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Drusilla Sarah Coleman Curtis

Birth
Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky, USA
Death
29 May 1857 (aged 31)
Lafayette County, Missouri, USA
Burial
Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri, USA Add to Map
Plot
Taubman Addition Lot 18
Memorial ID
View Source
Below info provided by Member # 47091544 on Jul 5, 2020

I don't think this news article applies. Drusilla's husband was James Curtis.

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Lexington Intelligencer, November 16, 1901

Remains Well Preserved Through Buried Forty-Five Years Ago

On Thursday the remains of Mrs. Henry Curtis, who died at the age of thirty-three years, and who was buried in a family burying ground on the Alexander place, four miles south of Higginsville, forty-five years ago, and those of her two children, who had been buried beside their mother in the years long past, were disinterred, brought to Lexington and reburied in Machpelah cemetery.

When the relatives of the deceased concluded to have their remains removed they found it quite difficult to locate the exact spots at which their mortal parts slept. The graves were located, however, after a search of two or three days, and the remains found.

Strange to say, the body of Mrs. Curtis, though it had been asleep in death for nearly half a century, was in almost a perfect state of preservation. She was in a metallic casket and when the cover was removed that protected the glass frontis-piece of the coffin, those who looked wondered if their eyes were not deceiving them. As if in peaceful slumber she lay, with eyes and lips closed, presenting a most natural appearance.

Shortly afterward, however, the body began to turn dark and the lips parted, the supposition being that, though the cover proper to the casket had not been removed, air in some manner found its way into the box when the metallic cap that covered the glass over the face was displaced.

The only remains of the children found were the bones and teeth. They had been buried in wooden coffins and the march of time had had effect upon them that could not apply to contents of the metal case.
Below info provided by Member # 47091544 on Jul 5, 2020

I don't think this news article applies. Drusilla's husband was James Curtis.

++++++++++++

Lexington Intelligencer, November 16, 1901

Remains Well Preserved Through Buried Forty-Five Years Ago

On Thursday the remains of Mrs. Henry Curtis, who died at the age of thirty-three years, and who was buried in a family burying ground on the Alexander place, four miles south of Higginsville, forty-five years ago, and those of her two children, who had been buried beside their mother in the years long past, were disinterred, brought to Lexington and reburied in Machpelah cemetery.

When the relatives of the deceased concluded to have their remains removed they found it quite difficult to locate the exact spots at which their mortal parts slept. The graves were located, however, after a search of two or three days, and the remains found.

Strange to say, the body of Mrs. Curtis, though it had been asleep in death for nearly half a century, was in almost a perfect state of preservation. She was in a metallic casket and when the cover was removed that protected the glass frontis-piece of the coffin, those who looked wondered if their eyes were not deceiving them. As if in peaceful slumber she lay, with eyes and lips closed, presenting a most natural appearance.

Shortly afterward, however, the body began to turn dark and the lips parted, the supposition being that, though the cover proper to the casket had not been removed, air in some manner found its way into the box when the metallic cap that covered the glass over the face was displaced.

The only remains of the children found were the bones and teeth. They had been buried in wooden coffins and the march of time had had effect upon them that could not apply to contents of the metal case.


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