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Col William Spurgin

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Col William Spurgin

Birth
Frederick County, Maryland, USA
Death
13 Aug 1806 (aged 72)
Ontario, Canada
Burial
Burial Details Unknown, Specifically: No records
Memorial ID
113233665 View Source

5. COLONEL, WILLIAM SPURGIN, ESQUIRE was born June 06, 1734 in Fredericks County, Maryland, and died August 13, 1806 in Charlottesville, Ontario Province, Canada. He married (1) MARY JANE WELBORN or SELLERS Abt. 1752 in Maryland or Virginia, daughter of JOHN WELBORN and ANN CRABTREE. She was born June 20, 1736 in Chatham County, Maryland, and died August 03, 1803 in Rowan County, North Carolina. He married (2) ANN Bedsaul Reddick Abt. 1787 in Virginia/Pennsylvania. She was born in Virginia/Pennsylvania.

Notes for COLONEL, WILLIAM SPURGIN, ESQUIRE:
From "Pathfinders Past and Present, a History of Davidson County, North Carolina" p. 15:

"Abbots Creek Settlement

From gravestones and other records, it appears that the first settlers of the Abbots Creek community were English, Welsh, Irish and German. The earliest deeds were dated around 1758 but it is known that several families were living in this community some years before that date.
One of the first settlers was William Spurgeon in possession of whose family today are some interesting documents relating to his life. Of a noted Spurgeon family in England, he had come from the Maryland side of the Potomac early in the 1750's to fertile land on the headwaters of Abbots Creek. There he purchased a large acreage, persuaded his brother John and Mother to come and buy a plantation near his, and became an influential figure in the county. He was one of the first Justices of Rowan County. His family, too, as other chapters will show, played important roles in later years. In Volume I of the Moravian Records it is noted that [the early part of the year 1767 was marked by a good deal of missionary work on the part of Richard Uttley, English minister of Wachovia.] Frequently on Saturday a messenger would arrive from one of the adjacent settlements and would take Br. Uttly back to preach for them on the following Sunday. Among the places mentioned more or less frequently was Justice William Sporgin's (sic) house on Abbots Creek..."{1}
During the turmoil of the French and Indian War, William sold his father's property at Packhorse Ford on the headwaters of the Potomac River and on the west side of the Shenandoah River. William, his wife Mary Jane, mother Mary, and brothers, John and Samuel moved near Abbott's Creek, North Carolina.
William bought 310 acres from John Fullerlane on October 2, 1759. From July 6, 1771 on through August of 1772, William buys and sells properties and gives property to the Welborn family, suggesting relationship of the Welborn's to William's family.{2} Some researchers of the Welborn family claim Mary Jane's maiden name to be Welborn, and because of the above described buying and selling, many of the Spurgeon researchers believe Mary Jane Sellers maiden name to be Welborn. Son Joseph Spurgin stated that his mother's name before marrying William was Mary Jane Sellers, so she very possibly was married previously to a Mr. Sellers or Sellers could have been her maiden name.
From the earliest surviving Rowan County court records, William appears as Justice of the Peace of that county from1764 to 1775.{3} He had full judicial, executive and legislative powers in his jurisdiction. Family sources say, the "first court ever held in Rowan County was under an oak tree, and William Spurgin was a Justice of the Peace under King George III, and helped hold that court".{4} No Doubt, William received a good education (probably a credit to his parents) before arriving in North Carolina.
On January 10, 1776, William and other Justices were directed by Governor Josiah Martin "to erect the King's standards to raise, levy, muster , and array in arms all his Majesty's loyal and Faithful subjects within your respective counties..." {5} America's revolt against England had begun. William did as he was commissioned. He fought with Boyd's Provincials of North Carolina, and in North Carolina, the fighting was described as, "bands of Whigs and Tories raiding each others areas, plundering, burning and killing. Whatever their origin, whoever their leaders, civil war was being fought in the Carolinas. Bloody combats and bitter violent brutal fighting flared from both sides with quarter unknown."{6}
In late 1778, the British sailed onto the South Carolina and Georga coast. There were British, Hessians and Tory units. The Tory units were under Lt. Col. Archibald Cambell. They landed at Tybee Island at the mouth of the Savannah River. As this occurred, British General Augustive Prevost moved up the coast from British Florida with his command. American General Robert Howe tried to stop the union of the two units to no avail. By January of 1779, the British had captured Sunbury, Georgia and all of the Savannah River up to Augusta.{7}

From Wikipedia Encyclopedia on the internet:
"The British began their "southern strategy" by sending expeditions from New York City and Saint Augustine, East Florida to capture Savannah, Georgia late in 1778. The New York expedition, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Campbell, arrived first, and successfully captured the town on December 29, 1778.
[edit] British recruitment
When Brigadier General Augustine Prevost arrived from Saint Augustine in mid-January, he assumed command of the garrison there, and sent Campbell on an expedition to take control of Augusta and raise Loyalist militia companies.
Leaving Savannah on January 24, Campbell and more than 1,000 men arrived near Augusta a week later, with only minimal harassment from Georgia Patriot militia on the way. Augusta had been defended by South Carolina General Andrew Williamson leading about 1,000 militia from Georgia and South Carolina, but he withdrew most of his men when Campbell approached. This rear guard skirmished with Campbell's men before withdrawing across the Savannah River into South Carolina.[2]
Campbell then began recruiting Loyalists. About 1,100 men signed up, but relatively few actually formed militia companies. Campbell then began requiring oaths of loyalty, on pain of forfeiture of property; many took this oath insincerely, quickly letting Williamson know their true feelings. An expedition by James Boyd went all the way into North Carolina, where he met with success, and recruited several hundred men. As he traveled south back toward Augusta, more Loyalists joined his company, until it numbered over 600 men in central South Carolina. As this column moved on, the men plundered and pillaged along the way, predictably drawing angered Patriot supporters to take up arms.
South Carolina militia Colonel Andrew Pickens raised 350 men and headed toward Augusta to join Williamson. When he learned of Boyd's passage through Ninety Six, he moved to intercept before Boyd could reach Savannah. Boyd reached Cherokee Ford, where eight Patriots with small swivel guns in an entrenched position repulsed Boyd's approach. Boyd moved north about 5 miles (8.0 km) and crossed the river there. Pickens crossed into Georgia after Boyd, and began following him toward Augusta. On February 14, he caught up with Boyd when he was encamped near Kettle Creek.
[edit] Battle
Boyd was apparently unaware that he was being followed so closely, and his camp, while guards were posted, was not particularly alert. Pickens advanced, leading the center, while his left flank was under the command of Elijah Clarke and the right was under John Dooly. Gunfire between Patriot scouts and the camp guards alerted Boyd to the situation, who managed to form a defensive position atop a hill, and surprise Pickens. Flanking maneuvers by Clarke and Dooly were slowed by the swampy conditions, so they did not immediately arrive on the battlefield."
Things at first went badly for Pickens, but then a lucky musket shot hit Boyd, mortally wounding him, and the Patriot flanks began to emerge from the swamps. The Loyalists, led by Boyd's second in command, William Spurgen, fell back, but the disorganized retreat rapidly became a rout. {7a}

From "Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution", by Lorenzo Sabine (Boston: Little, Brown& Company, 1864), "Boyd", page246, "Spurgeon", page 325:
"Boyd, -----, Of Carolina. Colonel, and in command of a corps of Tories, who were robbers rather than soldiers. What they could not consume or carry off, they burned. Boyd himself was bold, enterprising, and famed for his dishonesty. He had a conference with Sir Henry Clinton at New York, and planned an insurrection in the back part of South Carolina, to be executed as soon as the Royal Army should obtain possession of Savannah. In 1779, at the head of eight hundred men, he passed through the district of Ninety-Six on his way to Georga, and destroyed life and property by sword and fire, along his whole route. In a skirmish with a party of Whigs, under Anderson, of Picken's corps, he acknowledged a loss of one eight of his command in killed, wounded and missing. He endeavored to avoid Pickens himself, but, overtaken by that officer, when un apprehensive of danger, was surprised and defeated. He received three wounds, which proved mortal..." "Neighbor had fought against neighbor; and in the exasperation of the moment, the Whigs doomed seventy of their prisoners to death; but they executed only five. About three hundred escaped, and formed the intended junction with the British troops in Georgia."
"Spurgeon, William. Of North Carolina. Major in Boyd's corps. Authorized by Governor Martin, January, 1776, to erect the King's standards, to enlist and array in arms the loyal subjects of Rowan County, and [to oppose all rebels and traitors.] In 1779, in the battle of Kettle Creek, when Boyd was mortally wounded, and Moore, the Lieutenant-Colonel, exhibited a want of military skill, Spurgeon conducted with spirit, and maintained his ground until overpowered. Estate confiscated."
Major William Spurgeon escaped, , with the about 300 men of what was left of Boyd's Provincials and formed the junction with Lt. Colonel Campell and the British troops.

From www.georgiasocietysar.org/.../pdf/brochure_kettlecreek.pdf:

Clarke and Dooly became bogged down in swampy land on both flanks and provided limited support for Pickens' attack. Boyd directed Maj. William Spurgen to move most of the Loyalists across the swollen creek, and then Boyd personally led about 100 men up the hill to hold off Pickens. When three shots tore into Boyd, he fell mortally wounded; his troops panicked and fled toward the creek. Spurgen crossed the creek and regrouped the Loyalists where fighting became very intense for over an hour. Clarke, freed from the swamp, was able to enter the fight with Spurgen during which Clarke's horse was shot; but quickly mounted another. The Loyalists were routed with a loss of 70 killed or wounded, and 150 captured. Boyd died on the battlefield a few hours later. The Patriots reported 9 killed and 23 wounded or missing. Several Loyalist prisoners were later convicted of treason and five hanged, but the rest were pardoned. Spurgen was able to escape with about 270 men and rejoin Lt. Col. Campbell, the remainder probably returned to their homes.

The following is a rebel account of an incident concerning the participation of Major William Spurgin and, a false claim that Major Spurgin was killed. This letter written by General Williamson under the heading of Charlestown, April 7, 1779:
"David Tait Esq; one of Mr. John Stuart's indefatigable deputies in the Creek nations (and now called General, by the enemy) Cherokees and several as savage white men, as far as Fulson's fort on Ogeachie, to join enemy in Georgia... General Williamson having ordered a detachment of horse under the command of Lieut. Col. Ely Kershaw, acting in conjunction with Col. _____ of Georgia, (in all about 200 men) to cross the Savannah River at Beach Island, in order to facilitate the operations of Colonels Hammond and Pickens in Upper parts of that state; he crossed the river accordingly, but not without being discovered by some persons who gave notice thereof to the enemy; Lieut. Col. Prevost ordered Major Spurgin of the Carolina Loyalists, with Major Sharp of the Georgia militia, to attack our detachment. On the 31st of March, at 8 o'clock in the evening, the enemy, amounting to about 200 attacked our people and to it they went. The engagement lasted two hours, when the enemy gave way, leaving Spurgon and several others dead on the field. Our party pursued them two miles, and till they were within seven of the enemy's main body, and after destroying a stockade fort which the enemy had occupied, returned with Sharp, mortally wounded and several other prisoners. Sharp is since dead."{8}
On June 08, 1780, Lord Cornwallis was put in charge of the British Southern Campaign. He turned his troops north to battle at Camden {tradition says William received the commission of Colonel, and John that of Captain} and Wateree and West to Area "96". In Wateree, Cornwallis established a chain of forts. Then by August 15, 1780, Cornwallis' troops defeated the Commands of Gates and Barron de Kalb. Gates' army was reduced from 3,000 men to 700. What was left of these two units was then put under the charge of General Greene who was then joined by Light-horse Harry Lee (the father of Robert E. Lee) and others. The battle of Kings Mountain was fought. Cornwallis engaged Greene at Cowpens in January 1781. Then, Cornwallis pursued Greene to the Dan River {9}, passing by the home of Colonel William Spurgin, Esquire. (One version of this story states that Joseph is the rider another that John is the rider. This is quoted with the exception of me (Roger Spurgeon)using William as the rider instead of John or Joseph. See footnote #10 for my rational.

"When General Green came to Abbott's Creek Meeting House, he halted two or three days to rest his troops. He made his headquarters at the home of Colonel Spurgin, who was in good circumstances, and lived about a mile from the church.
He was a Tory Colonel, one commissioned by Gov. Martin about the beginning of 1776 and had taken quite an active part in favor of the royal cause. Of course, he was not at home to receive his guest, but his wife Mary Spurgin, was as true a Whig as her husband was a Tory and showed General Green all the kindness, and gave him all the encouragement in her power.
Immediately, he selected his ground for battle should it be needed. He told Mrs. Spurgin, should Cornwallis overtake him and there be a battle, she must take all children in the cellar and remain until fighting was over.
Not having heard a word of Cornwallis' movements since he left the trading ford, he felt very anxious to know if he might cross there. Having no other means of information, and knowing Mrs. Spurgin's patriotic spirit, he asked her if she knew of any one in whom he could confide as he wished to send such a one back to the river to secure information in regard to Cornwallis' movements. She told him her son William was reliable, but like a cautious man he repeated his question, whereupon Mrs. Spurgin insisted her son William could be trusted if he would consent to go and she thought he would.
William promptly consented, was put on his horse and told to go back to the trading ford and if he saw nothing of the British to go up the river a few miles. William rode a fine horse with proper vigilance and had not much to dread. On going to the river he Could not see or hear anything so went up river as ordered.
He reported to General Green, but the General told him he must set out again, that he must have information and at once, and if he saw nothing to continue up to Shallow Ford. So young Spurgin set out again and reaching Shallow Ford about thirty miles from home he found the (Cornwallis) man crossing. He turned his horse and rode as fast as he could and reported again to General Green.
Instantly, General Green ordered his horse and was off to Martinville. General Green had only 2000 men of whom five or six hundred were militia. Cornwallis had between twenty-five hundred or three thousand veteran troops, well fed, clothed and equipped.
In Martinville, a council of war was held, and it was determined not to risk a battle with their inferiority of numbers, but get over the Dan River where they expected re-enforcement and would be safe at present.
But we ought to observe how much service the wife and son of a Tory Colonel rendered at this junction of affairs."{10}
One might wonder if William knew of this "junction of affairs". Mary not only supported the enemy of her husband, but put her son in danger of being hung for a spy by the government that was rightly in charge of the country. William Jr. was surely strongly influenced by his mother in her view of the war.
Cornwallis now headed east for Wilmington, then to Yorktown. The Southern Campaign was over, so here, I believe Colonel Spurgin parted company with Cornwallis. Tradition says that he was hiding with a company of Tories. Could he have been recruiting Tories to regain control of the colonies? Or leading organized raids against them? Or both? I believe that this is the case!

From American Battlefield, Trust - article:
"The Southern Theater of the American Revolution"
"Unable to trap and destroy Greene, Cornwallis decided to invade Virginia, still untouched by the war, and cut American supplies to the Carolinas. Cornwallis' initial actions in Virginia were successful; American forces under Lafayette were able to slow, but not stop, Cornwallis' campaign.
Meanwhile, Greene returned to the Carolinas. The armies met again outside Camden, at the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill on April 25, 1781, where the British won the field, but withdrew to Charleston. Afterwards, Greene besieged the British garrison at Ninety Six, but the British were able to lift the siege with reinforcements from Charleston.
from The American Revolution in South Carolina:
[Lord Rawdon took an active part in the campaign through the remainder of 1780, and assumed command as Cornwallis's deputy when the Earl was ill. When Cornwallis advanced north after Cowpens, Rawdon was left behind to defend SC and Georgia with a small independent force. (In William Spurgin's petition he was with Lord Rawdon after Cornwallis went into Virginia)

In April, 1781, he attacked and defeated a superior rebel force under Major General Nathanael Greene at the battle of Hobkirk's Hill. Cornwallis described his victory as "by far the most splendid of this war," and said that, "His lordship's great abilities, courage, and firmness of mind, cannot be sufficiently admired and applauded." Boatner also gives the action a glowing assessment:

"As Green marched against him at Camden the 26-year-old British commander showed outstanding generalship...Instead of remaining on the defensive, Rawdon scraped together every able-bodied man and attacked Greene at Hobkirk's Hill, 25 Apr '81, where his audacity and skill, and the good performance of his own Vols. of Ireland, were rewarded with victory. Furthermore he had the good strategic sense and the moral courage to order the evacuation of the most exposed posts."

Unfortunately, the victory produced no lasting effect, and Rawdon was forced to begin a gradual retreat to Charleston. By 24 May he had withdrawn from Camden to Moncks Corner, where he joined a relief column and marched to the rescue of Ninety-Six, which was under siege by Greene's army. He arrived barely in time to save the harassed garrison, and after evacuating Ninety-Six, he withdrew to the area between the Santee and Edisto rivers.

It was a long, miserable retreat, as Tarleton vividly describes:

"It is impossible to do justice to the spirit, patience, and invincible fortitude, displayed by the commanders, officers, and soldiers, during these dreadful campaigns in the two Carolinas. They were not only to contend with men, and these by no means deficient in bravery and enterprize, but they encountered and surmounted difficulties and fatigues from the climate and the country, which would appear insuperable in theory, and almost incredible in the relation. They displayed military, and, we may add, moral virtues, far above all praise. During renewed successions of forced marches, under the rage of a burning sun, and in a climate, at that season, peculiarly inimical to man, they were frequently, when sinking under the most excessive fatigue, not only destitute of every comfort, but almost of every necessary which seems essential to his existence. During the greater part of the time, they were totally destitute of bread, and the country afforded no vegetables for a substitute. Salt at length failed; and their only resources were water, and the wild cattle which they found in the woods. Above fifty men, in this last expedition, sunk under the vigour of their exertions, and perished through mere fatigue."

The combination of fatigue and recurring bouts of malaria had ruined Rawdon's health. In July, he passed on his command, and, on 20 July '81 sailed for England.]

Despite the victory at Ninety Six, the efforts of Greene and patriot militia leaders forced the British to withdraw. Greene attacked the British again at Eutaw Springs on September 8, 1781, where despite retreating, Greene inflicted enough casualties to compel the British to withdraw toward Charleston. With American forces under Lieutenant Colonel Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee driving the British back to Savannah, and Greene pinning the British in Charleston, the patriots were rapidly solidifying control of Georgia and South Carolina."

Captain John Spurgin became a Major and was killed in South Carolina (see Major John Spurgin's notes). In the South well into 1782, there would be scuffles, raids, and savage encounters largely between Whigs and Tories - extensions of conflicts that had existed before the war and would continue after it. The same was true in the far reaches of the bloody Mohawk Valley, while beyond the Allegheny mountains the fighting would go on for thirteen more years, during which more Americans were killed than in all the major Revolutionary battles combined."{11}
Sometime before 1787, William met and married Ann Bedsaul while in the New River area of Virginia. Being loyal to King George he did not secure a divorce from Mary Jane through the fledgling American government. In his will he indicated his belief the new government stole his property in North Carolina. He did not respect the newly formed government's authority. A warrant for his arrest was issued for his actions aligned with the king's cause. Afterward, he moved to Canada, obtained land grants from the king and became Justice of the Peace at his new home. His first petition states that William had left his property and joined Lord Cornwallis in the last war. He asked for 200 acres of land near Long Point. His order was granted.{12} A second petition was made stating his many services rendered to His Majesty's troops during the American War. He was ordered 1,200 acres.{13} One Thousand acres are recorded in his will. William's will, recorded in the London District, Upper Canada, Surrogate Court, Register "A", 1800 - 1817, PAGES 67 - 71, Will #12:

