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 Donald Arthur Glaser

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Donald Arthur Glaser Famous memorial

Birth
Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Death
28 Feb 2013 (aged 86)
Berkeley, Alameda County, California, USA
Burial
Oakland, Alameda County, California, USA
Memorial ID
120836894 View Source

Nobel Prize Recipient. He was an American physicist and neurobiologist, who was awarded the 1960 Nobel Prize in Physics. According to the Nobel Prize committee, he was honored "for the invention of the bubble chamber." Successful in high-energy laboratories, this instrument is used in subatomic particle physics. He received 13 nominations for the Nobel candidacy, and submitted a nomination for Charles Hard Townes, the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics recipient. After attending public schools, he graduated in 1946 with a degree in mathematics and physics from the Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland, Ohio, which is now known as the Case Western Reserve University, and obtained his doctoral research from California Institute of Technology in Pasadena in 1949. On the basis of his experimental studies of the momentum spectrum of high energy cosmic ray and mesons at sea level, he became first an instructor at the University of Michigan in 1949, then Professor in 1957 at the same university, and later in 1959 a Professor of Physics at University of California at Berkeley. His researches were supported originally by the University of Michigan and later by the National Science Foundation of the United States and from the United States Atomic Energy Commission. From 1962, he began to study molecular biology interesting himself mainly to cancer caused by ultraviolet rays, and as a result of this research he obtained the title and the appointment of Professor in molecular biology in 1964. In 1971 he cofounded the Cetus Corp., a biotechnology company that developed interleukin-2 and interferon for cancer chemotherapy, which he sold in 1991. His research in neurobiology in 1980s led to conducting experiments on vision and how it is processed by the human brain. Besides the Nobel Prize, he received many honors for his works, including the Henry Russell Award of the University of Michigan, Charles Vernon Boys Prize of the Physical Society of London, American Physical Society Prize, an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the Case Institute of Technology, the Elliott Cresson Gold Medal, which is the highest award from the Franklin Institute and the Gold Plate Award from American Academy of Achievement. He became one of the nine scientists from the University of California at Berkeley to receive the Nobel Prize in the 20th century. He married for the first time in 1960 and the couple had two children. After a divorce, he remarried in 1975. He died at home of natural causes.

Nobel Prize Recipient. He was an American physicist and neurobiologist, who was awarded the 1960 Nobel Prize in Physics. According to the Nobel Prize committee, he was honored "for the invention of the bubble chamber." Successful in high-energy laboratories, this instrument is used in subatomic particle physics. He received 13 nominations for the Nobel candidacy, and submitted a nomination for Charles Hard Townes, the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics recipient. After attending public schools, he graduated in 1946 with a degree in mathematics and physics from the Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland, Ohio, which is now known as the Case Western Reserve University, and obtained his doctoral research from California Institute of Technology in Pasadena in 1949. On the basis of his experimental studies of the momentum spectrum of high energy cosmic ray and mesons at sea level, he became first an instructor at the University of Michigan in 1949, then Professor in 1957 at the same university, and later in 1959 a Professor of Physics at University of California at Berkeley. His researches were supported originally by the University of Michigan and later by the National Science Foundation of the United States and from the United States Atomic Energy Commission. From 1962, he began to study molecular biology interesting himself mainly to cancer caused by ultraviolet rays, and as a result of this research he obtained the title and the appointment of Professor in molecular biology in 1964. In 1971 he cofounded the Cetus Corp., a biotechnology company that developed interleukin-2 and interferon for cancer chemotherapy, which he sold in 1991. His research in neurobiology in 1980s led to conducting experiments on vision and how it is processed by the human brain. Besides the Nobel Prize, he received many honors for his works, including the Henry Russell Award of the University of Michigan, Charles Vernon Boys Prize of the Physical Society of London, American Physical Society Prize, an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the Case Institute of Technology, the Elliott Cresson Gold Medal, which is the highest award from the Franklin Institute and the Gold Plate Award from American Academy of Achievement. He became one of the nine scientists from the University of California at Berkeley to receive the Nobel Prize in the 20th century. He married for the first time in 1960 and the couple had two children. After a divorce, he remarried in 1975. He died at home of natural causes.

Bio by: Linda Davis

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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Lucy & Chris
  • Added: 26 Nov 2013
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 120836894
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/120836894/donald-arthur-glaser: accessed ), memorial page for Donald Arthur Glaser (21 Sep 1926–28 Feb 2013), Find a Grave Memorial ID 120836894, citing Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Alameda County, California, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave .