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Judge William John Carr

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Judge William John Carr

Birth
Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Death 5 Aug 1917 (aged 54)
Hampton Bays, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Burial Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Plot St. John, Range D, Grave 39
Memorial ID 119752622 View Source
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The Brooklyn Daily Eagle

CARR-On Sunday, August 5, 1917, at Heather Cliff, Good Ground, L.I..WILLIAM J. CARR, Funeral on Wednesday August 8, form his late residence 831 Carroll St. Requiem Mass at St. Francis Xavier R.C. Church, Sixth av. and Carroll St. at 10 am Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery, Flatbush.
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The Brooklyn Eagle Mon Aug 6, 1917 pg 9

JUSTICE W.J. CARR DIES, WAS LONG ILL HEAT HASTENED END.
Jurist, Born in Brooklyn in 1862-Once Keen Corporation Lawyer.
FUNERAL HERE WEDNESDAY
Justice William J. Carr, of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court died yesterday morning at his summer home, "Heathercliff" at Good Ground, L.I., He was for ten years a justice of the supreme Court.
His death was not unexpected for he had been failing steadily for the last few days. He had been ill since late last year. His wife who has nursed him day and night for months died late in February this year, and the shock of her loss aggravated the jurist's illness.
Early in the spring he was compelled to cease work and he sought rest and medical aid at his summer home. Three doctors were in attendance for a time. and despite his physical frailty, Justice Carr partly recovered and for a time it was believed he would get well.
His strong heart was weakened by the hot weather of last week, however and by Saturday night he was so exhausted taht the doctors gave up hope. The end came at 9:30 o'clock Sunday morning while his six children were at his bedside.
There will be a requiem mass on Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock in St. Rosalie's Roman Catholic Church in good ground, of which Justice Carr was a founder and, up to his death a trustee.
The body will be brought to Justice Carr's Brooklyn home at 831 Carroll Street, and on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock a second requiem mass will be sung in St.Francis Xavier's Church. which he had long attended.
It is expected that the Justices of the Supreme Court in this department will be at the funeral in Brooklyn. and it is expected that further arrangements will be made by them today or tomorrow. The burial will be in Holy Cross Cemetery.
Brooklynite From Birth
William J. Carr was born in Brooklyn, October 10, 1862, and always resided here. He was a Brooklynite, first, last and always and was a firm believer that Brooklyn would at a not far distant day take its place as the foremost brought of the city in civic importance as well as in politics. He was the son of Cornelius and Mary (Gallagher) Carr.
He received his early education at the parochial school of the Roman Catholic Church of the Assumption and graduated in 1882 from the college of St. Francis Xavier with the degree of A.B. He was admitted to the Bar in September 1884 and was given the license to practice before the United States Supreme Court. He afterward attended the Augustinian College of Villanova, in Pennsylvania, and was honored with the decree of Doctor of Laws.
A Democrat politically, Mr. Carr's ability attracted the attention of his party leaders early in his career and he became a factor among the powers. of the old "Willoughby Street Faction", that waged battle against the last Senator McCarren. In 1891 he was appointed a clerk in the Supreme Court and in 1893-4 he was United States Commissioner in this district.
He was an assiduous student of the problems that confronted the courts, and the Bar in the interpretation of law and in his spare time he wrote many papers on legal subjects that attracted widespread attention. He also assisted in the compilations, of the American and English Encyclopedia.
As a practicing lawyer he won many notable legal victories, ans as Assistant Corporation counsel in Charge of Brooklyn. to which position he was appointed just after consolidation, he had chared of all the intricate legal work that has to be done in behalf of Brooklyn, Queens, and Richmond by reason of the consolidation. He won for the city the famous Hendricksol case, which disposed of millions of dollars worth of contracts which men attempted to foist on the city in the pre-consolidation scramble. He was Assistant Corporation Counsel here from 1898 to 1902 , and then he resumed private practice. He was a law partner of Edward M and Paul Grout, and i 1905 he became a partner in the law firm of Colonel William N. Dykman and John J. Kuhn.
In that capacity he conducted much lawmaking litigation for the Coney Island and Brooklyn railroad Company, the Brooklyn Union Gas Company and other large and important Brooklyn interest. His argument at Albany when the 80 cent gas bill was discussed was widely published and pronounced a master piece. Because of his wide knowledge of law and keen insight he was frequently appointed referee in important cases. and his opinions and reports commanded such respect that they were published in the annals of the Appellate Division.
Elected to Supreme court Bench in 1906