Family tradition from Col. William Spurgin's son Joseph:

1. William was Justice of the Peace in the first court held in Rowan County, North Carolina.
2. William went to meet and saw Lord Cornwallis near Charleston, South Carolina and afterward went with his brother John Spurgin to Camden, South Carolina, where William obtained a commission of Colonel and John that of Captain.
3. Colonel William Spurgin was offered two important offices by the Whig party if he would join them and was finally offered the office of Governor, and his wife and family desired him to join the Liberty party, but he insisted that he could not conscientiously, after having sworn allegiance to the King.
4. William Spurgin with a company, went with Daniel Boone and his company to Kentucky and formed two settlements. William procured the land himself by ax entry where Lexington is now located, and made his settlement there, and Boone about 60 miles off. The Indians became so troublesome that John Spurgin went and sold the land where Lexington stands for a remarkable fine dark chestnut sorrel horse and brought him to his father, who rode him all the remainder of the time that he spent in this country.
{Boone formed a settlement in 1777, so this is probably the time that William Spurgin made his claim of land where Lexington, Ky would develop if this story proves true. Mary Jane's cousin's son, Issac Crabtree was with Boone's son when he was captured and tortured to death by the Indians in 1775. All this cause me to wonder what was the ties or relationship between Boone and the Colonel. Boone was accused of being sided with the Tories. Could his possible relationship with the Colonel given fuel to this belief? William's son Joseph's descendants married into the Boone line. Grandson of the Colonel, William Spurgin, was next door neighbor to Boone's friend, Michajah Callaway in Washington County, Indiana. Grandson Cadwalder Jones, was a hunting companion of Callaway. Were Boone and the Colonel friends, business partners or acquaintances?}
5. When Colonel Spurgin was remaining in the woods concealed, son Joseph took provisions to his father and a company of Tories and to tell him if he could not join the Liberty Party to have nothing to do with the Tory cause. Joseph was chased but not caught by the Whigs on this errand.
6. After peace, William hid in the woods for several years before going to the New River area of Virginia. He returned home in 1792, then went to Canada.{14}
Although compensation of Tory Lands were agreed to by the American government to England at the close of the war, our family did not receive any at all.{15} Mary Jane tried to get the confiscated land back, but was refused. Mary Jane died in Rowan County on August 3, 1803 and was buried in the Abbot's Creek Primitive Baptist Cemetery. William died at Charlottesville, Ontario, Canada on August 13, 1806.

For more information on the children of Colonel William Spurgin Esquire, see the Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 20, "Four Generations of the William Spurgeon Family.

{1. "Abbots Creek Settlement", Pathfinders Past and Present, A History of Davidson County, N.C. p.15
{2. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 20, pages 491-193.
{3. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 20, pages 491-493.
{4. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 18, page 435.
{5. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 15, page 372.
{6. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 311.
{7. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 322.
{7a "Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia" The Battle of Kettle Creek.
{8. "The Virginia Gazette", May1, 1779, Number 12, Williamsburg: printed by Dixon & Nicolson.
{9. "History of the American Revolution",The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, pages324-330.
{10. "The Old North State of 1776", Caruthers Addition of, second series, pages 39-45.Note:William A. Spurgeon of Muncie, founder of the Spurgeon Quarterly made a statement about the Spurgin Rider. The history was found in the Caruthers Addition, "The Old North State in 1776", second series, pages 39-45. John, Joseph and William were disputed as to have been the rider. William A. Spurgeon's rational is: "The year was 1780-81. Reference A3 states John was sent on the mission, but also states he was but a "mere youth". John was born 1775 so would have been about 25 years old. Son William was born about 1763 and would have been about 17 years old, The next son, Joseph, would have been about 11 years old, so I suggest William is the most likely one to have gone on the mission. William A. Spurgeon, Muncie, Indiana 1979". His rational satisfies me. The Boone family history book claims the rider to have been Joseph. Seems that in all cases the rider is the one most believed to be the rider by the one writing about the story. A descendant who joined the DAR indicated that all three sons rode missions for Gen. Green, John having taken a message to Gen. George Washington.
{11. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 312.
{12. Ontario, Canada, Dept. of Public Records & Archives, Toronto, Canada, Land Book A 7/15/1794.
{13. Ontario, Canada, Dept. of Public Records & Archives, Toronto, Canada, Land Book B 1/24/1794.
{14. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 18, page 435.
{15. "America Past and Present", by Divine, Breen, Fredrickson and Williams, page 148.

Children of WILLIAM SPURGIN and MARY WELBORN are:
8. i. WILLIAM5 SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1763, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1805, Rowan County, North Carolina.
9. ii. JOHN SPURGIN, b. February 07, 1753; d. March 20, 1803, Near Blountsville, Sullivan County, Tennessee.
iii. MARGARET SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1755; m. MR. JONES.
iv. REBECCA SPURGIN, b. May 25, 1757, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1787; m. MICHAEL HINKLE; b. September 07, 1749; d. 1789.
v. MARY SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1759.
vi. AGNES SPURGIN, b. February 07, 1763; d. 1847; m. PETER BOTTENHEIMER, January 19, 1793, Rowan County, North Carolina.

More About PETER BOTTENHEIMER and AGNES SPURGIN:
Marriage: January 19, 1793, Rowan County, North Carolina

10. vii. JENNETTE (JANE) SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1768, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1831. m. Aquila Jones (parents of Cadwallader Jones)
11. viii. JOSEPH SPURGIN, b. April 20, 1770, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. May 26, 1859, Davidson County, North Carolina.
ix. ELIZABETH SPURGIN, b. June 02, 1772, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. August 12, 1803, Rowan County, North Carolina; m. JACOB BOTTENHEIMER, June 01, 1792, Rowan County, North Carolina.

More About JACOB BOTTENHEIMER and ELIZABETH SPURGIN:
Marriage: June 01, 1792, Rowan County, North Carolina

12. x. ISAIAH SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1774, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1816, Washington County, Indiana.
13. xi. JOSIAH SPURGIN, b. November 13, 1777, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. January 15, 1857, Salem, Washington County, Indiana.
14. xii. DR./JUDGE JESSE SPURGIN, b. June 30, 1780, Rowan County, North Carolina.

Children of WILLIAM SPURGIN and ANN BEDSAUL are:
15. xiii. AARON5 SPURGIN, b. 1787, North Carolina; d. April 11, 1855, Columbus Twp., Bartholomew Co., Indiana.
16. xiv. SAMUEL SPURGIN, b. February 08, 1794, Canada; d. July 1849, Bartholomew Co. Indiana.
xv. ANNE (NANCY) SPURGIN, b. 1796.
xvi. SARAH SPURGIN, b. 1799.

