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 Nathan King

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Nathan King

  • Birth 23 Sep 1846 Madison County, Indiana, USA
  • Death 19 Sep 1918 Wabash County, Indiana, USA
  • Burial Lincolnville, Wabash County, Indiana, USA
  • Memorial ID 11510316

NATHAN KING. There are few better known men in Lagro township than the popular old blacksmith and stanch Democrat, Nathan King. Mr. King is the type of hard-working and honorable citizen who is a pillar of society in every community, who can always be depended upon and whose business and civic activities and private life are alike above reproach. He has, for so many years that only the older citizens can remember the beginning, conducted a shop at the village of Dora, and is also owner of sixty-five acres of land situated in two tracts in Lagro township.

Nathan King is a son of Willliam and Nancy Ann (Owens) King, both of whom were born in North Carolina, but were married in Indiana. William had a first wife whom he married in North Carolina, and she died in Madison county, Indiana. The children of that union were: William, David, Cornelius, George W., Daniel, Thomas, Jesse and Polly, all of whom are now deceased. Miss Owens, his second wife, came to Indiana when quite young with her parents, James Owens and wife, who located in Madison county. To this second union were born the following children: Richard, Lydia Ann, John W., James, Elizabeth, Nathan, Elisha and Henrietta. All are now deceased except Nathan and Elisha, who is a farmer in Jay county.

Nathan King was born on his father's farm in Madison county, Indiana, September 23, 1846. Mr. King is one of the comparatively few men still in active life who received at least a portion of their schooling in one of the old-fashioned and primitive log cabins which were the predecessors of the little red schoolhouse. The schoolhouse in which he learned his first lessons had a puncheon floor, and the benches on which the scholars sat were slabs smoothed off on one side, and were supported from the floor by pins driven into the underside. There were other primitive facilities with which he was familiar, such as the old-fashioned goose-quill pen, made by the teacher, and the curriculum consisted of the familiar three R's. He was about fifteen years of age when the family moved to Wabash county, and at Dora in July of the year he celebrated his twentieth birthday he started to learn the blacksmith's trade under James Fulton. The shop changed hands several times, but in about five years from the time the young apprentice stared to learn his trade he had acquired ownership of the establishment, and each year from that time has found him at his anvil and forge, and the merry clink of his hammer shows that the village blacksmith is always busy. For a couple of years his son, H.W., was with him, but during most of the time he has worked alone, and his skillful services have so long been offered the people of this community that they are depended upon almost as a permanent institution.

After the death of his mother, Nathan King bought out the interest of the other heirs in the old farm, and has since been its owner, his son Joseph now running it. On Christmas Day of 1868, Mr. King married Anzeletta Holdren. To their union have been born twelve children, five of whom died young and the others are mentioned briefly as follows: Mrs. Daisy Huston, who is the mother of two children, Arnold and Florence; Amanda E., the wife of Harry Scully; William Otto, who was a bright and popular young man, went west on account of his health, and died at the age of thirty in California; Joseph, who is manager of the farm; Hubert, who married Grace Lenol; Iva May, who married Loren Sayer, and has one child, Maxine; Kizzie, the wife of James Adams, and the mother of one child, Virginia.

Mrs. King was born in Blackford county, Indiana, a daughter of Joseph C. and Mary (Hewett) Holdren. Her father, Joseph, was a carpenter and also a schoolmaster, was born in Pennsylvania, married I that state, and was the son of the one-time owner of the Hocking Valley Coal Mines. Joseph Holdren died at Andrews, Huntington county, and his wife passed away in the city of Marion. There were twelve children in the Holdren household, as follows: Loretto; Mary Ann; Josephine; Anzeletta; Olive, deceased; Susanna; Elizabeth; Nancy, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Mildred; Joseph, and Washington. Mrs. King came to Wabash county with her parents when eight years old, and her father later traded his farm for one near Andrew in Huntington county. Like her husband, Mrs. King received her education in a little log schoolhouse. Both have witnessed the tremendous changes which five or six decades have introduced into all parts of the county, and as prosperous people who have done their duty to society and to their children they have a pleasing retrospect upon the past. They reside in a comfortable home near the shop.

Nathan King has been a lifelong democrat. He began voting during the years following the close of the Civil war and has long been regarded as one of the most influential party workers in Wabash county. In all these years he has never asked for an office, but could always be depended upon to support the ticket and his influence has again and again counted for the election of his friends. He and his family are members of the Christian church.

Source: - Weesner, Clarkson W., History of Wabash County, Indiana. Chicago: Lewis, 1914, pp. 908-909.


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  • Created by: Travis LeMaster
  • Added: 10 Aug 2005
  • Find A Grave Memorial 11510316
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Nathan King (23 Sep 1846–19 Sep 1918), Find A Grave Memorial no. 11510316, citing Center Grove Cemetery, Lincolnville, Wabash County, Indiana, USA ; Maintained by Travis LeMaster (contributor 46799461) .