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Sgt Albert Smith

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Sgt Albert Smith Veteran

Birth
Ashfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
30 Oct 1892 (aged 87)
Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, USA
Burial
Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
Son of David Smith & Deborah Alden

Married Esther Dutcher, 19 May 1826, Boylston, Oswego, New York

Married Rhoda Gifford, 17 Oct 1856, Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Married Sophie Catherine Wilhelmine Klauen, 15 Feb 1857, Salt Lake City, Utah


The History of Albert Smith
I was born in Ashfield, Franklin Co., Mass. in Nov 18, 1804. When I was one year Old my parents moved to Nelson, Madison Co., New York. When I was 7years old my father died leaving a family of nine children. My mother being of no means of living had to send a number of her children from home to live. At the age of twelve years I was sent 12 miles to live with a stranger by the name of Adolphos Eddy. One year after there was a revival of religion and I joined the Baptist Church. I lived there till I was 14 years old when my mother and oldest brother wished me to come home. I therefore went home to live. One year after I took my pack on my back and went l60 miles to where I was
born to the town of Ashfield, Mass. to live with Mr. Wing in order to learn the carpentry and joiners trade. There was a Presbyterian Church near by where I lived with a large bell in it that I could hear daily. It was five miles to the Baptist Church in the north east corner of town. Although I was only l6 or 17 years old yet I was so zealous in the faith of the Baptist Church that I went there on foot and alone a good deal of the time to meeting. Perhaps one half and perhaps more were of my relatives, uncles and great uncles, cousins, and great cousins and my great uncle. My Grandfather Smith, most 80 years old was their preacher and had been perhaps for more than 35 years. After living there between 2 and 3 years I went with Bro. Alfred, who had lived there for a number of years. (Note: "A corner of this page has been torn off; so the next four sentences will be incomplete) back to Nelson on a Visit. My friends counseled...back I staid and went to school that winter...board night and morning in the spring...for a man by the name of Mr. Avery...by the month or by the job till I was 2....

The following winter the year 1837, Father John Smith (Brother to Joseph Smith Sr., the Prophet's father) I sold him a span of horses for (I think) 100 dollars. I was to
have land in Missouri for it. Before I got there he with all the rest of the Saints, was driven from the state under an exterminate orders by Bogs the Governor.

The following spring 1837 the whole Church, The Latter Day Saints, was driven from Kirtland. They went to Farwest, in the state of Missouri, being desirous to gather with the Saints. My father-in-law and myself took 12 acres of land to clear to get some means to help us to move to Missouri, the place of gathering of the saints. The first of Oct. I started with a team in company with Vester Steardiford and Iaaac Outercock. We had good weather good roads and good health to Richmond, Indiana. From there to Terre Haute I think it was the worst road that I had traveled. It rained and snowed in most of the time which made it very is agreeable as we had to camp in our wagons. About this time we commenced to hear all manner of reports from Missouri. It being the same fall that the saints were driven from the State. We got to Indianapolis we heard that they had
got Br. Joseph the Prophet in jail and a number of others of our leaders and that they had received their sentence to be hung and all the rest was to leave the State. It was common after that, when we met strangers, for us to receive the following salutation (they taking us to be Mormons) well friends you may as well take the back track for they have got old Jo and they are going to hang them. But these statements seemed but idle tales to us. We continued our Journey till we got to Rochester, Ill. 6 miles east of Springfield, Ill. We stopped over Sunday.

