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 John McCausland

John McCausland

Birth
Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, USA
Death 22 Jan 1927 (aged 90)
Point Pleasant, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Burial Henderson, Mason County, West Virginia, USA
Memorial ID 11029 · View Source
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Brigadier General, Confederate States Army. He was born at St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Irish immigrants. He was only 7 years old when his parents died, and went to live with his uncle, Alexander McCausland, whose farm was in what is now West Virginia. In 1857 he graduated first in his class from Virginia Military Institute. Ater studying a year at the University of Virginia, he returned to the institute as an assistant professor of mathematics and tactics. In 1859 he, along with Thomas Jackson, accompanied the detachment of VMI cadets sent to stand guard at John Brown's execution. In spring 1861 he organized and became Colonel of the 36th Virginia Infantry, which saw service in its home area of western Virginia as well as at Fort Donelson, where it was one of the few Confederate units to escape capture. Known as "Tiger John" by his men, he performed thereafter in southwestern Virginia. On May 9, 1864, at Cloyd's Mountain, he succeeded to command after the death of Brigadier General Albert G. Jenkins; his brigadier's commission came 9 days later. He led cavalry for the remainder of the war, serving under Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, in the Shenandoah Valley. He went with Early to the outskirts of Washington D.C., and fought well at Monocacy on the way. He is best remembered for a July 1864 raid into Pennsylvania, where acting under orders, he demanded $100,000 in gold from the citizens of Chambersburg in retribution for destruction of private homes in the valley by Union Major General David Hunter. When the town merchants refused to pay, he evacuated Chambersburg's residents and set fire to the business district. He then fought at Third Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek. During the final fighting he was with General Robert E. Lee, he cut his way through the Federal lines at Appomattox rather than surrender. A few days later he disbanded his men. He then went to Europe, Canada, and Mexico to avoid arraignment for the Chambersburg fire. Though formally charged with arson, President Grant intervened on his behalf. Having returned to the United States in 1867, he acquired 6,000 acres in Mason City, West Virginia. There, in self-imposed isolation, he spent the rest of his life. In 1919, the United States Congress officially restored his citizenship. He was the next-to-last Confederate general to die. He died an "unreconstructed" rebel who once commented at the thought of his sons becoming soldiers, "I rather see my boys dead, than to wear the blue uniform."

Bio by: Ugaalltheway



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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 16 Jul 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 11029
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for John McCausland (13 Sep 1836–22 Jan 1927), Find A Grave Memorial no. 11029, citing Smith Cemetery, Henderson, Mason County, West Virginia, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .