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William Wellington Spencer

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William Wellington Spencer

Birth
Walton, Delaware County, New York, USA
Death
11 Oct 1892 (aged 84)
Ravanna, Mercer County, Missouri, USA
Burial
Ravanna, Mercer County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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William, unlike most people of his time, lived in many places and had first hand knowledge of much of the United States. He is known to have lived in New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska. He lived in Bountiful, Utah probably with his son Isaac Asa Spencer, from 1884 to 1889.

In 1887 while in Utah, he applied for an Army pension due to his disabilities. William's pension applications are available and are very informative regarding William' life and help document his residences.

William was living with his oldest son, George Wellington Spencer, in Ravanna, Mercer, Missouri at the time of his death on the 11th of October, 1892.

William had one wife, Emily Luverne Davis, who died in 1862 less than a year after Isaac Asa was born.

William had two brothers, Dr. Ethan Spencer and Harvey Spencer. Ethan's son Enos founded the Spencerian Business College, located in Louisville Kentucky, in 1892.

William was an early member of the Mormon Church and his name is mentioned several times in church history. He served on a mission to the Eastern States in 1835. In 1842, he was appointed to be a Bishop in Nauvoo Illinois for a Ward East of Nauvoo and North of Young Street. His most notable accomplishment was he served with the Mormon Battalion, Company D, US Army.

During the War with Mexico, the battalion marched over 2000 miles, built roads, and through other efforts helped open up the west. William was a member of a detail party, escorting General Kearny, when they found and disposed of bodies of the famous Donner Party in June 1847.

About the same time period, William was thrown from an Army mule after a stirrup broke. His left shoulder was permanently damaged and ribs were broken when the mule kicked William, also resulting in hemorrhaging of a lung.

William was disabled the rest of his life with the main injury being on his left side. He was left handed and could not continue in his trade as a carpenter and millwright. However, William maintained his excellent penmenship, which can be seen in Army pension applications.

As William aged, he developed vision problems. He became blind and physically unable to leave his son's home where he died October 11th, 1892.

Wiliam's sacrifice was not in vain. Although William and his Morman Battalion companions did not become involved in any military actions other than the "Battle of the Bulls", their efforts had a lasting impact regarding the development of the Western part of the Nation.His parents are Isaac Spencer (1780 - ?) and Annie Whitmore (1779 - ?)
He was a member of the Mormon Battalion (1846 - 1847).

The cemetery he is laid to rest in is formerly known as Otterbein Cemetery in Ravanna, Missouri
Township : T65
Range : R23
Section : S27
William, unlike most people of his time, lived in many places and had first hand knowledge of much of the United States. He is known to have lived in New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska. He lived in Bountiful, Utah probably with his son Isaac Asa Spencer, from 1884 to 1889.

In 1887 while in Utah, he applied for an Army pension due to his disabilities. William's pension applications are available and are very informative regarding William' life and help document his residences.

William was living with his oldest son, George Wellington Spencer, in Ravanna, Mercer, Missouri at the time of his death on the 11th of October, 1892.

William had one wife, Emily Luverne Davis, who died in 1862 less than a year after Isaac Asa was born.

William had two brothers, Dr. Ethan Spencer and Harvey Spencer. Ethan's son Enos founded the Spencerian Business College, located in Louisville Kentucky, in 1892.

William was an early member of the Mormon Church and his name is mentioned several times in church history. He served on a mission to the Eastern States in 1835. In 1842, he was appointed to be a Bishop in Nauvoo Illinois for a Ward East of Nauvoo and North of Young Street. His most notable accomplishment was he served with the Mormon Battalion, Company D, US Army.

During the War with Mexico, the battalion marched over 2000 miles, built roads, and through other efforts helped open up the west. William was a member of a detail party, escorting General Kearny, when they found and disposed of bodies of the famous Donner Party in June 1847.

About the same time period, William was thrown from an Army mule after a stirrup broke. His left shoulder was permanently damaged and ribs were broken when the mule kicked William, also resulting in hemorrhaging of a lung.

William was disabled the rest of his life with the main injury being on his left side. He was left handed and could not continue in his trade as a carpenter and millwright. However, William maintained his excellent penmenship, which can be seen in Army pension applications.

As William aged, he developed vision problems. He became blind and physically unable to leave his son's home where he died October 11th, 1892.

Wiliam's sacrifice was not in vain. Although William and his Morman Battalion companions did not become involved in any military actions other than the "Battle of the Bulls", their efforts had a lasting impact regarding the development of the Western part of the Nation.His parents are Isaac Spencer (1780 - ?) and Annie Whitmore (1779 - ?)
He was a member of the Mormon Battalion (1846 - 1847).

The cemetery he is laid to rest in is formerly known as Otterbein Cemetery in Ravanna, Missouri
Township : T65
Range : R23
Section : S27


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