5. COLONEL, WILLIAM SPURGIN, ESQUIRE was born June 06, 1734 in Fredericks County, Maryland, and died August 13, 1806 in Charlottesville, Ontario Province, Canada. He married (1) MARY JANE WELBORN or SELLERS Abt. 1752 in Maryland or Virginia, daughter of JOHN WELBORN and ANN CRABTREE. She was born June 20, 1736 in Chatham County, Maryland, and died August 03, 1803 in Rowan County, North Carolina. He married (2) ANN Bedsaul Reddick Abt. 1787 in Virginia/Pennsylvania. She was born in Virginia/Pennsylvania.

Notes for COLONEL, WILLIAM SPURGIN, ESQUIRE:
From "Pathfinders Past and Present, a History of Davidson County, North Carolina" p. 15:

"Abbots Creek Settlement

From gravestones and other records, it appears that the first settlers of the Abbots Creek community were English, Welsh, Irish and German. The earliest deeds were dated around 1758 but it is known that several families were living in this community some years before that date.
One of the first settlers was William Spurgeon in possession of whose family today are some interesting documents relating to his life. Of a noted Spurgeon family in England, he had come from the Maryland side of the Potomac early in the 1750's to fertile land on the headwaters of Abbots Creek. There he purchased a large acreage, persuaded his brother John and Mother to come and buy a plantation near his, and became an influential figure in the county. He was one of the first Justices of Rowan County. His family, too, as other chapters will show, played important roles in later years. In Volume I of the Moravian Records it is noted that [the early part of the year 1767 was marked by a good deal of missionary work on the part of Richard Uttley, English minister of Wachovia.] Frequently on Saturday a messenger would arrive from one of the adjacent settlements and would take Br. Uttly back to preach for them on the following Sunday. Among the places mentioned more or less frequently was Justice William Sporgin's (sic) house on Abbots Creek..."{1}
During the turmoil of the French and Indian War, William sold his father's property at Packhorse Ford on the headwaters of the Potomac River and on the west side of the Shenandoah River. William, his wife Mary Jane, mother Mary, and brothers, John and Samuel moved near Abbott's Creek, North Carolina.
William bought 310 acres from John Fullerlane on October 2, 1759. From July 6, 1771 on through August of 1772, William buys and sells properties and gives property to the Welborn family, suggesting relationship of the Welborn's to William's family.{2} Some researchers of the Welborn family claim Mary Jane's maiden name to be Welborn, and because of the above described buying and selling, many of the Spurgeon researchers believe Mary Jane Sellers maiden name to be Welborn. Son Joseph Spurgin stated that his mother's name before marrying William was Mary Jane Sellers, so she very possibly was married previously to a Mr. Sellers or Sellers could have been her maiden name.
From the earliest surviving Rowan County court records, William appears as Justice of the Peace of that county from1764 to 1775.{3} He had full judicial, executive and legislative powers in his jurisdiction. Family sources say, the "first court ever held in Rowan County was under an oak tree, and William Spurgin was a Justice of the Peace under King George III, and helped hold that court".{4} No Doubt, William received a good education (probably a credit to his parents) before arriving in North Carolina.
On January 10, 1776, William and other Justices were directed by Governor Josiah Martin "to erect the King's standards to raise, levy, muster , and array in arms all his Majesty's loyal and Faithful subjects within your respective counties..." {5} America's revolt against England had begun. William did as he was commissioned. He fought with Boyd's Provincials of North Carolina, and in North Carolina, the fighting was described as, "bands of Whigs and Tories raiding each others areas, plundering, burning and killing. Whatever their origin, whoever their leaders, civil war was being fought in the Carolinas. Bloody combats and bitter violent brutal fighting flared from both sides with quarter unknown."{6}
In late 1778, the British sailed onto the South Carolina and Georga coast. There were British, Hessians and Tory units. The Tory units were under Lt. Col. Archibald Cambell. They landed at Tybee Island at the mouth of the Savannah River. As this occurred, British General Augustive Prevost moved up the coast from British Florida with his command. American General Robert Howe tried to stop the union of the two units to no avail. By January of 1779, the British had captured Sunbury, Georgia and all of the Savannah River up to Augusta.{7}

From Wikipedia Encyclopedia on the internet:
"The British began their "southern strategy" by sending expeditions from New York City and Saint Augustine, East Florida to capture Savannah, Georgia late in 1778. The New York expedition, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Campbell, arrived first, and successfully captured the town on December 29, 1778.
[edit] British recruitment
When Brigadier General Augustine Prevost arrived from Saint Augustine in mid-January, he assumed command of the garrison there, and sent Campbell on an expedition to take control of Augusta and raise Loyalist militia companies.
Leaving Savannah on January 24, Campbell and more than 1,000 men arrived near Augusta a week later, with only minimal harassment from Georgia Patriot militia on the way. Augusta had been defended by South Carolina General Andrew Williamson leading about 1,000 militia from Georgia and South Carolina, but he withdrew most of his men when Campbell approached. This rear guard skirmished with Campbell's men before withdrawing across the Savannah River into South Carolina.[2]
Campbell then began recruiting Loyalists. About 1,100 men signed up, but relatively few actually formed militia companies. Campbell then began requiring oaths of loyalty, on pain of forfeiture of property; many took this oath insincerely, quickly letting Williamson know their true feelings. An expedition by James Boyd went all the way into North Carolina, where he met with success, and recruited several hundred men. As he traveled south back toward Augusta, more Loyalists joined his company, until it numbered over 600 men in central South Carolina. As this column moved on, the men plundered and pillaged along the way, predictably drawing angered Patriot supporters to take up arms.
South Carolina militia Colonel Andrew Pickens raised 350 men and headed toward Augusta to join Williamson. When he learned of Boyd's passage through Ninety Six, he moved to intercept before Boyd could reach Savannah. Boyd reached Cherokee Ford, where eight Patriots with small swivel guns in an entrenched position repulsed Boyd's approach. Boyd moved north about 5 miles (8.0 km) and crossed the river there. Pickens crossed into Georgia after Boyd, and began following him toward Augusta. On February 14, he caught up with Boyd when he was encamped near Kettle Creek.
[edit] Battle
Boyd was apparently unaware that he was being followed so closely, and his camp, while guards were posted, was not particularly alert. Pickens advanced, leading the center, while his left flank was under the command of Elijah Clarke and the right was under John Dooly. Gunfire between Patriot scouts and the camp guards alerted Boyd to the situation, who managed to form a defensive position atop a hill, and surprise Pickens. Flanking maneuvers by Clarke and Dooly were slowed by the swampy conditions, so they did not immediately arrive on the battlefield."
Things at first went badly for Pickens, but then a lucky musket shot hit Boyd, mortally wounding him, and the Patriot flanks began to emerge from the swamps. The Loyalists, led by Boyd's second in command, William Spurgen, fell back, but the disorganized retreat rapidly became a rout. {7a}