In the fall of 1906 he was elected to the Supreme Court and those who knew him paid tribute and congratulations by making him the guest of honor at many social functions and banquets. That he regared the position of a Justice of the Supreme Court as a grave and serious undertaking.laden with heavy responsibilities was shown when a dinner given in his honor at the Montauk Club shortly after he ascended to the bench. he said:
"No man can be a decent judge let alone a great judge if he does not realize that the sum of his knowledge compared tot he sum of all knowledge is as the drop of water to the earth's oceans".
As a justice of the Supreme Court he displayed such marked ability and aptitude for the interpretation of law and its application that less than three years after his election he was designated for the Applellate Division by Charles E. Hughes, who was then Governor of the State.
He carried his ideas with him to the Appellate Division where he applied himself so earnestly to the arduous work of that court that it was long the wonder of his associates how such a physically frail man could bear up under the tremendous strain. Yet, withe his days and nights to toll in the review of many cases, he found time to go among the people to accept many invitations to deliver addresses upon various topics,. His speeches and writings were intensely interesting no matter what the subject and he was widely read and quoted by other Judges. Hew as a lover of interesting and rare books and the private libray which he collected and kept at his home on Carroll st. is considered one of the ___________ in Brooklyn. Thorough ____ ____________ ___________ discussions __________ ________________ _____
the opinion that justice delayed was in many cases judges denied.
On top of the __________ and ___ of work, Justice Carr __ ___ shock in May ___ ____ ____ ____ sons brought him news that his life long friend Dr. Louis M. Dusseldorf had been seriously injured by an automobile which had belonged to the Carr Family. No member of the family was in the car and the responsibility seemed to rest with others. Nevertheless a lawsuite was directed against Justice Carr and when it was tried last November Justice Carr worried so much during the progress of the trial that his friends' and acquaintances noticed how much he too the matter to heart. He told his friends that it grieved him to see his friend so injured and marred for life, but he felt that he was no wise responsible and to his attorneys, former Judge Nathan L. Miller one of his former court associates and Frederick S. Martyn, he left the conduct of the defense and too no part in the trial except to give such testimony as was called for. Even when the jury exonerated him from blame he shook his head and said "My poor, dear friend".
On October 28, 1887, he was married to Miss Julia Fryer, Mrs. Carr died suddenly on February 24, 1917. He is survived by six children, Edward Q. Carr, Miss Mary Carr, Miss Margaret Carr, William J. Carr Jr. Miss Alicia Carr and Almet F. Carr.
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(Information Submitted by BKGenie)
William J. Carr
Associate Justice: 1911-1917
Born: October 10, 1862
Died: August 5, 1917
Speaking to graduates at the St. Francis Xavier's College 1901 commencement, Carr said: "There can be no true success at the expense of character. No wealth or power can compensate for lost ideals" (St. Francis).
Justice William J. Carr was born on October 10, 1862 in Brooklyn. He was educated at the Assumption Church parochial school and went on to earn an A.B. degree at St. Francis Xavier's College in 1882. He studied law at Villanova College and was admitted to the Bar in 1884.
In 1891, Carr was appointed a clerk of the Supreme Court. Beginning in 1894 he served as United States Commissioner in Brooklyn. He was later named Corporation Counsel for Brooklyn and Assistant Corporation Counsel of New York. In 1907, he was elected as a Justice of the Supreme Court for Kings County. Carr was appointed temporarily to the Appellate Division, Second Department by Gov. Charles E. Hughes in 1910. On January 7, 1911, Carr was officially designated as an Associate Justice by Gov. John Dix.
His memberships in civic and fraternal organizations included the Brooklyn Club, the Riding and Driving Club, the Montauk Club, and the Democratic Association for the Twenty-third Ward.
Carr was married to Julia M. Fryer in 1884 and had three sons and three daughters. He died on August 5, 1917, just six months after the death of his wife.
SOURCES
"Obituary 1 -- no Title." New York Times (1857-1922): 9. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times (1851-2007). Aug 06 1917. Web. 30 Sep. 2011 http://search.proquest.com/docview/99897788?accountid=8012.
"St. Francis Xavier's Graduating Exercises." New York Times (1857-1922): 7. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times (1851-2007). Jun 25 1901. Web. 30 Sep. 2011 http://search.proquest.com/docview/96108521?accountid=8012.
"William J. Carr." Biographical information sheets. Appellate Division, Second Department Library, Brooklyn.


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  • Created by: Anonymous
  • Added: 3 Nov 2013
  • Find a Grave Memorial 119752622
  • Find a Grave, database and images (www.findagrave.com/memorial/119752622/william-john-carr : accessed ), memorial page for Judge William John Carr (10 Oct 1862–5 Aug 1917), Find a Grave Memorial ID 119752622, citing Holy Cross Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA ; Maintained by Anonymous (contributor 46933945) .