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 Benjamin Stephen Morgan

Benjamin Stephen Morgan

Birth
Death 3 Mar 1945 (aged 90)
Burial Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia, USA
Memorial ID 111810302 · View Source
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History of Charleston and Kanawha County, West Virginia and Representative
Citizens
W.S. Laidley
Richmond Arnold Publishing Co., Chicago, ILL.
1911
p. 447-449

BENJAMIN STEPHEN MORGAN, who is engaged in the practice of law at Charleston, West Virginia, bears a name that has been linked with the history of West Virginia since the earliest settlement. The name has been honorably borne by pioneers in different. counties, whose descendants have filled positions in both civic and military life, and all, down to the latest generation, have been noted for the sturdy independence - that is characteristic of Welchmen the world over.
Col. Morgan Morgan, the lineal ancestor of Benjamin Stephen Morgan, was born in the Principality of Wales and received his education in London, England. During the reign of William III he came to the colony of Delaware, and
during the reign of Queen Anne was a resident of Christiana, Delaware, moving from there to the colony of Virginia, prior to 1726 settling near Winchester. He is credited with having made the first white settlement and
with having built the first church in the territory of West Virginia (in the present county of Berkley). In "A History of Frederick County, Virginia"(now comprising the counties of Hampshire, Berkley, Jefferson, Hardy and Morgan in West Virginia and Clarke, Warren, Shenandoah and Frederick in
Virginia) by Mr. T. K. Cartmell, and in Bishop Meade's "Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia," and also in "Records of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Western Virginia and in West Virginia" by Bishop Geo. W. Peterkin, we find such an account and record of the public and private life of Col. Morgan Morgan as unmistakably shows that he was a man of splendid character and a high type of christian manhood. He married Catherine Garretson and they had eight children born to them, namely: Morgan, Jr., Ann,
Zackwell, David, Charles, Henry, Evan and James. Morgan Morgan, Jr., became a minister in the Protestant Episcopal church. Ann married a man named Springer. Zackwell Morgan served with the rank of Colonel in the Continental Army. James Morgan was a Captain in the Continental Army and was captured and shot by a party of Tories at a place afterwards called Torytown, Berkley County, Virginia.David Morgan, third son of Morgan and Catherine (Garretson) Morgan, was born in 1721 at Christiana, Delaware, and died in 1796 and was buried in the family graveyard about one mile below the present town of Rivesville, Marion County, West Virginia. He was a surveyor and with his brother Zackwell moved to the valley of the Monbngahela. Zackwell settled where is now the old town of Morgantown, after whom the town was named. David settled near where is now the town of Rivesville, Marion County. His name is mentioned in connection with the Indian border warfare in "Wither's Border Warfare," and he is the great-great-grandfather of Benjamin Stephen Morgan of Charleston.
In 1887 his descendants and relatives erected a monument to him on the spot where he had the encounter with the Indians in 1779.He was the father of the following chil-dren: Morgan, Evan, James, Zackwell, Elizabeth, Stephen and Sara. Elizabeth married a Mr. Lowe and Sara married a
Mr. Burns.Stephen H. Morgan, son of Zackwell Morgan, spent his entire life in what is now West Virginia. He was for several terms elected to the State Legislature of Virginia.
Smallwood G. Morgan, son of Stephen H. Morgan, and father of Benjamin Stephen Morgan, was born in Marion County, West Virginia, and on February 9, 1911, passed his ninety-first milestone. He has lived a long and busy life, his
business interests mainly agricultural, and during his active years he served as a Justice of the Peace and in many public capacities where sound judgment and enlightened views were necessary qualifications. He retains his
faculties to a remarkable degree and continues to be interested in all that concerns local affairs in his county and also in the great outside world, concerning which he is well informed.Smallwood G. Morgan has been twice married, first to Oliza Thorn, and second to Mrs. Anary (Windsor) Wilson, the latter of whom was the widow of Thomas Wilson. The first wife, Oliza Thorn, was born in 1822. In Monongalia County, now West Virginia, and died there in 1866. She was a daughter of Benjamin and Mary (Magruder) Thorn, who moved from Frederick County, Virginia, to the
Monongahela Valley. He was a large planter and slave holder prior to the Civil War. Six children were born to this marriage and four of these survive, namely: Margaret, who is the wife of A. S. Wisman, residing on a farm in Grant District, Monongalia County, and they have five children; Sherrard, who is a farmer in Grant District; Benjamin S.; and Eugenie, who is the widow of W. C. Fisher, who was a farmer and merchant. He is survived by three children and they live with their mother near Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia.
Benjamin S. Morgan was born in 1854 in Marion County, Virginia, but was reared in Monongalia County. He attended the University at West Virginia and graduated with the class of 1878, in the classical course and military
training school, and later from the law department of the same institution, securing his degree with the class of 1883. Prior to the completion of his law course, however, he had been prominent in educational work and had been
superintendent of the public schools of Morgantown from 1878 until 1881 and county superintendent of Monongalia County from 1881 till 1885, having been twice elected.
In 1884 he was elected State Superintendent of Free Schools, having been nominated on the Democratic ticket. He was renominated and elected in 1888, receiving each time the largest vote cast for any state officer. His work as
State Superintendent was along broad and constructive lines. While County Superintendent of Monongalia County, he prepared and published at his own expense an outlined course of study for use in the country schools of his
county. Acting on the fundamental principle that the teacher must first possess the qualities you desire to put into your schools, he sought to improve the teachers' county institutes held annually and the State Normal
Schools. At conveniently accessible points, throughout the state, special graded institutes, provided with a corps of instructors of national reputation, were held each year by him under the auspices of the Peabody Education Fund. County institute work, so far as practicable, was graded, thus enabling teachers to secure better results in the short time given to this work. A state teacher's reading circle was established and the building up of public school libraries encouraged. He also secured the enactment of a law providing for the preparation by the State Superintendent of a graded course of study for all ungraded country schools. To this measure he had given much
attention. An Act was also secured for the establishment of a State Reform School for boys. Taking "The Unification of the Educational System of the State" as a rallying sentiment, he advocated the extension of the Graded and High School work, and with the co-operation of the West Virginia University, graduates of a number of high schools were admitted to the University on their diploma. As President of the six State Normal Schools, he was present at the forty-eighth commencement exercises and delivered the diplomas to the graduates.Mr. Morgan's attention and labors covered a wide field during his term. He was president of the State Educational Association and prepared the annual program, also published and edited the West Virginia School Journal during the eight years. He superintended the preparation of the State's educational
exhibit for the World's Columbian Fair at Chicago in 1893 and in this connection with Mr. J. F. Cork prepared the first History of Education in West Virginia. Ex-officio he was a member of the State Board of Public Works, the Printing Com-mission and the Board of the School Fund.
He declined to be a candidate for a third term and at the close of his second term, again began the practice of law. Charleston has profited by securing Mr. Morgan as a citizen for his interest has been easily secured in promoting every public spirited movement and every enterprise of determined
value to his section. He has served in the City Council. While being a good business man and enjoying his profession.
he is at the same time a man of scholarly and literary tastes. Mr. Morgan was married at Wheeling, W. Va., to Miss Annie Thoburn, who was born and educated at Wheeling, and is a daughter of John and Jane (Miller) Thoburn, both of whom were born in Belfast, Ireland, coming to Wheeling in
early life. The father of Mrs. Morgan was killed in a railroad accident, while still in the prime of life. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have two children John Thoburn and Benjamin Stephen. The older son was born November 25, 1889, and after graduating from the Charleston High School, entered the engineering department of the West Virginia University at Morgantown. Benjamin Stephen, the second son, was born October 27, 1901, and is a student in the public schools. Mrs. Morgan was reared in the United Presbyterian church, while Mr. Morgan was brought up in the Methodist faith.


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  • Created by: Cathy Levandowski
  • Added: 4 Jun 2013
  • Find A Grave Memorial 111810302
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Benjamin Stephen Morgan (11 Mar 1854–3 Mar 1945), Find A Grave Memorial no. 111810302, citing Spring Hill Cemetery, Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Cathy Levandowski (contributor 46866637) .