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Capt. James Gustavus “Tabby” Rogers

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Capt. James Gustavus “Tabby” Rogers Veteran

Birth
Georgia, USA
Death
17 Sep 1862 (aged 35)
Maryland, USA
Burial
Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Capt. James Gustavas Rogers was born in Darian, Georgia, April 29, 1837. When quite a lad his parents moved to Macon, Ga, which continued to be his home till he died except a few years spent in Savannah and upper Georgia. At the age of 15, he was converted to God and joined the M.E. Church: he was an active and zealous member, in the relations of S. S. Superintendent, Class Leader and Local Preacher- he loved "to go about doing good". Brother Rogers was a patriot, as well as a Christian.

Early in our national struggle he raised a Company, entered the Confederate service as Captain of the Central City Blues of the immortal 19th Georgia: and as a true soldier, he shared all the privations and hardships of his Regiment. In their eventful history, without complaint, but with a cheerful and buoyant spirit. He was in seventeen hard fought battles and escaped unhurt till the fatal Sharpsburg. He commanded the Regiment in several engagements and was in command when he fell. Wearied and fatigued with the investment of Harper's Ferry, and the march to the battle field of Sharpsburg, his men lay on their arms for 24 hours, expecting the attack which the enemy made at day dawn of the memorable 17th of September. The conflict was terrible, and for one hour as if regardless of danger, did Capt. Rogers pass up and down the line of his Regiment, cheering on his men

Part of Trimble's Brigade, the 12th Georgia held part of Jackson's line in front of the Dunker Church during the morning Union attacks at Antietam. Captain James Rodgers, commanding the 12th, was struck dead by bullets that hit his hand, thigh, and head. This battle flag of the 12th Georgia includes the names of several color bearers who were killed during the tremendous fighting on the morning of September 17, 1862.

PICTURES at right; His Sword made by William J. McElroy & Co., Macon, Georgia.
Capt. James Gustavas Rogers was born in Darian, Georgia, April 29, 1837. When quite a lad his parents moved to Macon, Ga, which continued to be his home till he died except a few years spent in Savannah and upper Georgia. At the age of 15, he was converted to God and joined the M.E. Church: he was an active and zealous member, in the relations of S. S. Superintendent, Class Leader and Local Preacher- he loved "to go about doing good". Brother Rogers was a patriot, as well as a Christian.

Early in our national struggle he raised a Company, entered the Confederate service as Captain of the Central City Blues of the immortal 19th Georgia: and as a true soldier, he shared all the privations and hardships of his Regiment. In their eventful history, without complaint, but with a cheerful and buoyant spirit. He was in seventeen hard fought battles and escaped unhurt till the fatal Sharpsburg. He commanded the Regiment in several engagements and was in command when he fell. Wearied and fatigued with the investment of Harper's Ferry, and the march to the battle field of Sharpsburg, his men lay on their arms for 24 hours, expecting the attack which the enemy made at day dawn of the memorable 17th of September. The conflict was terrible, and for one hour as if regardless of danger, did Capt. Rogers pass up and down the line of his Regiment, cheering on his men

Part of Trimble's Brigade, the 12th Georgia held part of Jackson's line in front of the Dunker Church during the morning Union attacks at Antietam. Captain James Rodgers, commanding the 12th, was struck dead by bullets that hit his hand, thigh, and head. This battle flag of the 12th Georgia includes the names of several color bearers who were killed during the tremendous fighting on the morning of September 17, 1862.

PICTURES at right; His Sword made by William J. McElroy & Co., Macon, Georgia.

Gravesite Details

Note: JG Rogers is not listed among the Confederate dead buried in the Washington Confederate Cemetery in Hagerstown. According to an October 23, 1862 newspaper account, "[h]e was buried in an unmarked grave on the battlefield."



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