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Arthur Everet Capstick

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Arthur Everet Capstick

Birth
Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Death
28 Sep 1918 (aged 38)
Royalton, Franklin County, Illinois, USA
Burial
Edwardsville, Madison County, Illinois, USA GPS-Latitude: 38.810531, Longitude: -89.9772973
Memorial ID
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Arthur was the oldest child of Joseph A. Capstick and Clara E. Thompson. Like his father, he was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He served in the United States infantry during the Spanish American War.

Arthur was married to Myrtle E. Wiesmann. They lived in Edwardsville, Illinois and were the parents of 7 children.

Arthur was a general superintendent for the Franklin Coal & Coke Company. On 28 Sep 1918, he was summoned to the mine at Royalton when it caught on fire. He went into the mine to help battle the blaze and was killed along with 22 others when it exploded.

At the time of his death, Arthur was 38 years, 1 month and 27 days old. He was survived by his wife, Myrtle; and 7 children. He was buried in Edwardsville, Madison County, Illinois on 02 Oct 1918.

Arthur's 16-year-old brother, Maylon Manard Capstick, was also a coal miner. He died of influenza during the Spanish flu epidemic on 18 Oct 1918 in Hillsboro, Montgomery County, Illinois less than 3 weeks after Arthur's death.

Arthur's wife, Myrtle, went on to become the first female mail messenger in Edwardsville, Illinois in late December of 1922. The job involved 14 hour work days and she was assisted by 1 of the Capsticks' teen-aged sons.

Children: 4 sons, 3 daughters.

Father of:
Arthur Henry Capstick
Joseph Travis Capstick
Alexander W. Capstick
Lincoln Sherman Capstick, Sr.
Myrtle Eva Capstick Klauburg
Esther Capstick Wilson
Ethel Capstick Mueller

Arthur's siblings:
Wesley Capstick
Richard Joseph Capstick
Edward Capstick
Levi M. Capstick
Elliot Capstick
Maylon Manard Capstick

----------

Newspaper articles:

EXPLOSION TRAPS 23 MEN IN MINE;
4 BODIES FOUND

Party, Including Manager and
Superintendent, Went Into
Shaft at Royalton, Ill., to
Fight Fire.


MURPHYSBORO, Ill., Sept. 28.--Twenty-three men, including the manager and the superintendent, were trapped in the north mine of the Franklin Coal and Coke Co., at Royalton, 85 miles southeast of St. Louis, by an explosion at 5 a.m., today, after they had gone down to fight a fire that was discovered by a watchman last night.

State mine rescuers, protected by smoke helmets, reached the bottom of the shaft at 11 a.m., and found four bodies in the level, near the shaft. They did not attempt to bring the bodies to the surface, but tried to penetrate farther into the level. They said there was no hope of finding any of the others alive.

A twenty-fourth man, who went down with the others, was near the air shaft at the other end of the tunnel, when the explosion occurred, and succeeded in escaping that way. Rescuers descended that shaft also, but did not find any bodies near it.

An effort to recover additional bodies was planned for this afternoon, failing in which it was proposed to seal up the mine by bratticing, to extinguish the fire.

A gas explosion in the same mine on Oct. 27, 1914, cost the lives of 52 men. A great many more were in the mine then, but the majority escaped.

The level on which the men were caught is 400 feet from the surface. The shaft is perpendicular.

Wives and children of the trapped men crowded around the hoisting house, screaming, sobbing and praying. There was some relief when the rescuers from the State station at Benton arrived, but as they descended repeatedly into the smoking shaft, only to be driven back, it was seen that hope of rescue was virtually gone, and outbursts of grief became more violent and frequent.

The mine has not been operated at night, and the watchman was alone in the mine after midnight, when he discovered the fire. He sounded the alarm, and Superintendent Capstick, Manager Helm and 22 miners descended to fight the flames. It was not long until an explosion occurred, at a time when more miners were prepared to descend. The man who escaped could tell nothing of his companions.

Royalton has about 2000 population, almost all miners and their families. There is only one telephone line into the town, and no telegraph. The rescue station at Benton was notified immediately, and physicians also went from Murphysboro.