Mon. morning we left our teams and families and went to Springfield there being a branch of the Church there. There we found out the truth that they had the Prophet in
jail and a number of others and that the governor had given orders to have the saints driven from the state by Apr. or have them all exterminated; which orders the mob called the Militia was determining to have carried out. Before I moved from there one of my oxen died by being choked. Br. Stoardiford moved to Springfield. My Br.-in-law and myself moved 3 miles north into a double log house, if you can imagine, without a door, a window or a chimney, but we soon made it quite comfortable. Here we found two families of Mormons, Bro. Arnold Stevens and Bro. Joseph Coons. Shortly after we got here Br. Wilford Woodruff came here with a small company from the State of Maine. Bro. Woodruff joined with me in making shingles and other work till spring. In the last of March Br. Woodruff moved to Quincy, Ill.; when he left I bought him a five dollar hat and gave him 30 dollars for him to apply it where he thought it was the most needed as many of the Saints that was driven were in a suffering condition. Previous to this there had been a revelation given to this effect that at the Apr. Conference, Apr. 6th, 1839, they
should commence to build the temple and from that place start to go to nations of the earth to preach the gospel and etc. (They the twelve) and some others went to Missouri and Farwest and fulfilled the above revelation to the very letter by commencing the temple and laying the corner stone and then the master workman joined the work till a more convenient time. I will give the name of Brothers and Sisters with their husbands. My oldest sister's name is Deborah. She married Abraham Read. My oldest brother is David. His wifes name is Susannah House (my cousin). My mother's third child's name is Candace;
she married Onestus Sherman. My next sister's name is Pricilla, she married Noble Henmon. The next is Alfred. His wife's name is Rody Root (he died soon after they
were married.) Moses, his wife's name is Unice Farmer, Zephaniah, his wife's name I do not know. Jemima, the youngest, her husband's name is Eliot Mason. Soon after I was 21, I went to Boyleston, N.Y. and bought 60 acres of land near where my Br.-in-law O. Sherman lived. There after I got married after four months and 11 days of acquaintance. My wife's name is Esther Dutcher. We were married May 11, 1826. She was born on 11 Jan. 1811 in Cherry Valley, N.Y. We lived In Boyleston, Oswego, N.Y. 10 years in that time we had 3 children. Our first child, was born Aug. 1, 1828. His name is Axariah. The next was born Jan 1832. Her name is Emily H. The next was born Dec. 2lst 1833 named Candace. Our fourth child was born in Nauvoo,
Hancock Co., Ill, in Sept. 2lst 1844. His name is Joseph. 5th and last by my first wife was born in Salt Lake City on May 9th 1849. Her name is Esther. (Note: A corner of the page is torn off. The following few sentences are
unfinished) Cold and very snowy one snow storm which…the sow fell five feet that perhaps well satisfy…of snowy place it was not only cold and…but so cold and frosty summers that, not raise wheat and other crops very poor. The summer I lived in Halys settlement. I took up 10 acres of farming land on unbroken prairie and fenced it, broke it
and put it in the fall, I got materials for a house 18 by 22 feet, not only the frames but the roofing, flooring, siding, window frames. Yes and the window sashes. This country at this time was very new. I think it was 18 or 20 miles to a sawmill. I took the whole of it to the river ready to take it across as soon as the river froze over. In Sep. my wife was sick with the scarlet fever 3 weeks. The first of Jan 1841 I commenced to take over my house, The river being froze. My team was the first that crossed that winter when I got my frame (for it was framed) and all the materials across; I then moved my family across
and moved in with my Br.-in-law, Isaac Outercork. This winter my wife had a serious time with the winter fever. I put my house and finished it sufficient to move into it Apr. 6, 1841. On this day commenced the annual conference. The first day was laid the corner stone of the temple.

* Mormon Battalion members
Son of David Smith & Deborah Alden

Married Esther Dutcher, 19 May 1826, Boylston, Oswego, New York

Married Rhoda Gifford, 17 Oct 1856, Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Married Sophie Catherine Wilhelmine Klauen, 15 Feb 1857, Salt Lake City, Utah


The History of Albert Smith
I was born in Ashfield, Franklin Co., Mass. in Nov 18, 1804. When I was one year Old my parents moved to Nelson, Madison Co., New York. When I was 7years old my father died leaving a family of nine children. My mother being of no means of living had to send a number of her children from home to live. At the age of twelve years I was sent 12 miles to live with a stranger by the name of Adolphos Eddy. One year after there was a revival of religion and I joined the Baptist Church. I lived there till I was 14 years old when my mother and oldest brother wished me to come home. I therefore went home to live. One year after I took my pack on my back and went l60 miles to where I was
born to the town of Ashfield, Mass. to live with Mr. Wing in order to learn the carpentry and joiners trade. There was a Presbyterian Church near by where I lived with a large bell in it that I could hear daily. It was five miles to the Baptist Church in the north east corner of town. Although I was only l6 or 17 years old yet I was so zealous in the faith of the Baptist Church that I went there on foot and alone a good deal of the time to meeting. Perhaps one half and perhaps more were of my relatives, uncles and great uncles, cousins, and great cousins and my great uncle. My Grandfather Smith, most 80 years old was their preacher and had been perhaps for more than 35 years. After living there between 2 and 3 years I went with Bro. Alfred, who had lived there for a number of years. (Note: "A corner of this page has been torn off; so the next four sentences will be incomplete) back to Nelson on a Visit. My friends counseled...back I staid and went to school that winter...board night and morning in the spring...for a man by the name of Mr. Avery...by the month or by the job till I was 2....

The following winter the year 1837, Father John Smith (Brother to Joseph Smith Sr., the Prophet's father) I sold him a span of horses for (I think) 100 dollars. I was to
have land in Missouri for it. Before I got there he with all the rest of the Saints, was driven from the state under an exterminate orders by Bogs the Governor.