From "Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution", by Lorenzo Sabine (Boston: Little, Brown& Company, 1864), "Boyd", page246, "Spurgeon", page 325:
"Boyd, -----, Of Carolina. Colonel, and in command of a corps of Tories, who were robbers rather than soldiers. What they could not consume or carry off, they burned. Boyd himself was bold, enterprising, and famed for his dishonesty. He had a conference with Sir Henry Clinton at New York, and planned an insurrection in the back part of South Carolina, to be executed as soon as the Royal Army should obtain possession of Savannah. In 1779, at the head of eight hundred men, he passed through the district of Ninety-Six on his way to Georga, and destroyed life and property by sword and fire, along his whole route. In a skirmish with a party of Whigs, under Anderson, of Picken's corps, he acknowledged a loss of one eight of his command in killed, wounded and missing. He endeavored to avoid Pickens himself, but, overtaken by that officer, when un apprehensive of danger, was surprised and defeated. He received three wounds, which proved mortal..." "Neighbor had fought against neighbor; and in the exasperation of the moment, the Whigs doomed seventy of their prisoners to death; but they executed only five. About three hundred escaped, and formed the intended junction with the British troops in Georgia."
"Spurgeon, William. Of North Carolina. Major in Boyd's corps. Authorized by Governor Martin, January, 1776, to erect the King's standards, to enlist and array in arms the loyal subjects of Rowan County, and [to oppose all rebels and traitors.] In 1779, in the battle of Kettle Creek, when Boyd was mortally wounded, and Moore, the Lieutenant-Colonel, exhibited a want of military skill, Spurgeon conducted with spirit, and maintained his ground until overpowered. Estate confiscated."
Major William Spurgeon escaped, , with the about 300 men of what was left of Boyd's Provincials and formed the junction with Lt. Colonel Campell and the British troops.

From www.georgiasocietysar.org/.../pdf/brochure_kettlecreek.pdf:

Clarke and Dooly became bogged down in swampy land on both flanks and provided limited support for Pickens' attack. Boyd directed Maj. William Spurgen to move most of the Loyalists across the swollen creek, and then Boyd personally led about 100 men up the hill to hold off Pickens. When three shots tore into Boyd, he fell mortally wounded; his troops panicked and fled toward the creek. Spurgen crossed the creek and regrouped the Loyalists where fighting became very intense for over an hour. Clarke, freed from the swamp, was able to enter the fight with Spurgen during which Clarke's horse was shot; but quickly mounted another. The Loyalists were routed with a loss of 70 killed or wounded, and 150 captured. Boyd died on the battlefield a few hours later. The Patriots reported 9 killed and 23 wounded or missing. Several Loyalist prisoners were later convicted of treason and five hanged, but the rest were pardoned. Spurgen was able to escape with about 270 men and rejoin Lt. Col. Campbell, the remainder probably returned to their homes.

The following is a rebel account of an incident concerning the participation of Major William Spurgin and, a false claim that Major Spurgin was killed. This letter written by General Williamson under the heading of Charlestown, April 7, 1779:
"David Tait Esq; one of Mr. John Stuart's indefatigable deputies in the Creek nations (and now called General, by the enemy) Cherokees and several as savage white men, as far as Fulson's fort on Ogeachie, to join enemy in Georgia... General Williamson having ordered a detachment of horse under the command of Lieut. Col. Ely Kershaw, acting in conjunction with Col. _____ of Georgia, (in all about 200 men) to cross the Savannah River at Beach Island, in order to facilitate the operations of Colonels Hammond and Pickens in Upper parts of that state; he crossed the river accordingly, but not without being discovered by some persons who gave notice thereof to the enemy; Lieut. Col. Prevost ordered Major Spurgin of the Carolina Loyalists, with Major Sharp of the Georgia militia, to attack our detachment. On the 31st of March, at 8 o'clock in the evening, the enemy, amounting to about 200 attacked our people and to it they went. The engagement lasted two hours, when the enemy gave way, leaving Spurgon and several others dead on the field. Our party pursued them two miles, and till they were within seven of the enemy's main body, and after destroying a stockade fort which the enemy had occupied, returned with Sharp, mortally wounded and several other prisoners. Sharp is since dead."{8}
On June 08, 1780, Lord Cornwallis was put in charge of the British Southern Campaign. He turned his troops north to battle at Camden {tradition says William received the commission of Colonel, and John that of Captain} and Wateree and West to Area "96". In Wateree, Cornwallis established a chain of forts. Then by August 15, 1780, Cornwallis' troops defeated the Commands of Gates and Barron de Kalb. Gates' army was reduced from 3,000 men to 700. What was left of these two units was then put under the charge of General Greene who was then joined by Light-horse Harry Lee (the father of Robert E. Lee) and others. The battle of Kings Mountain was fought. Cornwallis engaged Greene at Cowpens in January 1781. Then, Cornwallis pursued Greene to the Dan River {9}, passing by the home of Colonel William Spurgin, Esquire. (One version of this story states that Joseph is the rider another that John is the rider. This is quoted with the exception of me (Roger Spurgeon)using William as the rider instead of John or Joseph. See footnote #10 for my rational.