(St. Louis Post-Dispatch; 28 Sep 1918; page 3)

-----

23 BELIEVED DEAD IN
COAL MINE EXPLOSION

Six Bodies Recovered at
Royalton and Hope for Others
Is Abandoned.


Six bodies had been taken from the north mine of the Franklin Coal and Coke Co., at Royalton, Ill., 85 miles southeast of St. Louis, last night, and hope of finding alive the remaining 15 or 20 men who were trapped by an explosion at 5 a.m. yesterday was abandoned. The level on which the men were was sealed up to extinguish the fire that prevented recovery of the bodies.

Accounts of the number of men lost were at wide variance, ranging from 18 to 40, but apparently reliable reports place it at about 23.

Among those who perished were Supt. A. E. Capstick, Manager Theo. Helm, Pit Boss A. A. Capstick, Assistant Bosses Tony Heberer, Grover Capps and Harry McLaughlin, and Examiners William Ditterline, D. Alvis, Jettie Harris and J. Bothman.

A watchman discovered a fire in a level 320 feet below the surface at 1 a.m. and the miners responded to the alarm and went into the mine to extinguish the blaze. They were closing up the entries of galleries at 5 a.m. when an explosion occurred 3500 feet from the shaft.

Bodies Near Explosion Point.

A dozen men working near the shaft escaped. The others were cut off by the explosion, and were suffocated or burned. The six bodies were found a few feet from where the explosion occurred, and the others are known to be beyond the point, in the same gallery.

Fifty-two men were killed in the same mine by a gas explosion Oct. 27, 1914.

Women Pray at Pit.

Nearly all of the dead men were married, and a majority had families. Wild scene took place around the mouth of the shaft yesterday morning, wives and children of the trapped men screaming, praying and calling on others to rescue those in the mine.

State mine rescuers from the station at Benton arrived soon after the explosion, and succeeded, with the aid of smoke helmets, in getting to the bottom of the shaft, but it was not until 11 a.m. that the first bodies were reached.

Several hundred men are employed in the mine, which is one of the largest in Southern Illinois. Royalton's population of about 2000 is composed almost entirely of miners' families. Virtually all of those killed are Americans.

(St. Louis Post-Dispatch; 29 Sep 1918; page A3)
Arthur was the oldest child of Joseph A. Capstick and Clara E. Thompson. Like his father, he was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He served in the United States infantry during the Spanish American War.

Arthur was married to Myrtle E. Wiesmann. They lived in Edwardsville, Illinois and were the parents of 7 children.

Arthur was a general superintendent for the Franklin Coal & Coke Company. On 28 Sep 1918, he was summoned to the mine at Royalton when it caught on fire. He went into the mine to help battle the blaze and was killed along with 22 others when it exploded.

At the time of his death, Arthur was 38 years, 1 month and 27 days old. He was survived by his wife, Myrtle; and 7 children. He was buried in Edwardsville, Madison County, Illinois on 02 Oct 1918.

Arthur's 16-year-old brother, Maylon Manard Capstick, was also a coal miner. He died of influenza during the Spanish flu epidemic on 18 Oct 1918 in Hillsboro, Montgomery County, Illinois less than 3 weeks after Arthur's death.

Arthur's wife, Myrtle, went on to become the first female mail messenger in Edwardsville, Illinois in late December of 1922. The job involved 14 hour work days and she was assisted by 1 of the Capsticks' teen-aged sons.

Children: 4 sons, 3 daughters.

Father of:
Arthur Henry Capstick
Joseph Travis Capstick
Alexander W. Capstick
Lincoln Sherman Capstick, Sr.
Myrtle Eva Capstick Klauburg
Esther Capstick Wilson
Ethel Capstick Mueller

Arthur's siblings:
Wesley Capstick
Richard Joseph Capstick
Edward Capstick
Levi M. Capstick
Elliot Capstick
Maylon Manard Capstick

----------

Newspaper articles:

EXPLOSION TRAPS 23 MEN IN MINE;
4 BODIES FOUND

Party, Including Manager and
Superintendent, Went Into
Shaft at Royalton, Ill., to
Fight Fire.


MURPHYSBORO, Ill., Sept. 28.--Twenty-three men, including the manager and the superintendent, were trapped in the north mine of the Franklin Coal and Coke Co., at Royalton, 85 miles southeast of St. Louis, by an explosion at 5 a.m., today, after they had gone down to fight a fire that was discovered by a watchman last night.

State mine rescuers, protected by smoke helmets, reached the bottom of the shaft at 11 a.m., and found four bodies in the level, near the shaft. They did not attempt to bring the bodies to the surface, but tried to penetrate farther into the level. They said there was no hope of finding any of the others alive.

A twenty-fourth man, who went down with the others, was near the air shaft at the other end of the tunnel, when the explosion occurred, and succeeded in escaping that way. Rescuers descended that shaft also, but did not find any bodies near it.

An effort to recover additional bodies was planned for this afternoon, failing in which it was proposed to seal up the mine by bratticing, to extinguish the fire.

A gas explosion in the same mine on Oct. 27, 1914, cost the lives of 52 men. A great many more were in the mine then, but the majority escaped.

The level on which the men were caught is 400 feet from the surface. The shaft is perpendicular.

Wives and children of the trapped men crowded around the hoisting house, screaming, sobbing and praying. There was some relief when the rescuers from the State station at Benton arrived, but as they descended repeatedly into the smoking shaft, only to be driven back, it was seen that hope of rescue was virtually gone, and outbursts of grief became more violent and frequent.

The mine has not been operated at night, and the watchman was alone in the mine after midnight, when he discovered the fire. He sounded the alarm, and Superintendent Capstick, Manager Helm and 22 miners descended to fight the flames. It was not long until an explosion occurred, at a time when more miners were prepared to descend. The man who escaped could tell nothing of his companions.

Royalton has about 2000 population, almost all miners and their families. There is only one telephone line into the town, and no telegraph. The rescue station at Benton was notified immediately, and physicians also went from Murphysboro.

(St. Louis Post-Dispatch; 28 Sep 1918; page 3)

-----

23 BELIEVED DEAD IN
COAL MINE EXPLOSION

Six Bodies Recovered at
Royalton and Hope for Others
Is Abandoned.


Six bodies had been taken from the north mine of the Franklin Coal and Coke Co., at Royalton, Ill., 85 miles southeast of St. Louis, last night, and hope of finding alive the remaining 15 or 20 men who were trapped by an explosion at 5 a.m. yesterday was abandoned. The level on which the men were was sealed up to extinguish the fire that prevented recovery of the bodies.

Accounts of the number of men lost were at wide variance, ranging from 18 to 40, but apparently reliable reports place it at about 23.

Among those who perished were Supt. A. E. Capstick, Manager Theo. Helm, Pit Boss A. A. Capstick, Assistant Bosses Tony Heberer, Grover Capps and Harry McLaughlin, and Examiners William Ditterline, D. Alvis, Jettie Harris and J. Bothman.

A watchman discovered a fire in a level 320 feet below the surface at 1 a.m. and the miners responded to the alarm and went into the mine to extinguish the blaze. They were closing up the entries of galleries at 5 a.m. when an explosion occurred 3500 feet from the shaft.

Bodies Near Explosion Point.

A dozen men working near the shaft escaped. The others were cut off by the explosion, and were suffocated or burned. The six bodies were found a few feet from where the explosion occurred, and the others are known to be beyond the point, in the same gallery.

Fifty-two men were killed in the same mine by a gas explosion Oct. 27, 1914.

Women Pray at Pit.

Nearly all of the dead men were married, and a majority had families. Wild scene took place around the mouth of the shaft yesterday morning, wives and children of the trapped men screaming, praying and calling on others to rescue those in the mine.

State mine rescuers from the station at Benton arrived soon after the explosion, and succeeded, with the aid of smoke helmets, in getting to the bottom of the shaft, but it was not until 11 a.m. that the first bodies were reached.

Several hundred men are employed in the mine, which is one of the largest in Southern Illinois. Royalton's population of about 2000 is composed almost entirely of miners' families. Virtually all of those killed are Americans.

(St. Louis Post-Dispatch; 29 Sep 1918; page A3)

Gravesite Details

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