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William Brandon “Will” McQuiddy

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William Brandon “Will” McQuiddy

Birth
Farmington, Knox County, Tennessee, USA
Death
2 Feb 1933 (aged 79)
Bell Buckle, Bedford County, Tennessee, USA
Burial
Bell Buckle, Bedford County, Tennessee, USA GPS-Latitude: 35.5833262, Longitude: -86.3580151
Memorial ID
View Source
Gospel preacher.

W. B. McQuiddy Has Gone Home
F.B.S.

Brother Will B. McQuiddy died at his home in Bellbuckle, Tenn., on February 2, 1933. He was born in Marshall County, near Farmington, Tenn., October 30, 1853. He was, therefore, more than seventy-nine years old at the time of his death. He attended Mars' Hill College, owned F.B.S. and operated by Brother T. B. Larimore, and his last year there was the school year that closed in June, 1880. This was my first year in college and his last; and while there were some years' difference in our ages, we formed a friendship which lasted till his death. He was married to Sister Chappell Wade of Iron City, Tenn., September 6, 1881. His wife was also educated at Mars' Hill, when it was a mixed school of boys and girls. They lived together as husband and wife over fifty-one years, and no two people were better suited to each other than were they. They were reared in about the same atmosphere, and both had the training of a Christian home and lived in about the same Christian environments and attended the same school, which made their companionship as husband and wife very happy. They were also good Christians, and these things united them into a very happy relationship for life with its duties and pleasures. They reared a family of two sons and four daughters, and they lost two children in infancy. Two sons and three daughters are yet on this side to comfort their mother in her declining days. Brother McQuiddy was a brother to J. C. McQuidy, who was so long connected with the Gospel Advocate. He is survived by two brothers and one sister. The brothers are Henry McQuiddy of near Lewisburg, Tenn., and John Mc- Quiddy of Nashville. Both of these are older than he, and his sister, Sister Orr of near Farmington, is younger. For a time, after leaving Mars' Hill, he evangelized with his brother, J. C. McQuiddy, in North Alabama and Tennessee. He preached one year at Sweetwater, Texas. But he decided he could do more good by working for the railroad and preaching for the poor in the community where he lived. His home for a while was at Normandy, Tenn. There was no church there, but largely through his influence, work, and liberality a church was established and a nice meetinghouse was built, and the congregation prospered while he was there. For many years he lived at Bellbuckle, Tenn., and was one of the elders of that church till his death. He preached on Sundays in communities around him, and was always a welcome visitor as a preacher and as a friend and brother in any community and in any Christian home. Brother Will was a good boy, a faithful man, and a true Christian. He was a servant of the Lord for nearly sixty-two years. This was a long life of service, but it was not a service of slavish fear, but a service of love. "God spoke unto Joshua the son of Nun, saying, My servant Moses is dead." The greatest compliment that can be paid to any man is to say, "He was a servant of God," and yet Christ said to his disciples: "Ye are my friends, if ye do the things which I command you. No longer do I call you servants, but I have called you friends." Brother McQuiddy served Christ as a friend; he loved to serve him. His neighbors honored and respected him for his sincerity and devotion to duty. His funeral was attended by more people than any funeral in Bellbuckle in many years. His neighbors will miss him; the town and the community will miss him; the church will miss him; his kinsfolk will miss him; but most of all his faithful wife will miss him. She said to me when I left her after the funeral: "What will I do without Willie?" Sad indeed was the parting, but sweet will be the meeting on the other side. It is good-by now, but time will swiftly pass and soon it will be good morning as they meet in the eternal presence of God. May the Lord deal gently with the widow, and may the children cherish the memory of their father and follow him as he followed Christ. May they be a reunited family in the city of God, the home of the saved. Gospel Advocate, May 18, 1933, p. 469.
Gospel preacher.

W. B. McQuiddy Has Gone Home
F.B.S.

Brother Will B. McQuiddy died at his home in Bellbuckle, Tenn., on February 2, 1933. He was born in Marshall County, near Farmington, Tenn., October 30, 1853. He was, therefore, more than seventy-nine years old at the time of his death. He attended Mars' Hill College, owned F.B.S. and operated by Brother T. B. Larimore, and his last year there was the school year that closed in June, 1880. This was my first year in college and his last; and while there were some years' difference in our ages, we formed a friendship which lasted till his death. He was married to Sister Chappell Wade of Iron City, Tenn., September 6, 1881. His wife was also educated at Mars' Hill, when it was a mixed school of boys and girls. They lived together as husband and wife over fifty-one years, and no two people were better suited to each other than were they. They were reared in about the same atmosphere, and both had the training of a Christian home and lived in about the same Christian environments and attended the same school, which made their companionship as husband and wife very happy. They were also good Christians, and these things united them into a very happy relationship for life with its duties and pleasures. They reared a family of two sons and four daughters, and they lost two children in infancy. Two sons and three daughters are yet on this side to comfort their mother in her declining days. Brother McQuiddy was a brother to J. C. McQuidy, who was so long connected with the Gospel Advocate. He is survived by two brothers and one sister. The brothers are Henry McQuiddy of near Lewisburg, Tenn., and John Mc- Quiddy of Nashville. Both of these are older than he, and his sister, Sister Orr of near Farmington, is younger. For a time, after leaving Mars' Hill, he evangelized with his brother, J. C. McQuiddy, in North Alabama and Tennessee. He preached one year at Sweetwater, Texas. But he decided he could do more good by working for the railroad and preaching for the poor in the community where he lived. His home for a while was at Normandy, Tenn. There was no church there, but largely through his influence, work, and liberality a church was established and a nice meetinghouse was built, and the congregation prospered while he was there. For many years he lived at Bellbuckle, Tenn., and was one of the elders of that church till his death. He preached on Sundays in communities around him, and was always a welcome visitor as a preacher and as a friend and brother in any community and in any Christian home. Brother Will was a good boy, a faithful man, and a true Christian. He was a servant of the Lord for nearly sixty-two years. This was a long life of service, but it was not a service of slavish fear, but a service of love. "God spoke unto Joshua the son of Nun, saying, My servant Moses is dead." The greatest compliment that can be paid to any man is to say, "He was a servant of God," and yet Christ said to his disciples: "Ye are my friends, if ye do the things which I command you. No longer do I call you servants, but I have called you friends." Brother McQuiddy served Christ as a friend; he loved to serve him. His neighbors honored and respected him for his sincerity and devotion to duty. His funeral was attended by more people than any funeral in Bellbuckle in many years. His neighbors will miss him; the town and the community will miss him; the church will miss him; his kinsfolk will miss him; but most of all his faithful wife will miss him. She said to me when I left her after the funeral: "What will I do without Willie?" Sad indeed was the parting, but sweet will be the meeting on the other side. It is good-by now, but time will swiftly pass and soon it will be good morning as they meet in the eternal presence of God. May the Lord deal gently with the widow, and may the children cherish the memory of their father and follow him as he followed Christ. May they be a reunited family in the city of God, the home of the saved. Gospel Advocate, May 18, 1933, p. 469.


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