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Gustavus Tesch

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Gustavus Tesch

Birth
Germany
Death
7 Sep 1880 (aged 39)
Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, USA
Burial
Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, USA Add to Map
Plot
Masonic D
Memorial ID
View Source
The unexpected death of Gustav Tesch occurred last night about 9 o'clock. As mentioned yesterday, a report was circulated yesterday morning that Mr. Tesch was dead; but it proved to be unfounded. Mr. Tesch at the request of his physician was keeping himself quiet in the hope of securing relief from an affection of the heart, with which he had been troubled for nearly two years; but was in no wise(sp) considered dangerous. In the course of the afternoon, however, he commenced growing worse and complained of great pain in the region of the heart. About nine o'clock he called his wife to him as he lay in bed, and with considerable effort he raised himself up to a sitting posture, only to fall back dead. He had been treated for aneurysm of an artery, supposed to be close to the heart, but a post mortem examination held this afternoon by Drs. Russell and Steele at which Drs. Linde were present disclosed the fact that one of the sacks of the valve of the aorta was entirely gone and ossification existed largely just above the valve, at the beginning of the aorta. A widening of the aorta slightly further on was found, with the tissue very thin. It was definitely settled that aneurysm was not the cause of his death.
Mr. Tesch was born near Brandenberg, Germany, Oct. 1st, 1840, and would consequently have been forty years of age next month. He came to America in 1860, and came with friends direct to Oshkosh. At the breaking out of the war, although yet unable to speak or understand the English language but little, he enlisted in the third Wisconsin regiment infantry and went to the front. He served three years and six months, during which he was engaged in sixteen battles and severely wounded three times, but taking his place in the ranks again each time as soon as able. On returning home from the war he clerked for a time with Wm. Suhl and afterwards went into partnership with his father-in-law, Mr. Peek, in the cigar and grocery business, subsequently going into business by himself. He did business on Main street at the time of the great fire, but after the great fire purchased the grocery on Algoma street, near James street, which he was still conducting. Two years ago Mr. Tesch was appointed Deputy United States Marshall. Mr. Tesch had accumulated some property and leaves his family in good circumstances. He was married Sept. 5, 1865, and leaves a wife and four children. He has a mother and two sisters in Chicago who are expected here this evening. Two sisters and a brother still reside in the old country. He was insured in Classes A and B in the Masonic order amounting to $6,500, and had $1,000 insurance with the Turners. Mr. Tesch was a man quite prominent in local politics and was an enterprising, wide-awake citizen.
The funeral will take place Friday at 2 p.m. from the residence.
(SOURCE: Oshkosh Daily Northwestern - Wed, 8 Sept 1880, Pg 4)

In addition to the above info that also appeared in the Weekly:
The funeral of Mr. Tesch took place Friday afternoon from the residence on Algoma street. The services were conducted by Rev. J.R. Creighton, pastor of Algoma Methodist church. There was a large attendance, the masons and members of the Post G.A.R. attending in a body. The remains were deposited in the masonic burying ground in accordance with the rites of the masonic order. The pall bearers were C.D. Cleveland, F.B. Morgan, Geo. M. Paine, T.S. Allen, A.W. Weisbrod and J.H. Martin.
(SOURCE: Oshkosh Weekly Northwestern - Thurs, 16 September 1880)

