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William Meek Furr

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William Meek Furr

Birth
Concord, Cabarrus County, North Carolina, USA
Death
23 Dec 1906 (aged 66)
Toccopola, Pontotoc County, Mississippi, USA
Burial
Lafayette County, Mississippi, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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A SAD CHRISTMAS

W.M. Furr, a Leading Citizen of this County, Suddenly Expires While His Home is Being Reduced to Ashes

Toccopola was the scene of an awful and distressing double calamity on Saturday night December 23, plunging the entire community in grief -- a sorrow shared by friends far and near, Pontotoc being conspicuous among the number of sympathizers.

On the date above mentioned, Mr. Wm. M. Furr's residence, a large two-story frame building, was discovered by one of the family to be on fire, having started from a fire-place in an up-stairs bedroom. When found, the fire had gained such headway that it was impossible to save the dwelling, although heroic effort was made. In spite of the cruel, greedy flames, considerable of the furniture and general contents were carried out. Calmly and collectedly, Mr. Furr had given instructions to the workers and had himself assisted in the removing of the household effects without any visible signs of fatigue or exhaustion. Suddenly, while helping to unlock a bedstead, he fell dead in the arms of a son who had just remarked, "It is getting too hot; we had better get out." It is not known whether death was due to excitement, distress, rupture of a blood vessel, or heart failure -- it might easily be attributed to any of these causes. The shock was great and almost beyond comprehension, making the material loss made by the fire sink into insignificance. Either misfortune wuld [sic] have been almost unbearable but two coming simultaneously, is crushing and the very thought of which strikes horror to the hearts of even those who are bound only by ties of friendship. God alone knows the anguish of wife, children and other loved ones. To each one, The Sentinel goes our in tenderest sympathy.

William M. Furr was born in North Carolina Nov 21, 1840. Coming to this state when a boy, he settled in Toccopola, since which time he has been closely identified with that place, a prominent, public spirited citizen. His life is an open book all may read -- pages of merrit [sic] and true worth -- chapters of a useful, well spent life, the finale reflecting a life without a blot or blemish. He was a model man, filling every position with a true regard for charity, honesty and fair dealing with his fellow man.

For many years a consistent and zealous member of the Methodist church, he was serving as superintendent of that Sunday school at the time of his death. He was also a loyal Mason and loved the beautiful principles taught by that ancient fraternity.

As a Confederate soldier, his career is an honorable one, a credit to his family and to his country for which he fought. Enlisting August 1861 in Company "E" 19th Miss. Regt., Anderson's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, he served continuously until the surrender at Appomattox Court House in 1865.

Always interested in churches and schools, and realizing what they meant to the advancement and betterment of humanity, Mr. Furr was a liberal contributor to their establishment and support. [All 11 of his sons and daughters attended college!] He was a successful financier and for twenty-five years was a leading merchant in his town, doing a large, profitable business, and leaving a good estate. Since the Merchants & Farmers Bank was first established here, he has been one of the directors and his clear judgment and quick intuition will be greatly missed.

He was married to a Miss Pickens when quite a young man, the noble life partner of his joys and sorrows surviving. Eleven children blessed this union, ten of whom are left to mourn the loss of a good and wise father, who did his whole duty to them, inculcating right principles and giving each the advantage of an education. Two sons were off at college when the tragedy occurred, Marvin at Chicago and Esta at Atlanta. Both were wired and reached home just in time to attend their father's funeral which occurred at Lebanon cemetery Christmas day. A very large assemblage of relatives, neighbors and friends from other communities were present to pay their last tribute of respect to the honored and lamented dead. Revs. Hugh Edmondson and J. R. Roberson conducted the sad and impressive funeral service in a tender, touching manner felt by the entire gathering whose hearts were already surcharged with sympathy for the distressed family.

Potomac Sentinel (Mississippi), 1906
A SAD CHRISTMAS

W.M. Furr, a Leading Citizen of this County, Suddenly Expires While His Home is Being Reduced to Ashes

Toccopola was the scene of an awful and distressing double calamity on Saturday night December 23, plunging the entire community in grief -- a sorrow shared by friends far and near, Pontotoc being conspicuous among the number of sympathizers.

On the date above mentioned, Mr. Wm. M. Furr's residence, a large two-story frame building, was discovered by one of the family to be on fire, having started from a fire-place in an up-stairs bedroom. When found, the fire had gained such headway that it was impossible to save the dwelling, although heroic effort was made. In spite of the cruel, greedy flames, considerable of the furniture and general contents were carried out. Calmly and collectedly, Mr. Furr had given instructions to the workers and had himself assisted in the removing of the household effects without any visible signs of fatigue or exhaustion. Suddenly, while helping to unlock a bedstead, he fell dead in the arms of a son who had just remarked, "It is getting too hot; we had better get out." It is not known whether death was due to excitement, distress, rupture of a blood vessel, or heart failure -- it might easily be attributed to any of these causes. The shock was great and almost beyond comprehension, making the material loss made by the fire sink into insignificance. Either misfortune wuld [sic] have been almost unbearable but two coming simultaneously, is crushing and the very thought of which strikes horror to the hearts of even those who are bound only by ties of friendship. God alone knows the anguish of wife, children and other loved ones. To each one, The Sentinel goes our in tenderest sympathy.

William M. Furr was born in North Carolina Nov 21, 1840. Coming to this state when a boy, he settled in Toccopola, since which time he has been closely identified with that place, a prominent, public spirited citizen. His life is an open book all may read -- pages of merrit [sic] and true worth -- chapters of a useful, well spent life, the finale reflecting a life without a blot or blemish. He was a model man, filling every position with a true regard for charity, honesty and fair dealing with his fellow man.

For many years a consistent and zealous member of the Methodist church, he was serving as superintendent of that Sunday school at the time of his death. He was also a loyal Mason and loved the beautiful principles taught by that ancient fraternity.

As a Confederate soldier, his career is an honorable one, a credit to his family and to his country for which he fought. Enlisting August 1861 in Company "E" 19th Miss. Regt., Anderson's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, he served continuously until the surrender at Appomattox Court House in 1865.

Always interested in churches and schools, and realizing what they meant to the advancement and betterment of humanity, Mr. Furr was a liberal contributor to their establishment and support. [All 11 of his sons and daughters attended college!] He was a successful financier and for twenty-five years was a leading merchant in his town, doing a large, profitable business, and leaving a good estate. Since the Merchants & Farmers Bank was first established here, he has been one of the directors and his clear judgment and quick intuition will be greatly missed.

He was married to a Miss Pickens when quite a young man, the noble life partner of his joys and sorrows surviving. Eleven children blessed this union, ten of whom are left to mourn the loss of a good and wise father, who did his whole duty to them, inculcating right principles and giving each the advantage of an education. Two sons were off at college when the tragedy occurred, Marvin at Chicago and Esta at Atlanta. Both were wired and reached home just in time to attend their father's funeral which occurred at Lebanon cemetery Christmas day. A very large assemblage of relatives, neighbors and friends from other communities were present to pay their last tribute of respect to the honored and lamented dead. Revs. Hugh Edmondson and J. R. Roberson conducted the sad and impressive funeral service in a tender, touching manner felt by the entire gathering whose hearts were already surcharged with sympathy for the distressed family.

Potomac Sentinel (Mississippi), 1906

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