The following spring 1837 the whole Church, The Latter Day Saints, was driven from Kirtland. They went to Farwest, in the state of Missouri, being desirous to gather with the Saints. My father-in-law and myself took 12 acres of land to clear to get some means to help us to move to Missouri, the place of gathering of the saints. The first of Oct. I started with a team in company with Vester Steardiford and Iaaac Outercock. We had good weather good roads and good health to Richmond, Indiana. From there to Terre Haute I think it was the worst road that I had traveled. It rained and snowed in most of the time which made it very is agreeable as we had to camp in our wagons. About this time we commenced to hear all manner of reports from Missouri. It being the same fall that the saints were driven from the State. We got to Indianapolis we heard that they had
got Br. Joseph the Prophet in jail and a number of others of our leaders and that they had received their sentence to be hung and all the rest was to leave the State. It was common after that, when we met strangers, for us to receive the following salutation (they taking us to be Mormons) well friends you may as well take the back track for they have got old Jo and they are going to hang them. But these statements seemed but idle tales to us. We continued our Journey till we got to Rochester, Ill. 6 miles east of Springfield, Ill. We stopped over Sunday.

Mon. morning we left our teams and families and went to Springfield there being a branch of the Church there. There we found out the truth that they had the Prophet in
jail and a number of others and that the governor had given orders to have the saints driven from the state by Apr. or have them all exterminated; which orders the mob called the Militia was determining to have carried out. Before I moved from there one of my oxen died by being choked. Br. Stoardiford moved to Springfield. My Br.-in-law and myself moved 3 miles north into a double log house, if you can imagine, without a door, a window or a chimney, but we soon made it quite comfortable. Here we found two families of Mormons, Bro. Arnold Stevens and Bro. Joseph Coons. Shortly after we got here Br. Wilford Woodruff came here with a small company from the State of Maine. Bro. Woodruff joined with me in making shingles and other work till spring. In the last of March Br. Woodruff moved to Quincy, Ill.; when he left I bought him a five dollar hat and gave him 30 dollars for him to apply it where he thought it was the most needed as many of the Saints that was driven were in a suffering condition. Previous to this there had been a revelation given to this effect that at the Apr. Conference, Apr. 6th, 1839, they
should commence to build the temple and from that place start to go to nations of the earth to preach the gospel and etc. (They the twelve) and some others went to Missouri and Farwest and fulfilled the above revelation to the very letter by commencing the temple and laying the corner stone and then the master workman joined the work till a more convenient time. I will give the name of Brothers and Sisters with their husbands. My oldest sister's name is Deborah. She married Abraham Read. My oldest brother is David. His wifes name is Susannah House (my cousin). My mother's third child's name is Candace;
she married Onestus Sherman. My next sister's name is Pricilla, she married Noble Henmon. The next is Alfred. His wife's name is Rody Root (he died soon after they
were married.) Moses, his wife's name is Unice Farmer, Zephaniah, his wife's name I do not know. Jemima, the youngest, her husband's name is Eliot Mason. Soon after I was 21, I went to Boyleston, N.Y. and bought 60 acres of land near where my Br.-in-law O. Sherman lived. There after I got married after four months and 11 days of acquaintance. My wife's name is Esther Dutcher. We were married May 11, 1826. She was born on 11 Jan. 1811 in Cherry Valley, N.Y. We lived In Boyleston, Oswego, N.Y. 10 years in that time we had 3 children. Our first child, was born Aug. 1, 1828. His name is Axariah. The next was born Jan 1832. Her name is Emily H. The next was born Dec. 2lst 1833 named Candace. Our fourth child was born in Nauvoo,
Hancock Co., Ill, in Sept. 2lst 1844. His name is Joseph. 5th and last by my first wife was born in Salt Lake City on May 9th 1849. Her name is Esther. (Note: A corner of the page is torn off. The following few sentences are
unfinished) Cold and very snowy one snow storm which…the sow fell five feet that perhaps well satisfy…of snowy place it was not only cold and…but so cold and frosty summers that, not raise wheat and other crops very poor. The summer I lived in Halys settlement. I took up 10 acres of farming land on unbroken prairie and fenced it, broke it
and put it in the fall, I got materials for a house 18 by 22 feet, not only the frames but the roofing, flooring, siding, window frames. Yes and the window sashes. This country at this time was very new. I think it was 18 or 20 miles to a sawmill. I took the whole of it to the river ready to take it across as soon as the river froze over. In Sep. my wife was sick with the scarlet fever 3 weeks. The first of Jan 1841 I commenced to take over my house, The river being froze. My team was the first that crossed that winter when I got my frame (for it was framed) and all the materials across; I then moved my family across
and moved in with my Br.-in-law, Isaac Outercork. This winter my wife had a serious time with the winter fever. I put my house and finished it sufficient to move into it Apr. 6, 1841. On this day commenced the annual conference. The first day was laid the corner stone of the temple.

* Mormon Battalion members

Inscription

Joint headstone:

ALBERT SMITH
BORN
IN ASHFIELD
MASS.
NOV. 18. 1804.
DIED
OCT. 31. 1892.

ESTHER SMITH
BORN
IN CHERRY VALLEY
N. YORK
JAN. 25. 1811.
DIED
SEPT. 17. 1856.

Military headstone:

ALBERT SMITH
PVT UTAH TER MILITIA
INDIAN WARS
NOV 18 1804 _ OCT 31 1892

*TER represents Territorial.



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