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 Dorothy Morris

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Dorothy Morris Famous memorial

Birth
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Death
20 Nov 2011 (aged 89)
Palm Springs, Riverside County, California, USA
Burial
Donated to Medical Science. Specifically: Donated to the University of California at Riverside
Memorial ID
113152706 View Source

Actress. Best remembered for her "girl next door" persona, she began her film career during World War II. Born Dorothy Ruth Morris, she was the daughter of a Hollywood stockbroker. She became interested in acting, performing in amateur theater shows as a young girl and was spotted by a talent agent in 1940 during a school play shortly before graduating from Hollywood High School. She began studying under famed drama Marie Ouspenskaya and a strong performance in a Pasadena Playhouse stage comedy of "What a Life" led to her first film, an uncredited part in "Her First Beau" (1941), followed by uncredited parts in "Whistling in the Dark" (1941), "Babes on Broadway" (1941), and "Rio Rita" (1942). In 1942 she contracted with MGM studios and screen tested for the female lead in "The Courtship of Andy Hardy" but lost out to Donna Reed. Afterward, she appeared in several films including "This Time for Keeps" (1942), "Keeper of the Flame" (1942), "The Youngest Profession," The Human Comedy" (1943), "Cry 'Havoc'" (1943), "Someone to Remember" (1943), "Rationing" (1944), and "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" (1944). Her biggest box office success came in 1945 with "Our Vines Have Tender Grapes" when she starred as the doomed Ingeborg Jensen. She also appeared in MGM short films including the "Pete Smith Specialties," "The Passing Parade," and "Crime Does Not Pay" series, the latter turning out so well that MGM expanded it into a full-length feature, "Main Street After Dark" in 1945. In 1946 she took a hiatus from acting until the late 1950s when she made guest appearances on television shows like "The Untouchables," "Gunsmoke,' "The Donna Reed Show," "Rawhide," "The Millionaire," and "Wagon Train" along with a featured role in the shocker film "Macabre" (1958). Following a small role in "Seconds" (1966) she left her career but returned to television in the early 1970s with episodes in "Dragnet," "The Name of the Game," and "Marcus Welby, M.D." She died at the age of 89.

Actress. Best remembered for her "girl next door" persona, she began her film career during World War II. Born Dorothy Ruth Morris, she was the daughter of a Hollywood stockbroker. She became interested in acting, performing in amateur theater shows as a young girl and was spotted by a talent agent in 1940 during a school play shortly before graduating from Hollywood High School. She began studying under famed drama Marie Ouspenskaya and a strong performance in a Pasadena Playhouse stage comedy of "What a Life" led to her first film, an uncredited part in "Her First Beau" (1941), followed by uncredited parts in "Whistling in the Dark" (1941), "Babes on Broadway" (1941), and "Rio Rita" (1942). In 1942 she contracted with MGM studios and screen tested for the female lead in "The Courtship of Andy Hardy" but lost out to Donna Reed. Afterward, she appeared in several films including "This Time for Keeps" (1942), "Keeper of the Flame" (1942), "The Youngest Profession," The Human Comedy" (1943), "Cry 'Havoc'" (1943), "Someone to Remember" (1943), "Rationing" (1944), and "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" (1944). Her biggest box office success came in 1945 with "Our Vines Have Tender Grapes" when she starred as the doomed Ingeborg Jensen. She also appeared in MGM short films including the "Pete Smith Specialties," "The Passing Parade," and "Crime Does Not Pay" series, the latter turning out so well that MGM expanded it into a full-length feature, "Main Street After Dark" in 1945. In 1946 she took a hiatus from acting until the late 1950s when she made guest appearances on television shows like "The Untouchables," "Gunsmoke,' "The Donna Reed Show," "Rawhide," "The Millionaire," and "Wagon Train" along with a featured role in the shocker film "Macabre" (1958). Following a small role in "Seconds" (1966) she left her career but returned to television in the early 1970s with episodes in "Dragnet," "The Name of the Game," and "Marcus Welby, M.D." She died at the age of 89.

Bio by: William Bjornstad


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: William Bjornstad
  • Added: 1 Jul 2013
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 113152706
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/113152706/dorothy-morris: accessed ), memorial page for Dorothy Morris (23 Feb 1922–20 Nov 2011), Find a Grave Memorial ID 113152706, ; Maintained by Find a Grave Donated to Medical Science, who reports a Donated to the University of California at Riverside.