Among the residences which illustrate this work is that of Gustavus Tesch, on Algoma Street. Mr. Tesch migrated from Germany in 1859, and settled in Oshkosh in that year. On the outbreak fo the war, he volunteered and served in the field during its continuance. On its conclusion, he returned to this city, and shortly afterward engaged in the grocery business, which he has conducted very successfully to the present time. He possesses every qualification for a successful business man; being energetic, prompt, diligent and enterprising, while his pleasing and obliging ways make him popular with his customers. Gus is one of those who will always give good weight measure, and his store is the picture of neatness and order. He passed through the severe ordeal of four of the great fires; in each of which his property was totally destroyed. His heavy losses reduced his resources to a very limited amount, but despite of the most disheartening circumstances, he never yielded to discouragement, but manfully struggled against his misfortunes, and is now reaping the reward of his courageous efforts; standing on a solid financial basis, and ranking among the sound business man of this city.
He has received the compliment of being appointed Deputy United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Wisconsin.
Mr. Tesch has a large vineyard, in the culture of which he takes a great interest. This is cultivated with the same thoroughness with which he does everything, and the luxuriant growth of the vines, their fruitfulness and thrifty appearance, give every evidence of good management.
(SOURCE: History of Winnebago County - Harney - 1880)
The unexpected death of Gustav Tesch occurred last night about 9 o'clock. As mentioned yesterday, a report was circulated yesterday morning that Mr. Tesch was dead; but it proved to be unfounded. Mr. Tesch at the request of his physician was keeping himself quiet in the hope of securing relief from an affection of the heart, with which he had been troubled for nearly two years; but was in no wise(sp) considered dangerous. In the course of the afternoon, however, he commenced growing worse and complained of great pain in the region of the heart. About nine o'clock he called his wife to him as he lay in bed, and with considerable effort he raised himself up to a sitting posture, only to fall back dead. He had been treated for aneurysm of an artery, supposed to be close to the heart, but a post mortem examination held this afternoon by Drs. Russell and Steele at which Drs. Linde were present disclosed the fact that one of the sacks of the valve of the aorta was entirely gone and ossification existed largely just above the valve, at the beginning of the aorta. A widening of the aorta slightly further on was found, with the tissue very thin. It was definitely settled that aneurysm was not the cause of his death.
Mr. Tesch was born near Brandenberg, Germany, Oct. 1st, 1840, and would consequently have been forty years of age next month. He came to America in 1860, and came with friends direct to Oshkosh. At the breaking out of the war, although yet unable to speak or understand the English language but little, he enlisted in the third Wisconsin regiment infantry and went to the front. He served three years and six months, during which he was engaged in sixteen battles and severely wounded three times, but taking his place in the ranks again each time as soon as able. On returning home from the war he clerked for a time with Wm. Suhl and afterwards went into partnership with his father-in-law, Mr. Peek, in the cigar and grocery business, subsequently going into business by himself. He did business on Main street at the time of the great fire, but after the great fire purchased the grocery on Algoma street, near James street, which he was still conducting. Two years ago Mr. Tesch was appointed Deputy United States Marshall. Mr. Tesch had accumulated some property and leaves his family in good circumstances. He was married Sept. 5, 1865, and leaves a wife and four children. He has a mother and two sisters in Chicago who are expected here this evening. Two sisters and a brother still reside in the old country. He was insured in Classes A and B in the Masonic order amounting to $6,500, and had $1,000 insurance with the Turners. Mr. Tesch was a man quite prominent in local politics and was an enterprising, wide-awake citizen.
The funeral will take place Friday at 2 p.m. from the residence.
(SOURCE: Oshkosh Daily Northwestern - Wed, 8 Sept 1880, Pg 4)

In addition to the above info that also appeared in the Weekly:
The funeral of Mr. Tesch took place Friday afternoon from the residence on Algoma street. The services were conducted by Rev. J.R. Creighton, pastor of Algoma Methodist church. There was a large attendance, the masons and members of the Post G.A.R. attending in a body. The remains were deposited in the masonic burying ground in accordance with the rites of the masonic order. The pall bearers were C.D. Cleveland, F.B. Morgan, Geo. M. Paine, T.S. Allen, A.W. Weisbrod and J.H. Martin.
(SOURCE: Oshkosh Weekly Northwestern - Thurs, 16 September 1880)

Among the residences which illustrate this work is that of Gustavus Tesch, on Algoma Street. Mr. Tesch migrated from Germany in 1859, and settled in Oshkosh in that year. On the outbreak fo the war, he volunteered and served in the field during its continuance. On its conclusion, he returned to this city, and shortly afterward engaged in the grocery business, which he has conducted very successfully to the present time. He possesses every qualification for a successful business man; being energetic, prompt, diligent and enterprising, while his pleasing and obliging ways make him popular with his customers. Gus is one of those who will always give good weight measure, and his store is the picture of neatness and order. He passed through the severe ordeal of four of the great fires; in each of which his property was totally destroyed. His heavy losses reduced his resources to a very limited amount, but despite of the most disheartening circumstances, he never yielded to discouragement, but manfully struggled against his misfortunes, and is now reaping the reward of his courageous efforts; standing on a solid financial basis, and ranking among the sound business man of this city.
He has received the compliment of being appointed Deputy United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Wisconsin.
Mr. Tesch has a large vineyard, in the culture of which he takes a great interest. This is cultivated with the same thoroughness with which he does everything, and the luxuriant growth of the vines, their fruitfulness and thrifty appearance, give every evidence of good management.
(SOURCE: History of Winnebago County - Harney - 1880)


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