Advertisement

 Marin Sais

Advertisement

Marin Sais Famous memorial

Original Name
Mae Smith
Birth
San Rafael, Marin County, California, USA
Death
31 Dec 1971 (aged 81)
Woodland Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Plot
Fidelity section, Map #G05, Lot 3698, Single Ground Interment Space 2 (unmarked)
Memorial ID
12387 View Source

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the strait-laced Sarah Burton in "Riders of the Frontier" (1939). Born Mae Smith, she began her career as a leading lady on the stage in stock companies. Upon being introduced to director Eugene Mullin while attending a conference at the Vitagraph Studios, he was so impressed dark good looks, slim physique, and remarkable sense of humor, upon taking notice of her potential he arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her appearing under his supervision per a leading role in "Twelfth Night" (1910). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress appearing in over 100 features; often typecast as wives, mothers, grandmothers, old maids, relatives, women with a past, gold diggers, chorines, torch singers, secretaries, white-collared workers, nurses, beauticians, telephone operators, retail clerks, waitresses, educators, landladies, eccentrics, curmudgeons, neighbors, busybodies, dowagers, matrons, housekeepers, foreigners, indigenous people, reporters, seamstresses, wardens, madams, cooks, servants, singers, and matriarchs. She appeared in such feature films as " Walk, -- You, Walk!" (1912), "Shannon of the Sixth" (1914), "Mysteries of the Grand Hotel" (1915), "The Social Pirates" (1916), "A Whirlwind of Whiskers" (1917), "His Birthright" (1918), "Bonds of Honor" (1919), "Thunderbolt Jack" (1920), "Hills of Hate" (1921), "Riders of the Law" (1922), "Wolf Tracks" (1923), "The Hellion" (1924), "A Roaring Adventure" (1925), "The Wild Horse Stampede" (1926), "Men of Daring" (1927), "A Son of the Desert" (1928), "Come and Get It" (1929), "Wheels of Destiny" (1934), "Outlaw Rule" (1935), "Reefer Madness" (1936), "Windjammer" (1937), "I Stand Accuse" (1938), "Oklahoma Terror" (1939), "Convicted Woman" (1940), "Cracked Nuts" (1941), "South of Santa Fe" (1942), "Harvest Melody" (1943), "Oath of Vengeance" (1944), "Along the Navajo Trail" (1945), "Stagecoach to Denver" (1946), "Big Town After Dark" (1947), "The Fighting Redhead" (1949), and "The Great Jesse James Raid" (1953). During her career, she was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, had been a regular parishioner of the Catholic church, was a member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, presided on her local charters of the American Red Cross and the United Way, sat on the board of directors for the California division of the Homemakers of America, was cited by gossip columnist Louella Parsons as being "The Shining Star of the Silent Era", sang in the Los Angeles Opera, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, was the celebrity spokeswoman for RCA Victor and Paper Mate Ballpoint Pens, and she was married to character actor Jack Hoxie from 1920 to 1925 (their union ended in divorce and produced no children). Following her 1953 retirement, she spent the remainder of her life living comfortably at the Motion Picture and Television House devoting her time to religious and charitable causes until her death from the complications of cerebral arteriosclerosis.

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the strait-laced Sarah Burton in "Riders of the Frontier" (1939). Born Mae Smith, she began her career as a leading lady on the stage in stock companies. Upon being introduced to director Eugene Mullin while attending a conference at the Vitagraph Studios, he was so impressed dark good looks, slim physique, and remarkable sense of humor, upon taking notice of her potential he arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her appearing under his supervision per a leading role in "Twelfth Night" (1910). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress appearing in over 100 features; often typecast as wives, mothers, grandmothers, old maids, relatives, women with a past, gold diggers, chorines, torch singers, secretaries, white-collared workers, nurses, beauticians, telephone operators, retail clerks, waitresses, educators, landladies, eccentrics, curmudgeons, neighbors, busybodies, dowagers, matrons, housekeepers, foreigners, indigenous people, reporters, seamstresses, wardens, madams, cooks, servants, singers, and matriarchs. She appeared in such feature films as " Walk, -- You, Walk!" (1912), "Shannon of the Sixth" (1914), "Mysteries of the Grand Hotel" (1915), "The Social Pirates" (1916), "A Whirlwind of Whiskers" (1917), "His Birthright" (1918), "Bonds of Honor" (1919), "Thunderbolt Jack" (1920), "Hills of Hate" (1921), "Riders of the Law" (1922), "Wolf Tracks" (1923), "The Hellion" (1924), "A Roaring Adventure" (1925), "The Wild Horse Stampede" (1926), "Men of Daring" (1927), "A Son of the Desert" (1928), "Come and Get It" (1929), "Wheels of Destiny" (1934), "Outlaw Rule" (1935), "Reefer Madness" (1936), "Windjammer" (1937), "I Stand Accuse" (1938), "Oklahoma Terror" (1939), "Convicted Woman" (1940), "Cracked Nuts" (1941), "South of Santa Fe" (1942), "Harvest Melody" (1943), "Oath of Vengeance" (1944), "Along the Navajo Trail" (1945), "Stagecoach to Denver" (1946), "Big Town After Dark" (1947), "The Fighting Redhead" (1949), and "The Great Jesse James Raid" (1953). During her career, she was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, had been a regular parishioner of the Catholic church, was a member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, presided on her local charters of the American Red Cross and the United Way, sat on the board of directors for the California division of the Homemakers of America, was cited by gossip columnist Louella Parsons as being "The Shining Star of the Silent Era", sang in the Los Angeles Opera, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, was the celebrity spokeswoman for RCA Victor and Paper Mate Ballpoint Pens, and she was married to character actor Jack Hoxie from 1920 to 1925 (their union ended in divorce and produced no children). Following her 1953 retirement, she spent the remainder of her life living comfortably at the Motion Picture and Television House devoting her time to religious and charitable causes until her death from the complications of cerebral arteriosclerosis.

Bio by: Lowell Thurgood

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Marin Sais?

Current rating:

19 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 10 Sep 2000
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 12387
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12387/marin-sais: accessed ), memorial page for Marin Sais (2 Aug 1890–31 Dec 1971), Find a Grave Memorial ID 12387, citing Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave .