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Thomas Henry Hodo

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Thomas Henry Hodo

Birth
Warren County, Georgia, USA
Death
7 Jul 1865 (aged 38)
Goldsboro, Wayne County, North Carolina, USA
Burial
Goldsboro, Wayne County, North Carolina, USA GPS-Latitude: 35.3755556, Longitude: -77.9955556
Plot
Confederate Memorial
Memorial ID
View Source
Company D - 41st Alabama Infantry CSA.

Thomas Henry Hodo was born October 8, 1826 in Warren County, Ga. and was the son of Baldwin Hutcherson Hodo, and grandson of Peter Hodo(son). He moved his family to Pickens County, Alabama sometime in the early 1850's. He joined the 41st Alabama Infantry and was a private in company "D". Companies C and D were formed in Pickens County and were known as the "Pickens Grays". They left for war from Pickensville on May 6, 1862. He was the eldest of five brothers who fought for the Confederacy.

Thomas died in November of 1865 in Goldsboro, North Carolina. According to records, he had been wounded and was sent to a hospital in Richmond. While recovering, the hospital was captured and he was held as a prisoner. I am not for sure how he ended up in Goldsboro, he might have been sent there. At any rate, he was in very bad health. A good friend and fellow soldier, E.C. Roper, brought him to the F.A. Patrick home in Goldsboro around the 20th of June. Thomas died on the 7th of July and was buried in the community cemetery in Goldsboro.
Company D - 41st Alabama Infantry CSA.

Thomas Henry Hodo was born October 8, 1826 in Warren County, Ga. and was the son of Baldwin Hutcherson Hodo, and grandson of Peter Hodo(son). He moved his family to Pickens County, Alabama sometime in the early 1850's. He joined the 41st Alabama Infantry and was a private in company "D". Companies C and D were formed in Pickens County and were known as the "Pickens Grays". They left for war from Pickensville on May 6, 1862. He was the eldest of five brothers who fought for the Confederacy.

Thomas died in November of 1865 in Goldsboro, North Carolina. According to records, he had been wounded and was sent to a hospital in Richmond. While recovering, the hospital was captured and he was held as a prisoner. I am not for sure how he ended up in Goldsboro, he might have been sent there. At any rate, he was in very bad health. A good friend and fellow soldier, E.C. Roper, brought him to the F.A. Patrick home in Goldsboro around the 20th of June. Thomas died on the 7th of July and was buried in the community cemetery in Goldsboro.


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