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Pvt Anderson Bell

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Pvt Anderson Bell

Birth
Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi, USA
Death
25 Feb 1903 (aged 64)
Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA
Burial
Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA
Memorial ID
11587563 View Source

Private Anderson Bell was born into slavery on March 9, 1838 on a plantation near Jackson, Mississippi. Joining the US Army in Missouri in March 1863, he was an infantryman in Company B of the segregated 57th Regiment during the Civil War. This unit served in Arkansas throughout the war, around Little Rock, Duvall's Bluff, and Ft. Smith. They stayed in Ft. Smith for 18 months afterwards, and Bell left the Army in December 1866.

After living in Iowa for more than a decade, Bell came to Omaha in the 1870s. In 1880, his horse was killed by the Omaha City Marshall for having a disease called glanders. In 1895, the newspaper reported Anderson Bell started receiving a pension from the US government for his military service. In 1901, he was featured in the paper when he and another ex-slave named John Alexander got together and talked about slavery and the Civil War. They were arranging for their children to get married when they told the judge they had both fought in the war. Bell said he lived on a plantation in Mississippi and he was the property of "Colonel Bell." The judge reported the story to the Omaha World-Herald and they published it.

According to the Omaha Bee, Anderson Bell lived at 9th and Fort Street when he died on February 24, 1903. His daughter Edith, who he took to the judge to get married in 1901, died just a year earlier.

He was buried in the Civil War section of Forest Lawn, with his gravestone shown here.

Private Anderson Bell was born into slavery on March 9, 1838 on a plantation near Jackson, Mississippi. Joining the US Army in Missouri in March 1863, he was an infantryman in Company B of the segregated 57th Regiment during the Civil War. This unit served in Arkansas throughout the war, around Little Rock, Duvall's Bluff, and Ft. Smith. They stayed in Ft. Smith for 18 months afterwards, and Bell left the Army in December 1866.

After living in Iowa for more than a decade, Bell came to Omaha in the 1870s. In 1880, his horse was killed by the Omaha City Marshall for having a disease called glanders. In 1895, the newspaper reported Anderson Bell started receiving a pension from the US government for his military service. In 1901, he was featured in the paper when he and another ex-slave named John Alexander got together and talked about slavery and the Civil War. They were arranging for their children to get married when they told the judge they had both fought in the war. Bell said he lived on a plantation in Mississippi and he was the property of "Colonel Bell." The judge reported the story to the Omaha World-Herald and they published it.

According to the Omaha Bee, Anderson Bell lived at 9th and Fort Street when he died on February 24, 1903. His daughter Edith, who he took to the judge to get married in 1901, died just a year earlier.

He was buried in the Civil War section of Forest Lawn, with his gravestone shown here.


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