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Edmund Clare Fitzhugh

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Edmund Clare Fitzhugh

Birth
Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia, USA
Death
24 Nov 1883 (aged 64–65)
San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Born on the Fitzhugh family plantation Bascobel. It was built in about 1752 and was an eleven room mansion, which burned in the early 1900's.
Parents were Dr. Alexander Fitzhugh and his first wife Eliza Gibbs Clare.
He went to California during the era of the gold rush, but spent the majority of his early adult years in Washington Territory.
He had quite a lucrative career the years he was in Washington Territory. He was in the coal industry and at one time had the largest employee number in that industry in the northwest. He also served as an Indian agent in Bellingham, Washington in 1857. With his law background he also served as a Judge in the U.S. District Court.
While in the Bellingham area he married by Indian custom, E-you-alth, the daughter of Chief Sehome, of the Samish tribe. They would have one daughter, Julia Ann Sehome Reid Fitzhugh. He would then take as a second wife Xswelas (Mary) who was E-you-alth's aunt, a sister of Chief Sehome. They would have two sons, Charles Mason and Julius. Eventually he would desert his families, but taking his daughter with him as far as Seattle. It is said that he placed her there with some people who raised her.
Very early at at the start of the Civil War he married Cora Bowie in Maryland on 15 May 1861. Why exactly he took her and returned to the Pacific Northwest is not known. She died on Whidbey Island in 1862. Whether it was grief or the war that made him return east is not known. However, in his prior years in the Bellingham area he became acquainted with George E. Pickett who was serving in the Confederate military. Pickett also had an Indian wife, so it may have been through those connections they got to know each other well. When the south left the union he resigned and went back to join the Confederates. That is what Fitzhugh did, joined and served on the staff of General Pickett as a Major. He was in fact Pickett's adjutant at Gettysburg.
In the twilight of the Civil War he again married in December 1864 Annie Grayson. He would stay with her for a time and they would have four children: Cora Bowie (named in memory of his wife who died), Mary (who married Arthur Conover Thomson), Alexander and Margaretta.
Eventually he took his family to Iowa for a time (this is where Alexander and Margarett were born.) However, true to form he deserted this family, returning to San Francisco.
It was there that he was found dead of apoplexy in a seedy hotel room. By this time he had lost everything.
Not a clue as to where he was buried. Quite possibly in a paupers grave in the San Francisco area.
.........
Born on the Fitzhugh family plantation Bascobel. It was built in about 1752 and was an eleven room mansion, which burned in the early 1900's.
Parents were Dr. Alexander Fitzhugh and his first wife Eliza Gibbs Clare.
He went to California during the era of the gold rush, but spent the majority of his early adult years in Washington Territory.
He had quite a lucrative career the years he was in Washington Territory. He was in the coal industry and at one time had the largest employee number in that industry in the northwest. He also served as an Indian agent in Bellingham, Washington in 1857. With his law background he also served as a Judge in the U.S. District Court.
While in the Bellingham area he married by Indian custom, E-you-alth, the daughter of Chief Sehome, of the Samish tribe. They would have one daughter, Julia Ann Sehome Reid Fitzhugh. He would then take as a second wife Xswelas (Mary) who was E-you-alth's aunt, a sister of Chief Sehome. They would have two sons, Charles Mason and Julius. Eventually he would desert his families, but taking his daughter with him as far as Seattle. It is said that he placed her there with some people who raised her.
Very early at at the start of the Civil War he married Cora Bowie in Maryland on 15 May 1861. Why exactly he took her and returned to the Pacific Northwest is not known. She died on Whidbey Island in 1862. Whether it was grief or the war that made him return east is not known. However, in his prior years in the Bellingham area he became acquainted with George E. Pickett who was serving in the Confederate military. Pickett also had an Indian wife, so it may have been through those connections they got to know each other well. When the south left the union he resigned and went back to join the Confederates. That is what Fitzhugh did, joined and served on the staff of General Pickett as a Major. He was in fact Pickett's adjutant at Gettysburg.
In the twilight of the Civil War he again married in December 1864 Annie Grayson. He would stay with her for a time and they would have four children: Cora Bowie (named in memory of his wife who died), Mary (who married Arthur Conover Thomson), Alexander and Margaretta.
Eventually he took his family to Iowa for a time (this is where Alexander and Margarett were born.) However, true to form he deserted this family, returning to San Francisco.
It was there that he was found dead of apoplexy in a seedy hotel room. By this time he had lost everything.
Not a clue as to where he was buried. Quite possibly in a paupers grave in the San Francisco area.
.........

Gravesite Details

No doubt buried in San Francisco; in unmarked grave.



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