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 John I. Deyell

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John I. Deyell

Birth
Drum, County Monaghan, Ireland
Death
21 Nov 1878 (aged 102–103)
Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada
Burial
Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada
Memorial ID
119427664 View Source


John Deyell - A Profile

By Norman McBain

The Deyell name has been traced back to the French Huguenots who were compelled to flee from Continental Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries because of religious persecution. The original spelling of the name was "Dalziel" and the use of that name continues in Scotland where some of the family migrated in those times of hardship. Another branch of the family went to Ireland where the name became changed to Deyell. Strangely enough, the earliest census rolls in Cavan Township shows not only the name of John Deyell but also that of Alexander Dalziel. It is noted that the early assessors and enumerators used their own judgement in spelling and the customary Deyell was sometimes written as Dyall or alternatively Dayall.

John and the "Iron Duke".

The Deyells of Ireland lived at Drum, County Monaghan, and it is known that the family consisted of three brothers: John, Robert and Samuel. As far as is known, John is the only one to have come to Canada. He first came in 1812 and fought against the Americans at Queenston Heights under General Brock. Surviving that war he returned with his regiment to Europe and fought at Waterloo in 1815 under the Duke of Wellington. An interesting sidelight reveals that a couple of his grandsons were named Wellington usually abbreviated to Wellie. No doubt this happened because of his high regard for the great Duke and the stories and legends of John's military service were passed on to his sons.

First Survey of Cavan

John Deyell was born at Drum, Ireland in 1775; and died in Cavan, November 21, 1878 - an amazing lifetime of 103 years. He married Margaret Lancashire and they came to settle in Canada in 1816 with their eldest son William. They were the first white settlers in what is now known as Cavan Township. He took up land on Lot 23, Concession 3, where he raised his family. His house, still in good repair, stands on this property on Highway 28. His wife, Margaret, who bore him five sons and four daughters, died in June 1866. Deyell assisted Mr. Willmot in making the first survey of Cavan and South Monaghan Townships and had the privilege of naming both these townships after the counties of the same name in his native land.

"Live and Let Live"

Deyell operated the first lodging house between Port Hope and Peterborough, called Centreville Hotel, owing no doubt to its being located just halfway between the two towns. Over the door of his inn he placed his personal motto: "Live and Let Live" which became his sobriquet. An earlier writer, in discussing the life of John Deyell, posed the interesting question, "What would people us if they named us according to our characteristics?"

First Schoolhouse

John donated an acre of his land for the first schoolhouse which later became the site of the present Centreville Presbyterian Church and Cemetery. He established the first grist mill in Millbrook - which gave the village its name: the Mill on the Brook. He is said to have procured a boulder from the field and had a stonemason dress it into a millstone. The story is told that John Deyell, wanting to buy a piece of land in Smith Township at Fowlers Corners, was informed that a neighbour was also interested in the same property. One day, seeing the neighbour drive past and suspecting that he was going to make the purchase, John hastened on foot cross-country to the corners, closed the deal and was leaving the property as the neighbour arrived. That property, being Lot 1, Concession 3, Township of Smith, remains in the Deyell name to this day.

John Deyell and his immediate family are, of course, long gone but the name goes on in his grandchildren and succeeding generations. There are still Deyell settlements in all the townships in which John's children settled and, over the years, his descendants have, no doubt, scattered over the entire continent, if not beyond. As a society dedicated to preserving our heritage, we can all be proud to claim John Deyell as our earliest pioneer and to share this pride with his descendants.

A Memorial Window

An appropriate stained glass window at the west end of Centreville Presbyterian Church, facing the doors by which the worshippers enter, is a memorial to John Deyell and his wife, Margaret Lancashire. Installed by his descendants, to dedicate the memory of his toil, friendship and the hardships of pioneer life. Depicted in its richly coloured panels are motifs of an early pioneer farm and various household articles, among them the Holy Bible, which the early settlers brought with them to their new land.


John Deyell - A Profile

By Norman McBain

The Deyell name has been traced back to the French Huguenots who were compelled to flee from Continental Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries because of religious persecution. The original spelling of the name was "Dalziel" and the use of that name continues in Scotland where some of the family migrated in those times of hardship. Another branch of the family went to Ireland where the name became changed to Deyell. Strangely enough, the earliest census rolls in Cavan Township shows not only the name of John Deyell but also that of Alexander Dalziel. It is noted that the early assessors and enumerators used their own judgement in spelling and the customary Deyell was sometimes written as Dyall or alternatively Dayall.

John and the "Iron Duke".

The Deyells of Ireland lived at Drum, County Monaghan, and it is known that the family consisted of three brothers: John, Robert and Samuel. As far as is known, John is the only one to have come to Canada. He first came in 1812 and fought against the Americans at Queenston Heights under General Brock. Surviving that war he returned with his regiment to Europe and fought at Waterloo in 1815 under the Duke of Wellington. An interesting sidelight reveals that a couple of his grandsons were named Wellington usually abbreviated to Wellie. No doubt this happened because of his high regard for the great Duke and the stories and legends of John's military service were passed on to his sons.

First Survey of Cavan

John Deyell was born at Drum, Ireland in 1775; and died in Cavan, November 21, 1878 - an amazing lifetime of 103 years. He married Margaret Lancashire and they came to settle in Canada in 1816 with their eldest son William. They were the first white settlers in what is now known as Cavan Township. He took up land on Lot 23, Concession 3, where he raised his family. His house, still in good repair, stands on this property on Highway 28. His wife, Margaret, who bore him five sons and four daughters, died in June 1866. Deyell assisted Mr. Willmot in making the first survey of Cavan and South Monaghan Townships and had the privilege of naming both these townships after the counties of the same name in his native land.

"Live and Let Live"

Deyell operated the first lodging house between Port Hope and Peterborough, called Centreville Hotel, owing no doubt to its being located just halfway between the two towns. Over the door of his inn he placed his personal motto: "Live and Let Live" which became his sobriquet. An earlier writer, in discussing the life of John Deyell, posed the interesting question, "What would people us if they named us according to our characteristics?"

First Schoolhouse

John donated an acre of his land for the first schoolhouse which later became the site of the present Centreville Presbyterian Church and Cemetery. He established the first grist mill in Millbrook - which gave the village its name: the Mill on the Brook. He is said to have procured a boulder from the field and had a stonemason dress it into a millstone. The story is told that John Deyell, wanting to buy a piece of land in Smith Township at Fowlers Corners, was informed that a neighbour was also interested in the same property. One day, seeing the neighbour drive past and suspecting that he was going to make the purchase, John hastened on foot cross-country to the corners, closed the deal and was leaving the property as the neighbour arrived. That property, being Lot 1, Concession 3, Township of Smith, remains in the Deyell name to this day.

John Deyell and his immediate family are, of course, long gone but the name goes on in his grandchildren and succeeding generations. There are still Deyell settlements in all the townships in which John's children settled and, over the years, his descendants have, no doubt, scattered over the entire continent, if not beyond. As a society dedicated to preserving our heritage, we can all be proud to claim John Deyell as our earliest pioneer and to share this pride with his descendants.

A Memorial Window

An appropriate stained glass window at the west end of Centreville Presbyterian Church, facing the doors by which the worshippers enter, is a memorial to John Deyell and his wife, Margaret Lancashire. Installed by his descendants, to dedicate the memory of his toil, friendship and the hardships of pioneer life. Depicted in its richly coloured panels are motifs of an early pioneer farm and various household articles, among them the Holy Bible, which the early settlers brought with them to their new land.


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  • Created by: John Leistra
  • Added: 28 Oct 2013
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 119427664
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/119427664/john-i-deyell: accessed ), memorial page for John I. Deyell (1775–21 Nov 1878), Find a Grave Memorial ID 119427664, citing Centreville Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada; Maintained by John Leistra (contributor 48237929).