Location: Boston - Iceland
Cause: Torpedoed U-755
Complement:
34 merchant seamen
9 commissioned officers,
107 enlisted men, 1 Public Health Service officer,
4 U.S. Weather Service employees

Crew: of 121 MIA/KIA

Ensign Fuld was lost with the crew of USS Muskeget (WAG 48) At 15.16 hours on 9 September 1942 when U-755 fired a spread of three torpedoes at an auxiliary vessel and heard two hits, followed by sinking noises. This must have been the USS Muskeget (WAG 48). All men on board were lost: nine officers, 107 ratings, one Public Health Service officer and four civilian US Weather Service employees officially declared KIA 1 year and a day later in September 1943.

Fuld appears Tablets of the Missing East Coast Memorial
Manhattan New York New York. He also has a cenotaph memorial marker at The Evergreens Cemetery Brooklyn Kings County New York his body was never recovered.

Built as American steam merchant Cornish for Eastern SS Lines Inc, Boston MA and served on the Great Lakes. On 29 Dec, 1941 acquired by the US Navy and converted to the auxiliary patrol yacht USS YAG-9 by the Sullivan Drydock & Repair Co, New York. The vessel was armed with one 4in, one 3in and four 20mm guns and two depth charge tracks and commissioned on 3 Jan, 1942. She was assigned to the Third Naval District and used for patrol duty off New York until renamed and reclassified USS Muskeget (AG 48) on 30 May 1942.

On 1 Jul, 1942, transferred to the US Coast Guard, reclassified as USS Muskeget (WAG 48) and assigned to the station at Boston for duty as weather ship in the Weather Observation Patrol. The ship then patrolled on Weather Station No. 2 (53°N/42°30W) from 6 to 27 July.

Notes on event
On 24 Aug, 1942, the USS Muskeget (WAG 48) departed for her second patrol as weather ship on the Weather Station No. 2 (53°N/42°30W) and sent weather reports until 9 September, but then no further messages were received. When the weather ship USS Monomoy (WAG 275) failed to locate her on relief four days later, a combined search by aircraft and ships was carried out on 16 September, but proved fruitless and the ship was reported missing.

Visit the virtual cemetery of USCGC Muskeget
" Click Here "


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