"When General Green came to Abbott's Creek Meeting House, he halted two or three days to rest his troops. He made his headquarters at the home of Colonel Spurgin, who was in good circumstances, and lived about a mile from the church.
He was a Tory Colonel, one commissioned by Gov. Martin about the beginning of 1776 and had taken quite an active part in favor of the royal cause. Of course, he was not at home to receive his guest, but his wife Mary Spurgin, was as true a Whig as her husband was a Tory and showed General Green all the kindness, and gave him all the encouragement in her power.
Immediately, he selected his ground for battle should it be needed. He told Mrs. Spurgin, should Cornwallis overtake him and there be a battle, she must take all children in the cellar and remain until fighting was over.
Not having heard a word of Cornwallis' movements since he left the trading ford, he felt very anxious to know if he might cross there. Having no other means of information, and knowing Mrs. Spurgin's patriotic spirit, he asked her if she knew of any one in whom he could confide as he wished to send such a one back to the river to secure information in regard to Cornwallis' movements. She told him her son William was reliable, but like a cautious man he repeated his question, whereupon Mrs. Spurgin insisted her son William could be trusted if he would consent to go and she thought he would.
William promptly consented, was put on his horse and told to go back to the trading ford and if he saw nothing of the British to go up the river a few miles. William rode a fine horse with proper vigilance and had not much to dread. On going to the river he Could not see or hear anything so went up river as ordered.
He reported to General Green, but the General told him he must set out again, that he must have information and at once, and if he saw nothing to continue up to Shallow Ford. So young Spurgin set out again and reaching Shallow Ford about thirty miles from home he found the (Cornwallis) man crossing. He turned his horse and rode as fast as he could and reported again to General Green.
Instantly, General Green ordered his horse and was off to Martinville. General Green had only 2000 men of whom five or six hundred were militia. Cornwallis had between twenty-five hundred or three thousand veteran troops, well fed, clothed and equipped.
In Martinville, a council of war was held, and it was determined not to risk a battle with their inferiority of numbers, but get over the Dan River where they expected re-enforcement and would be safe at present.
But we ought to observe how much service the wife and son of a Tory Colonel rendered at this junction of affairs."{10}
One might wonder if William knew of this "junction of affairs". Mary not only supported the enemy of her husband, but put her son in danger of being hung for a spy by the government that was rightly in charge of the country. William Jr. was surely strongly influenced by his mother in her view of the war.
Cornwallis now headed east for Wilmington, then to Yorktown. The Southern Campaign was over, so here, I believe Colonel Spurgin parted company with Cornwallis. Tradition says that he was hiding with a company of Tories. Could he have been recruiting Tories to regain control of the colonies? Or leading organized raids against them? Or both? I believe that this is the case!

From American Battlefield, Trust - article:
"The Southern Theater of the American Revolution"
"Unable to trap and destroy Greene, Cornwallis decided to invade Virginia, still untouched by the war, and cut American supplies to the Carolinas. Cornwallis' initial actions in Virginia were successful; American forces under Lafayette were able to slow, but not stop, Cornwallis' campaign.
Meanwhile, Greene returned to the Carolinas. The armies met again outside Camden, at the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill on April 25, 1781, where the British won the field, but withdrew to Charleston. Afterwards, Greene besieged the British garrison at Ninety Six, but the British were able to lift the siege with reinforcements from Charleston.
from The American Revolution in South Carolina:
[Lord Rawdon took an active part in the campaign through the remainder of 1780, and assumed command as Cornwallis's deputy when the Earl was ill. When Cornwallis advanced north after Cowpens, Rawdon was left behind to defend SC and Georgia with a small independent force. (In William Spurgin's petition he was with Lord Rawdon after Cornwallis went into Virginia)

In April, 1781, he attacked and defeated a superior rebel force under Major General Nathanael Greene at the battle of Hobkirk's Hill. Cornwallis described his victory as "by far the most splendid of this war," and said that, "His lordship's great abilities, courage, and firmness of mind, cannot be sufficiently admired and applauded." Boatner also gives the action a glowing assessment:

"As Green marched against him at Camden the 26-year-old British commander showed outstanding generalship...Instead of remaining on the defensive, Rawdon scraped together every able-bodied man and attacked Greene at Hobkirk's Hill, 25 Apr '81, where his audacity and skill, and the good performance of his own Vols. of Ireland, were rewarded with victory. Furthermore he had the good strategic sense and the moral courage to order the evacuation of the most exposed posts."

Unfortunately, the victory produced no lasting effect, and Rawdon was forced to begin a gradual retreat to Charleston. By 24 May he had withdrawn from Camden to Moncks Corner, where he joined a relief column and marched to the rescue of Ninety-Six, which was under siege by Greene's army. He arrived barely in time to save the harassed garrison, and after evacuating Ninety-Six, he withdrew to the area between the Santee and Edisto rivers.

It was a long, miserable retreat, as Tarleton vividly describes:

"It is impossible to do justice to the spirit, patience, and invincible fortitude, displayed by the commanders, officers, and soldiers, during these dreadful campaigns in the two Carolinas. They were not only to contend with men, and these by no means deficient in bravery and enterprize, but they encountered and surmounted difficulties and fatigues from the climate and the country, which would appear insuperable in theory, and almost incredible in the relation. They displayed military, and, we may add, moral virtues, far above all praise. During renewed successions of forced marches, under the rage of a burning sun, and in a climate, at that season, peculiarly inimical to man, they were frequently, when sinking under the most excessive fatigue, not only destitute of every comfort, but almost of every necessary which seems essential to his existence. During the greater part of the time, they were totally destitute of bread, and the country afforded no vegetables for a substitute. Salt at length failed; and their only resources were water, and the wild cattle which they found in the woods. Above fifty men, in this last expedition, sunk under the vigour of their exertions, and perished through mere fatigue."

The combination of fatigue and recurring bouts of malaria had ruined Rawdon's health. In July, he passed on his command, and, on 20 July '81 sailed for England.]

Despite the victory at Ninety Six, the efforts of Greene and patriot militia leaders forced the British to withdraw. Greene attacked the British again at Eutaw Springs on September 8, 1781, where despite retreating, Greene inflicted enough casualties to compel the British to withdraw toward Charleston. With American forces under Lieutenant Colonel Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee driving the British back to Savannah, and Greene pinning the British in Charleston, the patriots were rapidly solidifying control of Georgia and South Carolina."

Captain John Spurgin became a Major and was killed in South Carolina (see Major John Spurgin's notes). In the South well into 1782, there would be scuffles, raids, and savage encounters largely between Whigs and Tories - extensions of conflicts that had existed before the war and would continue after it. The same was true in the far reaches of the bloody Mohawk Valley, while beyond the Allegheny mountains the fighting would go on for thirteen more years, during which more Americans were killed than in all the major Revolutionary battles combined."{11}
Sometime before 1787, William met and married Ann Bedsaul while in the New River area of Virginia. Being loyal to King George he did not secure a divorce from Mary Jane through the fledgling American government. In his will he indicated his belief the new government stole his property in North Carolina. He did not respect the newly formed government's authority. A warrant for his arrest was issued for his actions aligned with the king's cause. Afterward, he moved to Canada, obtained land grants from the king and became Justice of the Peace at his new home. His first petition states that William had left his property and joined Lord Cornwallis in the last war. He asked for 200 acres of land near Long Point. His order was granted.{12} A second petition was made stating his many services rendered to His Majesty's troops during the American War. He was ordered 1,200 acres.{13} One Thousand acres are recorded in his will. William's will, recorded in the London District, Upper Canada, Surrogate Court, Register "A", 1800 - 1817, PAGES 67 - 71, Will #12:

Family tradition from Col. William Spurgin's son Joseph:

1. William was Justice of the Peace in the first court held in Rowan County, North Carolina.
2. William went to meet and saw Lord Cornwallis near Charleston, South Carolina and afterward went with his brother John Spurgin to Camden, South Carolina, where William obtained a commission of Colonel and John that of Captain.
3. Colonel William Spurgin was offered two important offices by the Whig party if he would join them and was finally offered the office of Governor, and his wife and family desired him to join the Liberty party, but he insisted that he could not conscientiously, after having sworn allegiance to the King.
4. William Spurgin with a company, went with Daniel Boone and his company to Kentucky and formed two settlements. William procured the land himself by ax entry where Lexington is now located, and made his settlement there, and Boone about 60 miles off. The Indians became so troublesome that John Spurgin went and sold the land where Lexington stands for a remarkable fine dark chestnut sorrel horse and brought him to his father, who rode him all the remainder of the time that he spent in this country.
{Boone formed a settlement in 1777, so this is probably the time that William Spurgin made his claim of land where Lexington, Ky would develop if this story proves true. Mary Jane's cousin's son, Issac Crabtree was with Boone's son when he was captured and tortured to death by the Indians in 1775. All this cause me to wonder what was the ties or relationship between Boone and the Colonel. Boone was accused of being sided with the Tories. Could his possible relationship with the Colonel given fuel to this belief? William's son Joseph's descendants married into the Boone line. Grandson of the Colonel, William Spurgin, was next door neighbor to Boone's friend, Michajah Callaway in Washington County, Indiana. Grandson Cadwalder Jones, was a hunting companion of Callaway. Were Boone and the Colonel friends, business partners or acquaintances?}
5. When Colonel Spurgin was remaining in the woods concealed, son Joseph took provisions to his father and a company of Tories and to tell him if he could not join the Liberty Party to have nothing to do with the Tory cause. Joseph was chased but not caught by the Whigs on this errand.
6. After peace, William hid in the woods for several years before going to the New River area of Virginia. He returned home in 1792, then went to Canada.{14}
Although compensation of Tory Lands were agreed to by the American government to England at the close of the war, our family did not receive any at all.{15} Mary Jane tried to get the confiscated land back, but was refused. Mary Jane died in Rowan County on August 3, 1803 and was buried in the Abbot's Creek Primitive Baptist Cemetery. William died at Charlottesville, Ontario, Canada on August 13, 1806.

For more information on the children of Colonel William Spurgin Esquire, see the Spurgeon Quarterly, Issue 20, "Four Generations of the William Spurgeon Family.

{1. "Abbots Creek Settlement", Pathfinders Past and Present, A History of Davidson County, N.C. p.15
{2. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 20, pages 491-193.
{3. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 20, pages 491-493.
{4. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 18, page 435.
{5. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 15, page 372.
{6. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 311.
{7. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 322.
{7a "Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia" The Battle of Kettle Creek.
{8. "The Virginia Gazette", May1, 1779, Number 12, Williamsburg: printed by Dixon & Nicolson.
{9. "History of the American Revolution",The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, pages324-330.
{10. "The Old North State of 1776", Caruthers Addition of, second series, pages 39-45.Note:William A. Spurgeon of Muncie, founder of the Spurgeon Quarterly made a statement about the Spurgin Rider. The history was found in the Caruthers Addition, "The Old North State in 1776", second series, pages 39-45. John, Joseph and William were disputed as to have been the rider. William A. Spurgeon's rational is: "The year was 1780-81. Reference A3 states John was sent on the mission, but also states he was but a "mere youth". John was born 1775 so would have been about 25 years old. Son William was born about 1763 and would have been about 17 years old, The next son, Joseph, would have been about 11 years old, so I suggest William is the most likely one to have gone on the mission. William A. Spurgeon, Muncie, Indiana 1979". His rational satisfies me. The Boone family history book claims the rider to have been Joseph. Seems that in all cases the rider is the one most believed to be the rider by the one writing about the story. A descendant who joined the DAR indicated that all three sons rode missions for Gen. Green, John having taken a message to Gen. George Washington.
{11. "History of the American Revolution", The American Heritage, by Bruce Lancaster, page 312.
{12. Ontario, Canada, Dept. of Public Records & Archives, Toronto, Canada, Land Book A 7/15/1794.
{13. Ontario, Canada, Dept. of Public Records & Archives, Toronto, Canada, Land Book B 1/24/1794.
{14. "The Spurgeon Quarterly", Issue 18, page 435.
{15. "America Past and Present", by Divine, Breen, Fredrickson and Williams, page 148.

Children of WILLIAM SPURGIN and MARY WELBORN are:
8. i. WILLIAM5 SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1763, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. Abt. 1805, Rowan County, North Carolina.
9. ii. JOHN SPURGIN, b. February 07, 1753; d. March 20, 1803, Near Blountsville, Sullivan County, Tennessee.
iii. MARGARET SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1755; m. MR. JONES.
iv. REBECCA SPURGIN, b. May 25, 1757, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1787; m. MICHAEL HINKLE; b. September 07, 1749; d. 1789.
v. MARY SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1759.
vi. AGNES SPURGIN, b. February 07, 1763; d. 1847; m. PETER BOTTENHEIMER, January 19, 1793, Rowan County, North Carolina.

More About PETER BOTTENHEIMER and AGNES SPURGIN:
Marriage: January 19, 1793, Rowan County, North Carolina

10. vii. JENNETTE (JANE) SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1768, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1831. m. Aquila Jones (parents of Cadwallader Jones)
11. viii. JOSEPH SPURGIN, b. April 20, 1770, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. May 26, 1859, Davidson County, North Carolina.
ix. ELIZABETH SPURGIN, b. June 02, 1772, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. August 12, 1803, Rowan County, North Carolina; m. JACOB BOTTENHEIMER, June 01, 1792, Rowan County, North Carolina.

More About JACOB BOTTENHEIMER and ELIZABETH SPURGIN:
Marriage: June 01, 1792, Rowan County, North Carolina

12. x. ISAIAH SPURGIN, b. Abt. 1774, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. 1816, Washington County, Indiana.
13. xi. JOSIAH SPURGIN, b. November 13, 1777, Rowan County, North Carolina; d. January 15, 1857, Salem, Washington County, Indiana.
14. xii. DR./JUDGE JESSE SPURGIN, b. June 30, 1780, Rowan County, North Carolina.

Children of WILLIAM SPURGIN and ANN BEDSAUL are:
15. xiii. AARON5 SPURGIN, b. 1787, North Carolina; d. April 11, 1855, Columbus Twp., Bartholomew Co., Indiana.
16. xiv. SAMUEL SPURGIN, b. February 08, 1794, Canada; d. July 1849, Bartholomew Co. Indiana.
xv. ANNE (NANCY) SPURGIN, b. 1796.
xvi. SARAH SPURGIN, b. 1799.


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